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Full text of "Textile school catalog, 1917-1918"

LAND Title and 
Trust Company 

BROAD STREET 

CHESTNUT TO SANSOM 

PHILADELPHIA 

Capital . . . $2,000,000 
Surplus . • . $5,000,000 

FIRST TRUST COMPANY IN THE 
PHILADELPHIA CLEARING HOUSE 

Deposits Received upon -wliiclj Interest is Allowed 

Titles to Real Estate Insured 

Loans on Mortgage and Approved Securities 

Trusts Executed 

Safe Deposit Boxes Rented in Burglar-proof Vaults 

Travel Bureau 

President 

WILLIAM R. NICHOLSON 

Vice-President Second Vice-President 

RICHARD M. HARTLEY EDWARD H. BONSALL 

Secretary Treasiirer 

LOUIS A. DAVIS LOUIS P. GEIGER, Jr. 

Trust Officer 

CLAUDE A. SIMPLER 

DIRECTORS 

William R. Nicholson George W. Elkins Joseph E. Widener 

Heniy R. Gummey John W. Brock Edward H. Bonsall 

Samuel S. Sharp Harry G. Michener Frederick J. Geiger 

Richard M. Hartley Charles H. Harding William M. Elkins 

Frank P. Prichard Ralph H. North George D. Widener 



^^ >I W■W ««a'SB^B«*S^I^>Affa^;-^i^^^^^'.■■^i^^.'r.^V«^■ 



PENNSYLVANIA 



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SCHOOL of INDUSTRIAI 



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FORTY-FIRST SEASON 



»M >W»iWWM Bi«BW'S«IW»W»a8i<KW»W»Ml!giWB» 



CIRCULAR OF THE 



Philadelphia Textile School 

B R O A D A N D PINE STREETS 
P HI LADELPHIA 



1917-1918 




The "H ALTON "Jacquard 

THE STANDARD FOR OVER 40 YEARS 

200 to 2600 
Hooks 




Any Type 

Operates on Any 
Make of Loom 



Single Lift Machine with 

Independent Cylinder 

Motion 

HARNESS BUILDING— DOBBIES 



Independent Cylinder ^ . . ^ ^ i _ 

Motion Send lor Catalogue 



THOMAS HALTON'S SONS 

Allegheny Ave. and C St. (East of Front) PHILADELPHIA 



ESTABLISHED 1848 



JAS. H. BILUNGTON CO. 

Textile Mil! 
Supplies 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION FOR 

Cotton^ Woolen^ Silk and Worsted Machinery 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Bobbins^ Spools, Shuttles and Skewers 

Ofik Leather- Beltiitg, Raw Hide Pickers tad Speditltiei 



113 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 

pRCtorj': 1537 to 1545 RANDOLPH ST. 

Carre^pondenee Soticited 



Card Cutting Machinery 




Ever}' detail developed 
to the highest efficiency. 
Many movements auto- 
matic. Excellent work- 
ing convenience. Can 
be supplied with electric 
motor drive. 

Wi'ite fo7- Catalog 

JOHN ROYLE& SONS 

PATERSON :: NEW JERSEY 



Piano Machines, Lacers, Repeaters, Etc. 



WILLIAM SCHOFIELD CO. 

Iron Founders and Textile Machinery Builders 




This Machine can be seen at this School 

Opening and Dusting Macliine and Picker 

Furnished separately or together 

RELAGGING PICKER CYLINDERS 
A SPECIALTY 



BUILDERS OF 

SCHOFIELD'S Patent 
IMPROVED "Interme- 
diate" feed for Cards, 
Blamire feeds. Wool, 
Hair, Rag, Waste and 
Finishing or Lumper 
Pickers, Curled Hair 
Pickers, Automatic, 
Square, Cone and Old- 
ham Willows, Rag and 
Extract Dusters, Needle 
Looms for Hairfelts, 
Waste Pullers and all 
kinds of SPIKE and 
Slat Aprons, Gill Box 
Screws, Fluted Rollers. 



Manayunk, Phila., Pa. 



SACO-LOWELL SHOPS 



Textile Machinery 




COMPLETE COTTON MILL EQUIPMENT Including 

Pickers, Cards Drawing, Evener Drawing, Roving, Spinning, 
Twisters, Slashers, Spoolers, Reels, Winders, Warpers. 

WORSTED MACHINERY Including 

Revolving Creels, Gill Boxes, Drawing Frames, Cap, Ring and 
Flyer Spinning and Twisting Frames, Jack Spoolers. 

SPUN SILK MACHINERY Including 

Spreader, Filling Engine, Drawing Frame, Fly Frames, Spinning, 
Spooler, Gassing, Trap Spooler. 

COMPLETE WASTE RECLAIMING MACHINERY 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 



77 Franklin Street, BOSTON, MASS. 

SHOPS 

Biddeford, Me. Newton Upper Falls, Mass. Lowell, Mass. 



Southern Agent: ROGERS W. DAVIS, Charlotte, N. C. 




Plant of 
Woonsocket 
Machine and Press 
Company, 
Woonsocket, R. I. 



For more than a generation mill men have placed 
the utmost confidence in the dependability of 

Woonsocket 

Pickers and Cards 
Roving and Drawing Frames 

Write for Illustrated Booklets 

Woonsocket Machine & Press Company 



SHOPS: 
Woonsocket, R. I. 



Southern Representative, J. H. MAYES, 
Independence Bldg., Charlotte, N. C. 




WHITINSVILLE 
SPINNING RING CO. 

WHITINSVILLE, MASS. 



Cotton Goods 



that can be woven with 
one shuttle can and 
should be w^oven on 



Northrop 



Trade-Mark Registered 



Looms 



Draper Corporation 

Hopedale Massachusetts 

Southern Office 
188 South Forsyth Street Atlanta Georgia 



Copyright I 916 by Draper Corporation 



AMERICAN 

^TEEL SPLIT PULLEY 

Efficient — with a reputation 

Light strong steel-constructed to minimize air resistance — arms edge on 
to cut the air saves enormously in power. Grooved air space diminishes 
air cushion under belt — a parting pulley — not necessary to strip shaft. 
Interchangeable parting bushings to fit different sizes of shafts. 
"American" pulleys transmit maximum of belt pull with minimum belt 
slip. Save coal or current cost — endure greater 
speed and stand up under greater strains than 
other standard metal pulleys. 

A reputation based on the efficient performance of 
over Three Million pulleys sold in past twenty years. 




Write us today for full information 
and prices on this standard of steel 
pulleys. No obligation, of course. 

AMERICAN PULLEY COMPANY 

Main Office and Works : 

Philadelphia 

New York Boston Chicago Seattle 



Sellers Service 

Power Transmission Machinery 



H 



A 
D 
E 
L 



H 




N 



D 



B 
O 



T 
O 



N 



Wm. Sellers & Co., Inc 




Wool Washer 
and Agitating 
Table Dryer 











Main Bowl and Settling Tank Separated 

also have 

Deep Self-Cleaning Hopper Bottoms 




NO WIRE APRONS ALL STEEL 

Agitation Gives Uniform Treatment of Stock 

ASBESTOS INSULATION 

An Unequaled Combination for the Most Efficient 

Washing and Drying of Wool 

JAMES HUNTER MACHINE CO. 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS. 



LEIGH & BUTLER 

232 Summer Street -:- BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Agents in United States and Canada for 

PLATT BROS. & CO., (Ltd.) 

Cotton, Woolen and French System Worsted Machinery 

S. A. Mules for Worsted, Wool, Cotton and Waste 

Special Machinery for the Manufacture 

of Yarns from Cotton Waste 

Also 

MATHER & PLATT, (Ltd.) 

Equipment of complete works for BLEACHING, CALICO 

PRINTING, DYEING AND FINISHING 

Patent Mechanical FILTERS for Town Supplies and all 

Industrial Purposes 



EDWARD JEFFERSON 

IMPORTER OF 

WORSTED MACHINERY 

117-123 So. Second Street PHILADELPHIA 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

TAYLOR, WORDSWORTH & CO., Leeds, England 

HALL & STELLS, Keighley, England 

KNOWLES & CO., Bradford, England 

GEORGE HODGSON, Ltd., Bradford, England 

Second Hand Machinery Bought or Sold 



Worsted Mills equipped from the wool to the finished cloth 



WILLIAM FIRTH FRANK B. COMINS 

President " V. Pres. & Treas. 

American IVIoistening Company 

OFFICE 
JOHN HANCOCK BUILDING 

120 Franklin Street - BOSTON, MASS. 

HUMIDIFIERS 

For Moistening tlie Air and Maintaining a Proper Condition in the 

Departments of the Textile Manufacture, Printing Offices, Tobacco 

Works, Leatiier Factories, and all places where 

Artificial Moisture is desired. 



AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF MOISTURE AND HEAT IS 

RECOMMENDED NO MATTER WHAT MAY BE 

THE HUMIDIFYING SYSTEM EMPLOYED. 

The Automatic Controller 

we install is a practical and dependable instrument of precision, 
that will control the humidity and heat of a room with a variation 
of less than I'/i per cent of relative humidity, no matter what may 
be the climatic conditions. 

While extremely sensitive to variations in the atmosphere, and 
very delicate in its control, still, at the same time, it is abso- 
lutely positive in operation, and entirely reliable under any 
and all conditions. 

It "feels" or "senses" the temperature and moisture of the 
air. 

Over 1,000 users of our System bear testimony to Superiority and 

Efficiency of our equipments. 

Our COMINS SECTIONAL HUMIDIFIERS 

Our FAN TYPE and HIGH DUTY HUMIDIFIERS 

Our VENTILATING Type of Humidifier. (Taking fresh air into 

the room from the outside.) 
Our ATOMIZER or COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM 
Our COMPRESSED AIR CLEANING SYSTEM 
Our CONDITIONING ROOM EQUIPMENT 
Our AUTOMATIC HUMIDITY CONTROL. (Can be applied 

to systems already installed.) 
Our AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL 

ARE ALL STANDARD OF MODERN TEXTILE 
MILL EQUIPMENT 

Write for References and Testimonials. 

VIII 



"PROCTOR" DRYING MACHINES 

Apron Troubles Overcome by the INTERLOCKING CHAIN CONVEYOR 



/; needs no adjustment ' 




Built of Metal 



Yarn Dyers Stock Dryers 

Scouring Machines Carbonizing Outfits 
Hosiery Dryers Ventilating Fans 



PHILADELPHIA TEXTILE MACHINERY CO. 

Sixth Street and Tabor Road :: PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SCHAUM & UHLINGER 

INCORPORATED 
Manufacturers of all Kinds of 

NARROW FABRIC LOOMS 




Glenwood Ave. and 2d St. 



Looms for 
Weaving Ribbons 

Silk and 

Cotton Tapes 

Gimps, Webbing, 
Labels, Asbestos 
Brake Lining, Etc. 

PHILADELPHIA 



CHARLES BOND COMPANY 

Textile Mill Supplies 



THE "BOND" PATENT LEATHER LUG-STRAP 




Manufacturers 
of 

OAK 
TANNED 
LEATHER 
BELTING 



CARRIER BRUSH. This brush guaranteed not to come apart 



520 ARCH 
STREET 

Philadelphia 
Pa., U. S. A. 




Patented January, 1903 



EDWIN I. ATLEE 

President and Treasurer 



GEORGE WOOD 

Vice-President 



R. H. MORRIS 

Secretary 



PHILADELPHIA MANUFACTURERS 

Mutual Fire Insurance Company 

COMMERCIAL TRUST BUILDING 

15th and Market Streets, Philadelphia 



DIRECTORS 



GEORGE WOOD, 

Tlie Millville Manufacturing Co., Millville 
N. J. 
THEODORE C. SEARCH, 

Cold Spring Bleaching and Finishing Works, 
Yardley, Pa. 
JACOB DISSTON, 

Henry Disston & Sons, Inc., Philadelphia. 
SAMUEL B. STINSON, 
. Philadelphia. 
JONATHAN CHACE, 

Samoset Company, Providence, R. I. 
JOHN R. FREEMAN, 

President Manufacturers, Rhode Island and 
State Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, 
Providence, R. I. 

This Company is a member of the New England Factory Mutual Association, a combination 
of manufacturers to insure themselves, which offers the strongest contract of indemnity to each 
member at absolute cost — subject to minimum of expense. 



EDWIN I. ATLEE, 

President and Treasurer of Company. 

CHARLES W. ASBURY, 

The Enterprise Manufacturing Co. (of Pa.), 
Philadelphia. 

GRAHAME WOOD 

George Wood, Sons & Co., Philadelphia. 

SAMUEL M. VAUCLAIN, 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, Philadelphia. 

WALTER H. ROSSMASSLER, 

Sauquoit Silk Manufacturing Co., Phila. 

LOUIS J. KOLB, 

Kolb Bakery Company, Philadelphia. 

WALTER ERBEN, 

The Erben-Harding Co., Philadelphia. 



COLUMBIA TOWEL MILLS 

W. H. & A. E. MARGERISON & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Martex Turkish Towels and Bath Rugs 

JASPER and HUNTINGDON STS. 
PHILADELPHIA 

77 FRANKLIN ST., NEW YORK 
BOYLSTON MILLS 

WARD, MEEHAN CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TURKISH TOWELS and BATH RUGS 

LEHIGH AVE., HOWARD and HOPE STS. 
PHILADELPHIA 

91-93 WORTH ST., NEW YORK 

The New & Better San-KNIT-ary Towels 

IN SEALED GERM-PROOF PACKETS: NEVER SOLD IN BULK 

You will never know the real luxury of a bath until you have used 

"San-KNIT-ary" TOWELS 

Send us One Dollar ($1.00) in Cash, Bank Draft, or Stamps, and we will send 
you, all charges prepaid : 

ONE HEAVY BATH TOWEL, Large Size 
ONE HEAVY BATH TOWEL, Medium Size 
TWO FACE TOWELS and a WASH CLOTH 
Use the articles for a week ; then if you are not thoroly satisfied, you may return 
them and we -will promptly and cheerfully refund your money. Send the dollar today 

Address: San-KNIT-ary TEXTILE MILLS, Inc., PHILADELPHIA 

San-KNIT-ary Fabrics are free from starch, sizing, etc., and are ready to use with- 
out first washing. 

NELSON KERSHAW 

CLIFTON HEIGHTS, PA. 



Manufacturer of '■ ' 1*1 ^T^ 1 

HIGH GRADE lUTklSh I O We IS 



Selling Agents WARNER GODFREY CO. ^Te'S." 'tSRK 



RUSCH & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1827 

387-393 Fourth Ave., Cor. 27th St. 
NEW YORK 

Dry Goods 
Commission Merchants 

MANUFACTURERS' and AGENTS' ACCOUNTS FINANCED 



a. j. cameron & co. 
Worsted Yarns and Tops 

FOR WEAVING AND KNITTING 

Kensington and E. Glenwood Avenues 184 Summer Street 

PHILADELPHIA BOSTON 



Commission Worsted Spinning 

GEO. W. LEFFERTS & CO., Inc. 

3rd and Moore Streets Philadelphia, Pa. 



Boston Office Philadelphia Office 

232 Summer Street 108 S. Front Street 



WM. H. GRUNDY & CO. 

Top Makers and 
Worsted Spinners 

FOR 

Men's Wear, Dress Goods and Knitting Trade, 
both in Grey and Mixtures 



DYERS 

SPINNERS 

TWISTERS 

PENN 
WORSTED COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SILK 
Let us solve your WORSTED 

Twist Problems COTTON 



Alfred Wolstenholme & Son, inc. 



SPINNERS OF- 



WORSTED and 
WORSTED MERINO 

YARNS 

FOR WEAVING 
AND KNITTING 



SELL DIRECT 
French and 
Bradford Systems 



OFFICES AND MILL 

Allegheny Ave. and 24th St. 
PHILADELPHIA 



HOWLAND CROFT, SONS & CO. 

Linden Worsted Mills 




Manufacturers of 



Worsted Yarns 



in the Grey and in all Colors 

Office and Mills : Broadway and Jefferson Ave. 

JOHN W. CROFT .^««-.-^.— _. -., .— * • / ■ ■= »-»c? ^"V/ 

GEORGE M. CROFT CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 

SAMUEL G. CROFT >—^^iv« ■--'■- i ^ 9 i ^ »-▼ » -^ 



WILLIAM H. STAFFORD MORTON O. STAFFORD 

STAFFORD & CO. 

Spinners of Carpet and Rug Yarns 



LITTLE FALLS MILL 

KRAMS AVENUE and SILVERWOOD STREET 

MANAYUNK, PA. 



WILSON H. BROWN 

cTWANUFACTURER 

W^OOL AND MERINO YARNS 

32 AND 34 STRAWBERRY STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



MARK D. RING'S SON & CO. 



SPINNERS OF 



Woolen and Merino 
Yarns 

For Weaving and Knitting 
3rd and Somerset Streets Philadelphia 



C. H. MASLAND 
& SONS, Inc. 



Rugs and Carpets 



"AMBER MILLS" 

AMBER, WESTMORELAND, WILLARD and COLLINS STS. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



I. Reifsnyder Son 
CS, Company 



PHILADELPHIA 
and BOSTON 



Wool— Noils— Waste 




In the gray, fancy shades, twists, mixtures, both VIGOUREUX and blends 

WARNER J. STEEL 

Siiccessur to 
EDWARD T. STEEL & CO. 
Mills and Office BRISTOL, PA. 



BORNE, SCRYMSER COMPANY 

ESTABLISHED IN 1874 

OILS and GREASES 

FOR TEXTILE MACHINERY 

Oils for Wool Batching 

Cylinder Oils 
Engine Oils Dynamo Oils 

Loom Oils Spindle Oils 

Apron Oils 

Knitting Oils 

Main Office: No. 80 SOUTH ST., NEW YORK 

BOSTON PHILADELPHIA 

WORKS AT ELIZABETHPORT, NEW JERSEY 




Crompton & Knowles 

LOOM WORKS 




Crompton & Knowles Dobby Silk Loom 



BUILDERS OF 



Plain andFancy Looms 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 



General Office: WORCESTER, MASS. 

WORKS: Worcester, Providence, Philadelphia 



SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



OF THE 



PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



BROAD AND PINE STREETS 
PHILADELPHIA 



CIRCULAR 



OF THE 



Philadelphia Textile School 

• THIRTY-FOURTH SEASON 

1917-1918 



Circular of the School of Apphed Art may be had on application 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Officers and Trustees 3 

Committees 4 

Calendar — School Year 7 

Staff 9 

Historical Sketch 11 

Athletic and Social Features 24 

Requirements for Admission 24 

Scholarships 25 

Tuition Fees and Other Expenses 26 

Payments 27 

Deposits 27 

Hours of Study 28 

Examinations and Certificates 29 

Diplomas and School Honors 30 

Tools and Materials 33 

Board 34 

Equipment 35 

Courses of Study, Day School : 

Regular Textile Course 43 

Cotton Course 63 

Wool and Worsted Course 67 

Silk Course 71 

Jacquard Design Course 75 

Chemistry, Dyeing and Printing 83 

Courses of Study, Evening School 93 

Donations 108 

Partial List of Former Students, with Their Occupations 110 



^ OFFICERS FOR 1917 

^-^ President 

^ THEODORE C. SEARCH 

I -^ Vice-Presidents 

"^JOHN STORY JEXKS JOHN G. CARRUTH 



-,3 Treasurer Assistant Treasurer 

J JAMES BUTTERWORTH JAMES L. ALLAN 

Q^' Secretary and Principal of the Schools 

LESLIE W. MILLER 
^VftSchool of Applied Art) (Philadelphia Textile School) 



I,^ Director of the Museum in Memorial Hall, Fairmount Park 

^ (X'acancy) 

^ Counsel 

Go FRANKLIX SPEXCER EDMOXDS, ESQ. 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



~ Ex-Officiis 

^ The Governor of the State The Mayor of the City 

^ By Appointment 

,— ? James Butterworth, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Harrington Fitzgerald, Appointed by House of Representatives. 
j;^ Charles H. Harding, Appointed by Select Council. 
I) John G. Carruth, Appointed by Common Council. 
--' Edward T. Stotesbury, Appointed by the Commissioner of Fair- 
mount Park. 



q: 



Elected by Members 

Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs 

Charles Bond John W. Pepper 

John Gribbel Walter H. Rossmassler 

Mrs. Henry S. Grove Theodore C. Search 

Thomas Skelton Harrison Edgar V. Seeler 

John Story Jenks Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 

GusTAv Ketterer James F. Sullivan 

John H. McFadden William Wood 

John D. McIlhenny 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN TO 
THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

MRS. RUDOLPH BLANKENBURG, President 

MISS NINA LEA, First Vice-President 

COUNTESS OF SANTA EULALIA, Second Vice-President 

MRS. HENRY S. GROVE, Secretary 

MRS. JOSEPH F. SINNOTT, Treasurer 

Mrs. Edwin Swift Balch Mrs. Robert R. Logan 

Mrs. Jasper Yates Brinton Mrs. Howard Longstreth 

Mrs. John H. Brinton Mrs. Arthur V. Meigs 

Mrs. William T. Carter IMrs. James Mifflin 

Miss Margaret Clyde Mrs. Francis F. AIilne 

Mrs. Henry Brinton Coxe Mrs. Thornton Oakley 

Miss Ada M. Crozer Mrs. Charles Platt, 3d 

Mrs. David E. Dallam Mrs. Percival Roberts,, Jr. 

Miss Cornelia L. Ewing Mrs. Thomas Roberts 

Mrs. George H. Frazier Mrs. C. Shillard-Smith 

Mrs. William D. Frishmuth Miss Mary E. Sinnott 

Mrs. William W. Gibbs Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson 

Mrs. C. Leland Harrison Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 

Mrs. John Harrison Mrs. William H. Walbaum 
Miss Margaretta S. Hinchman Mrs. A. B. Weimer 

]Mrs. F. K. Hipple Mrs. John Wister 

AIrs. J. L. Ketterlinus Mrs. Jones Wister 

Honorary 
Mrs. M. Hampton Todd 

COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTION 

Theodore C. Search, Chairnian ; 
Charles Bond Mrs. F. K. Hipple 

Thomas Skeltox Harrison ]Miss Nina Lea 

John Story Jenks Mrs. Arthur V. AIeigs 

John D. McIlhenny Mrs. Thomas Roberts 

Edgar V. Seller Mrs. C. Shillard-Smith 

James Sullivan Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 

William Wood Mrs. John Wister 

Mrs. John Harrison Mrs. Jones Wister 

Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg, Ex-Officio 

MUSEUM COMMITTEE 

John Story Jenks, Chairnian John W. Pepper 
Thomas Skelton Harrison Edgar V. Seeler 

Gustav Ketterer Mrs. W. T. Carter 

John H. McFadden Mrs. Wm. D. Frishmuth 

John D. McIlhenny AIrs. John Harrison 

Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury 
]\Irs. Rudolph Blankenburg, Ex-Officio 
(Vacancy) — Director of the Museum 
Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson, Assistant Curator and Lecturer 
The President is, ex-officio, a member of all Committees 



ADVISORY BOARD 



The following well-known manufacturers constitute membership of the 
Advisory Committee, which exercises a general supervision over the several 
branches included in the course of study: 

JOHN R. BEATTY, of Robert Beatty & Co., Philadelphia, Manufacturers of 
Fine Combed Hosiery Yarns. 

CHAS. BOND, of Chas. Bond Co., Philadelphia, Textile Mill Supplies and 
Power Transmission Equipment. 

H. n. BOS\VORTH, President of Helaine Mills Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 
Manufacturers of Fine Worsted Fabrics. 

E. K. BREADY, Manufacturer of Cotton and Wool Novelty Dress Goods. 

WM. BURNHAM, President and Treasurer of Standard Steel Works, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

HARRY E. BUTTERWORTH, of H. W. Butterworth & Sons, Philadelphia, 
Manufacturers of Bleaching, Dyeing, Printing, Drying and Finishing 
Machinery. 

RICHARD CAMPION, Philadelphia, Worsted Yarns. Selling Agent for 
Bristol Worsted Mills, Highland Worsted Mills and French Worsted Co. 

JOHN G. CARRUTH, Manufacturer of Woolen Cassimeres, Dress Goods, 
Worsted Suitings, etc. 

BENTON DORNAN, of Dornan Bros., Philadelphia, Manufacturers of Carpets, 
Art Squares, etc. 

WALTER ERBEN, ^^ of Erben, Harding Co., Manufacturers of Fine 

CHARLES HARDING. ^' Worsted Alohair, Merino and Genapped Yarns. 

WILLIS Ff^EISHER, Firm of Shelbourne Mills Co., Philadelphia, Manu- 
facturers of Worsted Men's Wear. 

B. W. FLEISIIER, of S. B. & B. W. Fleisher, Philadelphia, Worsted and 
\\'ool Spinners and Braid Manufacturers. 

ALBERT FOSTER, President of Firth and Foster Co., Philadelphia, Dyers 
and Finisliers. 

WiM. T. GALEY, JR., Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa., Manufacturers of 
Fine Fancy Cotton Shirtings, Ginghams, Madras, Leno and Novelty 
Fabrics. 

JOS. R. GRUNDY, of the firm of Wm. H. Grundy & Co., Bristol, Pa., Top 
Makers and Worsted Spinners. 

THOS. S. HARRISON, formerly of Harrison Bros., Philadelphia, Manufac- 
turing Chemists. 

GEO. C. IIETZEL, of Geo. C. Hetzel & Co., Chester, Pa., Manufacturers of 
Worsted and Woolen Suitings and Dress Goods. 

GEORGE H. HODGSON, Agent, Cleveland Worsted Mills, Cleveland, Ohio, 
The Rowland and Fern Rock Worsted Mills, Philadelphia, Pa., Manu- 
facturers of Ladies' Dress Goods, Men's Suitings, Plain and Fancy. 



GEORGE IR'TCIIIXS. formerly General Superintendent, Crompton & Knovvles 
Loom Works, Worcester, Mass.; Providence, R. I., and Philadelphia. 

EDWARD JEFFERSON, Firm of Edward Jefferson, Philadelphia, Pa., Im- 
porter of Worsted Machinery. 

JOIIX STORY JEXKS, formerly of Randolph & Jenks, Philadelphia, Manu- 
facturers of Plain and Fancy Cottons. 

H. S. LANDEU., formerly General Manager, Anglo-American Cotton Products 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

WM. L. LYAEL. Treasurer, Brighton Mills, Passaic, X. J., Manufacturers of 
Automobile Tire and Special Fabric. 

JOHN H. McFADDEN, of the firm of Geo. H. McFadden & Bro., Philadelphia, 
Cotton Brokers. 

THEODORE MILLER, of the firm of Stead, Miller & Co., Philadelphia, 
Drapery and Upholstery Manufacturers. 

WILLIAM C. ROBB. Philadelphia Representative of Farbwerke Iloechst Co., 
New York, N. Y.. (.formerly H. A. Metz Co.). 

EDWARD ROSSMASSLER, ) . ,, ^ ., ^n Ar^r r -pi •, i , u- 

WALTER ROSSMASSLER, } ^^ ''^^ ^^n,,uo.t S.Ik Mfg. Co., Phdadelphia. 

( of Schaum & Uhlinger, Philadelphia, ^Manufacturers 
OilO SLHALM. j qj- Weaving ^Machinery for all kinds of Narrow 



W. H. ROMETSCH, ( p^i^^cs. 



MITCHELL STEAD, Superintendent of Folwell Bros. & Co., Philadelphia, 
Manufacturers of Coat Linings, Fine Dress Goods, etc. 

JAMES STEWART. Superintendent of Caledonian Mills Co., Clifton Heights, 
Pa., Manufacturers of Cheviots and Cassimeres. 

WALTER SYKES, of the firm of Sykes Bros., Philadelphia, Manufacturers 
of Carpet Yarns. 

ALBERT TILT, Secretary and Treasurer of the Phcenix Silk Mfg. Co., 
Allentown, Pa. 

J. P. WOOD, of Wm. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Manufacturers of Woolen 
Cassimeres, Cheviots, L'nions, Serges, etc. 



CALENDAR-SCHOOL YEAR 1917-1918 



SEPTEMBER 
Thursdaj', 20th — Examination for Admission to Day Classes. 

Friday, 21st, ) , • • t^ 

o ^ J ooj ( Registration Days. 

Saturday, 22d, \ * •' 

Monday, 24th — Sessions of Day Classes begin. 

Wednesday, 26th, 7 P. M. — Registration of Students in Evening 

Classes. 

OCTOBER 
Monday, 1st — Sessions of Evening Classes begin. 

NOVEMBER 

Thursday, Friday, ) „, , . . tt r i c^i .i -i c«^ 

- -^ '-Thanksgiving Holidays, School closed. 

Saturday, \ 

DECEMBER 
Monday, 24th, ) 

to - Christmas Holidays. School closed. 

Saturday, Jan. 5th, Inc., ) 

JANUARY 
Monday, 7th — School re-opens. 

FEBRUARY 
Friday, 22d — Washington's Birthday. School closed. 

MARCH 
Wednesday, 27th — Sessions of Evening School end. 
Good Friday, ]\Iarch 29th, ) 

to I Easter Holidays. School closed. 

Monday, April 1st, inclusive, \ 

APRIL 
Tuesday, 2d — School re-opens. 

•-■• MAY 

Thursday, 23d — Annual Commencement and Exhibition. 

7 



STAFF OF THE TEXTILE SCHOOL 



E. W. FRANCE, 
Director of Textile School. 

Lecturer on Raw Materials, Processes and Fabrics. 

BRADLEY C. ALGEO, 

Assistant Director, and Professor in Charge of Weave Formation, Analysis and 
Strncture of Fabrics. 

RICHARD S. COX, 

Professor in Charge of Jacqnard Design, Drawing and Color Work 

SIDNEY L. KAPP, CARL MAJER, 

Assistant Instructor in Jacqnard De- Instrnctor in Frce-Hand Drawing 
sign and Color Jl'ork. and Figured Design 

L. DA COSTA WARD, 

Professor in Cliarge of Chemistry and Dyeing. 

ELMER C. BERTOLET, 

Distructor in Dyeing and Printing. 

W. A. WALTER, PERCIVAL THEEL, 

Instructor in Chemistry. Instrnctor in Chemistry. 

JOHN LOCKWOOD, ■ 

Instructor in Charge of Wool Carding and Spinning, 
Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 

STANLEY H. HART, ELWOOD B. WRIGHT, 

Instructor in Charge of Cotton Card- Assistant in Jl'ool Carding and Spill- 
ing and Spinning, and Lecturer ning. Worsted Draining and 
on "Raw Materials" of the Spinning. 
Wool Industries. 

WILLIAM PEEIFEER, 

Instructor in Charge of Power Weaving and Related Branches. 

WM. A. McLAIN, JOHN NAAB, 

Instructor in Charge of Elementary Instructor in Charge of Silk Mann- 

Weaving and Related Branches. facturing and Hosiery Knitting. 

FRANK L. GIESE, 

Assistant in Weave Formation, Analysis and Structure of Fabric. 

CASEMIR J. MEKSZRAS, HAROLD MOORE, 

Assistant in Power Weaving and Assistant in Elementary Weaving 

Related Branches. and Related Branches. 

ALFRED BURHOUSE, 

Instructor in Wool and Worsted Cloth Finishing. 

JAMES L. ALLAN, CLARA M. NACE, 

Registrar. Secretary. 



Historical Sketch 

of the 

Pennsylvania Museum and 

School of Industrial Art 



The Pennsylvania Museum and School 
Origin and Qf Industrial Art, an institution the orij^in 

Purpose ^ , . , , , . , . ^ 

of which was due to the uicreased mterest 
in art and art education awakened by the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion, was incorporated on the twenty-sixth day of February, 
1876, for the purpose, as stated in the charter, of establishing 
"for the State of Pennsylvania, in the City of Philadelphia, 
a Museum of Art in all its branches and technical applica- 
tions, and with a special view to the development of the 
Art Industries of the State, to provide instruction in Draw- 
ing, Painting, Modeling, Designing, etc., through practical 
schools, special libraries, lectures and otherwise." 

The purpose of the institution as thus 

Location of defined is distinctlv industrial. The col- 
Museum , 

lections at Memorial Hall, in Fairmount 

Park, where the Museum is located, embrace examples of 
art work of every description. It was determined by the 
founders to make the collections of the Pennsylvania 
Museum as largely as possible illustrative of the applica- 
tion of art to industry, and the instruction in the school has 
had constant reference to a similar purpose. 

In the selection of objects, the trustees 
Source of j-^^^| |-|-,g benefit of the advice of the foreisfn 

Original . . . . 

Collection Commissioners to the Exhibition, and, in 

several instances, the institution was the 

recipient of valuable gifts from individual exhibitors. 

Around the nucleus thus formed, the Museum has grown 

11 



by purchase, gift and bequest to its present proportions, 
numbering in its collection upwards of 30,000 objects. 

The Museum possesses several special 
^^f^'^^ collections, sufficiently complete in them- 

Additions - '■ 

selves to be regarded as representative of 
the departments to which they belong. Of these, the collec- 
tion of American pottery, made by Air. Edwin A. Barber; 
the collections of coins and medals ; the collections of 
Etruscan and Greco-Roman Pottery ; the John T. Morris 
collection of glass ; a collection of mediaeval wrought iron 
and the collection of textiles, are perhaps the most important. 
The Aluseum is visited by about 500,000 persons a year. 

The School was opened during the 
?he"schooi ^^''"ter of 1877-78, in temporary quarters, 

at Broad and Vine Streets, in the building 
since known as Industrial Hall. It was removed in 1879 to 
the rooms of the Franklin Institute, at 15 South Seventh 
Street, and again, in 1880, to the building 1709 Chestnut 
Street, where it remained until its removal, in 1884, to 1336 
Spring Garden Street. 

The munificent gift of $100,000, by 
scholr °* ^^^- ^^'"^- ^^'eightman, and the generous 

response of the public of Philadelphia to an 
appeal for assistance, by which a like amount was raised 
by popular subscriptions during the spring of 1893, enabled 
the institution to acquire the magnificent property at the 
northwest corner of Broad and Pine Streets, which it occu- 
pies at present. The property, with a front of 200 feet on 
Broad Street and 400 feet on Pine Street, is by far the most 
spacious and most advantageous in its location of any estab- 
lishment in America that is devoted to the uses of a school 
of art, situated as it is on the principal street and in the very 
heart of the city. 

Up to the time of the removal to Spring 
First Courses Garden Street, the work of the classes was 

of study r 1 

General Only coufiued to the general courses in Drawing, 
I'ainting and ^Modeling, with constant regard 
12 



to tlu' lUH'ds of tlir iiiihi>lrii,'S. l)Ul witliDUl allcMUpting to 
provicU- iiislnictidii in aiu' nl llir Dcmiialions llu-mselves. 

Tlu' n(H;r>sil\- ni aflurdiiiL;' facilities for sucli technical 
instrncliim, li(i\\c\aT, became apparent ycvv earl_\- in the 
hi^li)r\- of the Scliool. It was seen tliat onl\' l)v faniiharizing 
the stu(lent> with the processes and in(histrial ai)plications 
of design conld the pro])i-r (hrection l)e s^'iven to such purely- 
artistic training' as the Scliool had to oiler. 

Applied Design and Wood Carving 
Additions were .added to the curricnluni in 18(S4, and 

to the 

Curriculum the I'liiladelphia 1 exlik' School was organ- 

ized in the same year. The Department of 
Chenn'str\- and D\eing was added to the Textile School in 
1SS7. and the Class in Interior Decoration was added in 
1892, at which time the Class in Architectural Design was 
al>o organizi'd : ilie i )e])arlnu'nts of Wool Carding and Spin- 
ning and Cloth l''ini>hing were added to the Textile wSchool 
in 1894. that of I'otton Cardmg and S])inning in 1896. 
A Department of W'orstecl ^'arn .Manufacture was estab- 
lished in 1898, mid those of ALetal-Work aud Pottery to the 
Art School in 1903. 

The present organizaticjii of the School is as f(_)llows : 

1. School of Applied Art, comprising the departments of: — ■ 

I )ra\ving, Illustration, 

A])])lie(l Design, Decorative Sculpture, 

Xiirmal Art Instruetidu, Metal Work, 

\V(ii)(l Wdrk and I'arving, Decorative Painting, 

Pottery. Architectural Drawing and L^esign 

2. PiiiLADELPiHA TEXTILE ScHOOL, Comprising the depart- 
ments of : — 

Fakric .Structure and Design (cotton, wool, worsted, silk) 
Warii !'re])aratirin and \\'ea\ing. W'cKilen V;irn Manufacture, 
Color Theory and llarmony. Worsted N'arn Manufacture. 

Jacquard Design (figured work), ("otton \'arn Manufacture, 
Chemistr}-, Dyeing and I'rinting, Seamles> Hosiery Knitting, 
Wool and WOrstrd (loth I'inishing. 

IJ 



MEMBERSHIP IN THE CORPORATION 

The Trustees of the Pennsylvania ^Museum and School 
of Industrial Art desire the active co-operation of all iniblic- 
spirited citizens who are in sympathy with its work. 

The institution has only the nucleus of an endowment 
and depends for its support, in addition to the very mod- 
erate fees for tuition and appropriations from the City and 
State, on the dues of members of which there are four 
classes, viz : 

Patron Members in Perpetuity — Those who contribute 
the sum of $5,000 or more, whether in money or objects 
for the Museum. 

Fellowship Members in Perpetuity — Those who con- 
tribute $1,000 at one time. 

Life Members — Those who contribute the sum of $100 
or more at one time. 

Annual ^lembers — Those who contribute not less than 
$10.00 yearly. 

All members are entitled to the following benefits : 

The right to vote and transact business at the Annual 
Meeting. 

Invitations to all general receptions and exhibitions 
held at the Aluseum and the School. 

Free access to the Aluseum and School Libraries and 
admission to all lectures. 

Also a copy of each of the following publications : 

The Annual Report of the Corporation. 

The Annual Circulars of the School of Applied Art 
and the Philadelphia Textile School. 

The Art Handbooks and Art Primers, issued from time 
to time by the Museum. 

(A printed list of publications will be mailed to any 
member on application. ) 

The Illustrated Quarterly Bulletix of the ]\Iuseum. 

A list of members is published each year in the Annual 
Report. All persons who are in sympathy with the work 
of the institution will be cordially welcomed as members. 

Applications for membership, and remittances should 
be sent to the Secretary, Leslie W. Miller, at the School, 
Broad and Pine Streets, Phila(lel])hia, Pa. 
14 



•V-t 




L •• I 



PHILADfLPHlA TE>:riLE SCHOOL 
STUDENTS WORK 



'^^. 



Honors Received by the School for Exhibits of 
Students' Work at Expositions 

1SS4 — Thr world's Indnslrial LOttdii C cnlcnnial I^'xposi- 
liiiii, Xew ( frlcans : 

13ii)l()nia of I loiior. 

1893 — The World's Columbian l^x])osili()n, ( liica^o ; 
Jlililonia ot Monoi' — llron/A' .Me(lal. 

1895 — Cottrjii States and International l^xposiliDn. Atlanta, 
(.ieor,i,da : 

I )iplonia of Honor — ( lold Medal. 

1901 — 1 'an-.\nieriean l{x])osition, I Uillalo : 

I )il)Ionia iif Honor —SiK'er ATedal. 

1902 — South Carolina Interstate' and West Indian l^xposi- 
tior., Charleston : 

1 )i[)lonia of Honor — (jold Medal. 

1904 — T,ouisiana Purchase l^^xposition, St. Louis: 
Dild(jnKi of Honor — ( iold Medal. 

15 



PHILADELPHIA TEXTILE SCHOOL 

of the Pennsylvania Museum and 
School of Industrial Art 



The Philadeli)hia Textile School aims 
Purpose of |(, o-ive a technical education in all branches 

the School . ' .... ,. ... 11)01 

(li the textile nidustrv. < )rganized ni lbib4, 
its object iroiu the start has Ix-en to fit young men for 
positions of resi)onsibility in the manufacture and sale of 
textiles. The recent growth of the industry in this country 
has resultt'd not (>nl\- in a larger nunil)er of mills, but also 
in a great increase in the size of the establishments, and a 
corresponding development of division of labor and special- 
ization of production. This specialization has l)een carried 
so far that it has become virtually impossible for a general 
and comprehensive knowledge of the business as a whole 
to be obtained in the tvpical modern mill, and the young 
man who aspires to the possession of such knowledge must 
seek it elsewhere. It is apparent, then, tliat the causes 
which have so greatly increased the demand for the trained 
master, and those which have conspired to prevent his 
development in the mill itself, are one and the saiue, and the 
Textile School has come into existence simidv to meet the 
advancing requirements of the textile trade. 

!Men were selected as instructors not onlv on account 
of their iitness to teach, but l)ecause of their extensive and 
varied experience in a wide field of industr_\'. The School 
dr)es not aim to supi)lant practical exjierience. I)Ut it does 
claim to prevent waste of eii'ort in uniirofitable routine and 
to economize ettort 1)v pro]ierl_\- directing it. 

I'hiladehjhia i)Ossesses unequaled ad- 

Location ' ^ i 

vantages as a home for a textile school, 
ranking lirst among the AnuM'ican citit-s in the total manu- 

17 



facture of textiles. This is not only true of textiles as a 
whole, but the leading position which it holds in various 
lines of textiles testifies to the diversity as well as to the 
importance of its industries. 

The United States Census of 1914 gives the following: 

"The State of Pennsylvania contains textile establish- 
ments with an invested capital of $242,281,000. 

"Philadelphia's annual production of worsted yarns and 
fabrics is valued at $27,000,000 ; woolen yarns and fabrics 
valued at $15,000,000; carpets and rugs valued at $22,628,- 
000 ; cotton goods valued at $22,603,000 ; silk and silk goods 
valued at S8, 237, 000; hosiery and knit goods valued at 
$31,350,000. 

"Philadelphia contains 736 S])inning, weaving and knit- 
ting establishments ; upwards of 100 independent dyeing 
and finishing works; 128 raw^ w'ool dealers; 106 dealers in 
cotton, wool and w'orsted yarns ; 80 chemical and dyestutf 
firms ; as well as allied interests which contril)ute to its 
enormous production, embracing makers of machinery for 
spinning, weaving, knitting, dyeing, finishing, power trans- 
mission and mill supplies. 

"There are 55 prominent men's wear and dress goods 
commission houses and selling agencies in the city; 100 
jobbers in woolen, cotton and silk piece goods ; 189 whole- 
sale clothing and 104 women's suit and clothing manufac- 
turers." 

All of these, together with the large department stores, 
are, in themselves, educating factors of no mean importance. 
The opportunity of inspecting the ever-changing displays 
of these foremost retail establishments is of great value to 
the student, and is only one of the many advantages which 
a few years' residence in such a city is certain to possess for 
the ambitious student, apart from any immediate reference 
to the work of the school. 

Environment The importance of artistic efifect in tex- 

tile products cannot be overestimated, for 
it is this quality which first attracts the purchaser's attention. 
18 



The School's association with the School of Aj^jjlied x'Yrt 
• affords an twct-jitional <>]i]>(irtunit\- for training- in this all- 
im])ortant hranch of the work. The huiklinos of the Schools 
are situated on the same plot of ground, on one of Phila- 
delphia's main thoroughfares, in the heart of the city. The 
student may arrange for more or less artistic trainini,^ in 
accordance with the re(juirements of his course of stud\', hut 
in any event he works in an artistic atmosphere and prohts 
hy the refining- iuHuence which it exerts. 

Historical '^ '^^' I 'hiladelphia Textile School, as 

hefore noted, was organized in 1SS4. It 
represents the most important eff'ort which has vet heen 
made in America to organize the instruction in an Art 
School, with direct reference to its application to the actual 
needs of the Ti:xtilk Ixdi'strv. 

1 he dewlopment and realization of this purpose were 
accomplished through the generous co-operation and sup- 
port of the n]ost energetic and influential memhers of the 
Philadelphia Textile Association. 

This Association, formed in l.S,S2, had 
Influence ''^^'1*^ prominent among the ohjects for which 

it was created, the fostering of technical 
education. At that time, no thorough school existed in this 
country, and it was necessary to begin at the foundation 
of the work, without i)revious knowledge of the exact 
methods to be adopted, or means to be emploved to reach 
the desired end. 

The initiative in this, as well as the 

Mr. Search's , , i m i 

Initiative work above described, was taken by Mr. 

Theodore C. Search, who was President of 
the Textile Association, as well as Vice-President and Chair- 
man of the Committee on Instruction of the Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art. Indeed, he assuiued 
at tirst the entire financial responsibility of organizing and 
ccpiipping tlu' Textile School, and to his devoted and untiring 
service in its ])eha]f, from its first ince])tion to its i)resent 
high state of development, more than to all other agencies 

19 



combined, its success is due. Tliat the .Vssociatiou took the 
action that it did was mainly due to the example and leader- 
ship of Mr. Search and a few members who were, like 
him, fully alive to the iiupcjrtance oi the movement, notaljly, 
Mr. Thomas Dolan, Messrs. John and 
Support of fames Dol)S()n, Mr. W'ni. Wood, Mr. Wm. 

Manufacturers \ ,^ ^ , ., , ,, -i r t-- 

Arrott, i\lr. John ^ ewdall, Messrs. l^iss, 
Banes, Erber; i.^- Co., Messrs. Conyers lUitton cK: Co., Messrs. 
George and James Bromley, IMr. Seville Scholield, Alessrs. 
Alexander L'row & Son, Messrs. James Smith & Co., Messrs. 
^\. A. I'urbush iS: Son, Messrs. John liromley iS: Sons, Mr. 
Thomas L. J.eedom, Messrs. James Doak, Jr., (!:<: Co., Messrs. 
Charles Spencer tS: Co., Messrs. li. P)ecker & Co., Mr. 
Andreas Hartel, Mr. S. B. M. h'leisher, Messrs. (Jrundv 
Bros. i\; (,';unpi(»n, Messrs. II. W. I Uitterworth iS; Sons, and 
Messrs. Ste:id ^; Miller. 

, ^ .. The School aims to make the instruc- 

Instruction 

tion as ])ractical as ])OSsible without losing- 
sight of the fundamental ])rinciples which it is the main 
business of all education {o imi)art. The instruction consists 
of lectures and class exercises, of individual investigation 
and experiment, and the actual production of a great variety 
of textiles. These latter are ])rought out in commercial pvu- 
portions according to the student's ideas and in accordance 
with specifications which he has himself ])lanned in minute 
detail, the constant endeavor being to encourage originality 
and to direct research along prohtalde lines. 

Facilities ^^^'^ Institution possesses an extensive 

e(|tu'i)mcnt unsurpassed by that of any 
siiuilar institution in tlie world. It consists of the latest 
machinery for the manufacture of yarns, for weaving, finish- 
ing and (heing. All of these machines are of commercial 
proportions, not mere working models, and they turn out 
work such as is met with in the best markets of the day. In 
addition to this practical equipment the different dei)artments 
are provided with the a])paratus necessary for conducting 
scientific tests and examinations of fibres, yarns, fabrics, 

21 



dyestuft's. oils, waters, etc., with a view^ to locating the cause 
of possible defects. The buildings in which the School is 
housed are admirably suited to its purposes, affording light 
in quantities sufficient for the finest work, the top floors 
being skylighted throughout. 

The breadth of the School's scope is 

Scope ^ 

the factor to which is due the greatest 
measure of its success. Silk, cotton, wool and worsted are 
studied exhaustively, and while some of the courses of study 
are so arranged that a student may confine his attention to 
the particular fibre in which he is most interested, the 
Regular or Diploma Course includes work in all of the mate- 
rials mentioned above, allowing the student to specialize to a 
certain extent in the third year. Unquestionably the gradu- 
ate of this course is fitted for better work in any one of 
these materials, because of a knowledge of the peculiarities 
and processes involved in the others. The best time to 
specialize is after a broad foundation has been laid. 

TIic graduates iclio arc most successful are those zvho 
Jiavc taken this couil^rcJieiisiz'e course, even though they 
may not have pursued it for the three years w^hich its 
completion requires. 

The oroanization consists of two dis- 

Day and '^ 

Evening tiuct schools — day and evening. The course 

^'^*^^^* in the former requires the daily attendance 

of the pupil and involves a good deal of work outside of 
school hours, so that successful pursuit necessitates the giv- 
ing up of other duties, although students of special subjects 
may take partial time in the School and attend to outside 
duties at other times. 

The hours of the evening school are so few that the 
student's attention is necessarily confined to two or three 
subjects ; the studies are, therefore, largely elective, although 
earnest effort is made to group these electives in the most 
profitable manner. 

^^ ^ ^ The students of the dav school come 

students 

from all parts of the world. Some of them 
22 



have had ]M-actical (.■xperienct'. and otlicrs come directly from 
schools and ccjUci^n-s, the latter havin.i^ been largely repre- 
sented in recent years. The advantages of a good prelim- 
inary education in enabling the i)ossessor to obtain a quicker 
and better grasj) of principles and to develop them to better 
purpose, are. of course, very great, but bright men who have 
had mill experience often make admirable students even 
without the advantages of a high-school preparation. The 
students of the evening classes are, as a rule, enga"-ed in 
some form of textile work, either manufacturing or com- 
mercial. Many of them come from a considerable distance. 
The PJiUadclphia Textile School dein- 

Success of , J I 

Graduates oustrotcd the practical utility of technical 

education in textiles on this continent, and 
the steady growth of the Institution is due to nothiiuj else, 
so much as to the success of its graduates. 'The tiroad and 
thorough educational policy steadfastly adhered to hy those 
-ccho shape tlie School's character, has resulted in the gradua- 
tion of a body of young men xvho l>y reason of the breadth 
of their training luvve been enabled to enter all fields of the 
work, and to-day they are well and farorahly known in ererv 
textile section of any importance. 'They are in the mill, the 
dye-Iiousc, the conimission house, and the machine builders, 
and i^'herci'cr found they are proving themselves capable 
men and an honor to their alma mater. 

The School does not undertake to tind positions for its 
graduates, but incpu'ries for bright, energetic, well-trained 
men, are constantly being made, and it alfords the officers 
only pleasure to furnish the assistance to employer and 
graduate, which introduction implies. 

LECTURES 

In addition to the lectures in the regular course of in- 
struction, others are given from time to time on various 
topics bearing directly on the textile industries bv various 
well-known men of the country. The names of these lec- 
turers, their subjects and the dates of their lectures are 
duly announced during the term. 

23 



SOCIAL FEATURES 

The Art and Textile Club, to membership in which any 
member of School is eligible, is the exponent of the social 
and athletic side of the school life ; and is conducted and 
supported by and for the students. 

Its equipment includes a general club room with files of 
textile and other periodicals; tables for chess and checkers; 
also a shuffle board and pool tables. 

The membership fee is $3.00 a year, and is collected by 
the Registrar of the School from Textile dav students when 



1 




bi^Hr f r-~i 7 


P 


n 




■ 


1 


tr^ i 




1 


*'»VV 








il^^^r 




1 


1 








iK i 






1 



STUDENTS CLUB ROOM. 

registering for the year. Xight students are entitled to the 
privileges of the Club upon payment of £1.00 to either the 
Registrar or the Treasurer of the Club. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicarits for admission should be at least 18 years 
of age. All candidates are required to pass an entrance 
examination (no certificates accepted) to show that they are 
fully qualified to pursue profitably the work of their re- 
spective courses. 
24 



In general the in'eparalion necessary to enable an appli- 
cant to pursue success! ull\- either of the prescribed courses 
corresponds with that aftorded ])y High Schools or Acade- 
mies of the better grade, oti'ering a four-year course of 
study. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

I'.ntrance examinations mav be taken on Idiursday, 
June 21st, or Thursdax-, Septemljer loth, at 9 .V. ]\I. The 
examination usualK' takes the form of a written statement, 
such as a letter addressed to the Director or a descrii)tion of 
some topic witli which the applicant is familiar. 

The examination also cox'ers arithmetic, including frac- 
tions, decimals, s((uare root, ratio, proportion and per- 
centage. It is of the utmost importance that the students 
should possess a read\' command ot these subjects as they 
affect his school, and subseijuent textile life t(j a far greater 
extent than do the higher forms of mathematics. Idle at- 
tention of candidates from colleges and universities are 
especially directed to this fact, and a thtii'ough review of 
arithmetic is urged. 

I'roficiencx' in free-hand drawing, although not a 
recpiirement for a<lmission, is exceedingly desirable tor all 
textile studeiUs, \yhether their work be conhned to design, 
or has to do with mechanics and machine study. It has 
been found, howeyer, that owing to the limited opportunity 
for obtaining such ])roficiency during prej)aratory education 
and for other reasons, the average student has but slight 
abilitv in this line. J he excellent oi)i)ortunities aftorded by 
the evening drawing classes of the School of Api)lied Art, 
located in an adjoining building, are earnestly recommended 
t(j the attention of the thoughtful student. 

Note. — High School Inorganic Chemistry will not be accei)te(l as 
sufficient for exemption from first year Chemistry in this School. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

In consideration of an annual appropriation to the 
School by the Legislature of Pennsylyania, each county in 

25 



the State is entitled to at least one free scholarship in any 
department of the School for the full course of three years. 
Counties sending more than one Senator to the Legislature 
are entitled to as many scholarships as there are Senatorial 
districts. These appointments are made by the Governor of 
the State, usually on the recommendation of members of 
the State Legislature. 

Generous provision for free instruction in this institu- 
tion is also made by the Board of Public Education of the 
City of Philadelphia. Pupils of all the High and Manual 
Training Schools are eligible for these appointments, which 
are made by the Board of Education on the recommenda- 
tion of the Principals of the several schools, to whom all 
applications for them should be addressed. 

Any of the above scholarships are subject to recall at any 
time, if in the judgment of the Principal, the progress of the 
holder is unsatisfactory. 

A student who fails to attend regularly or to do the 
work of his class, receives notice to this effect and is warned 
that unless a marked improvement is shown at once, the 
scholarship will be declared vacant. 

If, however, at the expiration of a reasonable length of 
time his progress still continues to be unsatisfactory, he is 
notified that the scholarship has been forfeited. 

TUITION FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES 

d'he tuition fee for any one of the following Day 
Courses is S175 per year: 

The fee for students from Foreign Countries is $300 
per year. 



Regular Textile (Diploma) Course, see 


page 


43 . 


See Deposits, 


" Cotton Course, . . " 


" 


63 1 


page 27 


" Wool and Worsted Course " 


" 


68 ' 




" Silk Course, ..." 


" 


71 




Jacquard Design Course, . . " 


" 


75 1 


See Tools 


Chemistry, Dyeing and Priming 




) 


and Materials 


(Diploma) Course, ..." 


" 


83 / 


page 33 


26 









INCIDKNTALS 

A (Icpartnu'iital char^'e of vS13.0(3 for incidentals and 
(Iradnation \cv is niadr n]>on all sludmts whose course in- 
cludes ])raclical work in either ot the departments of Card- 
in,i;', Spinning;'. W I'axin^-. l'heniistr\-, Dnimul;-, I'rinting- or 
Knitting'. 

EVENING SCHOOL 

I'ees for either of the lA'enm^' School Courses, as men- 
tioned on ra,u;"e *^H. \-ar\- fi'om SIS.(H) to 825.00 accordinL^" to 
the character of the suhjecls included in the course (see 
"Deposits." i)a,L^e lOh). 

PAYMENTS 

.-/// fees iiini dc/^DSifs arc [^iiwthlr in adi'aiicc, and fees 
once paid re/// /;/ iin insUiiiee he refinided. e.veepl in ease of 
serious illness, and then only I'y speeiiil aetion of the Instruc- 
tion Coininittce. Students' tickets ari' issued on the pa\nient 
of fees, and students will not he permitted to enter an\- class 
tmtil the fees have heen i)aid and the ticket ohtained. I'er- 
sons who desu'e to reserx'e a place m a class 1)\' entering' 
hefore the openiui^' daw ma\' either pa\' the whole fee. or 
make a partial ]ia\-ment of vS2?. the halance heini; pawahle as 
al)( ive. 

DEPOSITS-Day Students 

All students of the 1 >a_\" School are re(|uiri'd to make, 
upon entering', a deposit t(» cowr ])reakai;"e, lahoratorv 
charges, or daniai^"e to school pro]iert\-. After deducting" 
such charges, the halance is rt'lurned at end of school \-ear. 

$1?.()0 is the general deposit for all courses, with the 
exception of the C'henu'slr\-, I )\eing audi rriuting course. 
The deposit for this latter course is S23. 00. 

LOCKER DEI'OSnS 

Students of the Hax' .School also niak'c a de])osit of $2 
tor a locker kt'\-, ot which amount ?{) cvni> is ri'fuuded upon 
the return of the ke\-, tlu' halance. Si. 30. heing retained as 
rental lor the ust- ot tlu' lockt'r. l\e\s will not he redeemed 
unless ])r(,'seuled within thirty days after the close of the 
current school \ear. 

27 



HOURS OF STUDY— Day Classes 

From Monday to Friday, inclusive, all classes are in 
session from 9 A. M. until 12 noon, and with the exception 
of the second and third year classes in Warp Preparation 
and Weaving", they are in session from 1 P. M. until 4 P. M. 
The afternoon sessions in the second and third year in Warp 
Preparation and Weaving continue until 5 P. M. The hours 
of study on Saturday are from 9 A. AF until 12 noon. 

The Second Year Regular, Second Year Wool and 
Worsted, and the third Year Regular Day Classes are also 
required to attend the course of lectures on Cloth Finishing 
and those on Wool Selecting, Grading, Sorting, Blending, 
etc., in accordance with announcements made during the 
year. 

DISCIPLINE 

It is assumed that students come to the School for a 
serious purpose and that they will cheerfully conform to 
such regulations as may he from time to time adopted by 
the Faculty. 

The organization and discipline of the School require 
from all students a strict observance of the following regu- 
lations : 

Punctual and regular attendance, polite and orderly 
conduct, constant and steady application to their allotted 
work in the various classrooms and laboratories, the return 
of all tools, materials, chemicals and apparatus in good 
order to their proper places before leaving the classrooms. 
Conduct inconsistent with the above, or with the general 
good order of the School, or persistent neglect on the part 
of the student to furnish or produce required work, or 
loitering in the hallways or wasting his time in any other 
manner, may be considered as sufficient grounds for dis- 
missal, without remission of fees — or if the offence be a 
less serious one, the student may be placed upon probation. 
The student so placed upon probation may be dismissed if 
guilty of any further offence. Schedules showing the ar- 
rangement of classes and the hours to be given by the 
28 



instructors to eacli arc posted in cfinspicuons places. Stu- 
dents must observe these schedules and may not claim the 
teacher's attention at other hours. 

It is the aim of the h\aculty to so administer the dis- 
cipline of the School as will encourage students to cultivate 
habits of stc-adv ai)]>lic;ition, self-control, as well as a high 
regard for honor and truth fulness. The attempt of anv 
student to i)ass an examination b\- impro])er means will Ije 
regarded as a most serious ott\'nce, and renders the olil'ender 
liable to imnu'diate ex])ulsion without further redress. 

No l)ook, chart, or other educational appliruice which 
is the property of the School, will be allowed to leave the 
building under an\- circumstances. 

REPORTS OF STANDING 

Reports of students' standing in all subjects taken in 
his course are made to parents and guardians quarterly. 
Idle abilitv of students to continue their courses is deter- 
mined in part by means of exanu'nations, but regularitv of 
attendance, and faithfulness to daily duties, are considered 
etpially essential. 

EXAMINATIONS 

General examinations are held in all branches each vear 
in January and in May, known as "midyear" and "final." 
Idle Januar^• examinations are usuallv confined to the work 
of the iirst half of the )-ear. ddie Alay examinations may 
cover the work of the whole year. 

XoTE. — Examinations for students conditiimcd in ]\ray in sub- 
jects of the first and second year are held on Monday preceding the 
September entrance examination, and for those students conditioned 
in January on the first week of March following. 

Students conditioned in any subject and tailing U> remove the 
condition at the time appointed, are not entitled to another examina- 
tion unless further time be allowed by s])ecial vote of Faculty. 

CERTIFICATE— Day School 

Certificates are awarded to sttidents who have com- 
pleted the first two years of the Regular Three "^'ear Textile 

29 



Day Course, or the first two years of the Regular Three 
Year Chemistry, Dyeing and Printing Courses, and to stu- 
dents completing any of the following Regular Two Year 
Day Courses : Cotton — Wool and Worsted — Silk — Jacquard 
Designing — on the following conditions : A degree of "Ex- 
cellent " "Good" or "Fair" must have heen attained for 
the work of the Course in each hranch taught in the respec- 
tive classes, and the final examination must have heen passed 
in a satisfactory manner. 

XoTE — I'ur evening-class certificate, see page 106. 

DIPLOMAS 

The Diploma of the School is awarded to students of 
the Three Year Regular Textile Day Course, and the Three 
Year Regular Chemistry, Dyeing and Printing Courses, who 
have obtained the certificate ofifered for the second year of 
the course, and who have completed their third vear's work 
in accordance with the conditions outlined under the head 
of certificates. 

XoTE. — Xo Student is eligible for promotion into an advanced 
class who has not completed the work of the preceding year, includ- 
ing the examinations, in a satisfactory manner. 

SCHOOL HONORS— Prizes 

The following prizes are ofifered for competition : 

To the (regular) Graduating Class: 

The Theodore C. Search Gold Medal. 

To earn this prize, the student must, in addition to having com- 
pleted the three years' regular course, and passed his examinations 
in an eminently satisfactory manner, have undertaken some special 
research into a matter relating to the textile industry, on the result 
of which, as expressed by a thesis or some practical result accom- 
plished, or both, the award will be made. 

Medal of the Xational Association of Cottox 
Manufacturers. 

The X'ational Association of Cotton Manufacturers of Boston 
offers a medal to be awarded to such member of the graduating 
30 



cla.ss of this Schoul as may l>r dcsi.nnatcd l)y a special cummittce 
appointed for this puri)ose, whd wih examine the resnUs of the 
\ear's work. The award will he hased upon the i^eneral excellence 
of the year's work, and w dl he deternnned jiartly hy an inspection 
of the fahrics produced hy the student, coupled witli the results of 
Preliminary and l-'inal i^xaminations, and ]iart]y h\ consultation oi 
the records of the student's diligence and [iro.gress during; the year 
as kept h}' his instructors. 

The II|':xk\- 1m<ii':i)]'.i-;rgkk ^^Fi-.MdRiAT. Prize. 

Ten dollars will he awarded to the student of the graduating 
clasi who ranks second in general excellence. 

Associate Coai.mittee of Women's Prize. 

Ten (hdlars. — To he awarded to the student of the third year 
legular day course producing the hest executed work in jaccjuard 
Design. 

The Textiei: A\^jred Jourx.vl Prize. 

Fifteen didlars. — To he awarded to the student of the third year 
day chemistry, dyeing and printin,g class graded as first honors in 
general excellence. 

The Textil]': WOrld Journ.vl Prize. 

Ten dollars. — To l)e awarded to the third year student of the 
evening scho(d chemistry ancl dyeing class who attains the highest 
rating for the full three-year course. 

The Tho.mas Seeeton II.vrrisoxX 1'rize. 

Ten d(dlars. — To 1)e awarded to the third year student of the 
evening schuol who attains the liighest rating for the full (lu'ee-year 
course in chemistry. 

To students i^'lio lui'c'c hccii in dl triuhincr at Irtist t:^'o years: 
The Miss Cevde Prfze. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded to the student of the second year 
regular day course ])rofhicing the hest executed work in jaeciuard 
Design. 

31 



The Joseph Elias Prize. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded to a member of the second year 
day silk class producing the best designed and woven Jacquard Silk 
Fabric. 

The John G. Carruth Prize. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded to the student of the second year 
day wool class attaining the highest rating for the year in general 
excellence. 

The Krout & Fjte ]\Ifg. Co. Pr]ze. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded to the student of the second year 
day cotton class attaining the highest rating for the year in general 
excellence. 

Mrs. Hexrv S. Grove Prize. 

Ten dollars — To be awarded to the day student producing the 
best specially designed and woven Jacquard Fabric. 

The Herbert D. Allman Prize. 

Ten dollars. — For the best practical color scheme for woven 
stuffs, including rugs and carpetings, to a member of the second 
year day class. 

To students ichi) Jia-c'c been in attendance one year: 

The Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott Prize. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded to the student of the first year 
day chemistry and dyeing class attaining the highest rating for the 
year's work. 

The Joseph Elias Prize. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded to the student of the first year 
evening Jacquard class attaining the highest rating for the 3'ear's 
work. 

The Delta Kappa Phi Fraternity Prize. 

Ten dollars. — To be awarded for the best general work executed 
on the Harness Loom, by a student of the first year day class. 

The Phi Psi Fraternity Prize. 

Ten dollars. — I'or best executed work in Color Harmony and 
Design. Open to members of first year daj- classes. 



Till-: Delta I'm I'si lui.VTKRNixY Prize. 

Ten dollars. — Fur general excellence in weave formation and 
fal)ric analysis. ( )i>en to nn^'mhers of lirst year day classes. 



WORK OF STUDENTS 

All lal tries woven in tin- .'school Ix'conu' the ])ro[)ertv of 
the instittition. The Sehool also reserves the right to retain 
one sjiecinien of eaeh stitdent's work in eaeh Itraneli stnched. 



SPECIMEN OE FABRICS PRODUCED BY STUDENTS. 






'T^W' 



mm im\ i's¥h ii#fi| Mj /»\ /!• 







II T .M. 



I'.l;.H AIM II SI l.K 1 N THKl' i; CO\ (il;s. 

Maile of pure dyed (irgaiiziiie warp, aiul Irani filling. 

All the details of manufacture, including designing, dyeing, warping am 

weaving, performed by the student. 



TOOLS AND MATERIALS 

The tools re(|ttire(l in the Iveynhir Conrse, Woolen 
Course and Cotton Cintrse are: A set of drawing instru- 
ments, a drawing lioard, a pair of pliers, a pair of scissors 
and a reed hrtok. All hooks, tools and also materials, stich as 
designing paper, paints, hrtrshcs, drawing hoards, (hrawing 
instruments, pencils, etc., are for sale in the School at less 

33 



than retail prices. The expense of these is usually about $25 
for the year. All students of the School are expected to 
provide themselves with a full suit of overalls. 

BOARD 

Good board may be obtained in the vicinity of the 
School for $7.00 a week and upward. A list of desirable 
boarding houses is kept at the School, and will be furnished 
on application to the Registrar. 












m 


^m^ 
























^ 












t 




1 








S 


t 




1 
















1 




'~? ■ ? 


I? 


1 








1 










U 1 B 
















z 
/ 


— n 



ir 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL WITH RELATION TO THE CITY HALL, RAILWAY 
STATIONS, ETC. 



34 



Equipment 



The School can now lay claim to an C(|uiijnicnt excelling 
that of any similar institntion. The numerous machines and 
appliances have hcen added from time to time as their neces- 
sity became apparent. W herever it was seen that a new 
apparatus would assist in the demonstration of a subject, 
that ap]>aratus was obtained, and where an improvement 
was made in machiner\- already in the School, either that 
imi)rovement was attached or the old machine was replaced 
b\- an entirely new one. Tn this manner, the institution has 
kept apace with the deyeloi)ment of the times, and we feel 







*siHSW5**sllH«i«H 



\%.\ 



SECTION OF WOOL CARDING AND SPINNING ROOM. 

assured that but a glance at the following wall reveal the 
opportunity for practical instruction which is afforded. 

WOOL PREPARING, CARDING AND SPINNING 
LABORATORIES 

The two rooms in wliicli tht- practical work of woolen yarn 
manufacfure is carried on are ni(_)St admirahl.N- laid (Hit for the ])ur- 
pose intended. One of the rooms is ck'X'oted to the dusting, Ijurr 
extracting- and mixing of the wools, which is accomplished by the 
use of the Win. Scholield improved willow, tlie C. C. Sargent's hurr 
picker and the Win. Sclmfield mixing ])icker. 'I"he other room is 
devoted to carding, spinning, twisting and reeling, d'he machinery 
employed consists of two sets of cards, one 4S-inch Inirhush, and the 
other 60-inch Gessner, Ijoth equipped with the latest-improved feeds 

35 



of the Apperly and Bramwell make; two small Torrance sampling 
cards for the making of fancy mixes ; a 400-spindle self-acting mule, 
Piatt pattern, Furbush make ; floor and traverse grinders, Furbush 
and Roy make. The finisher card of the Furbush set is equipped 
with the latest improved Barker apron rub motion, to which is 
attached the latest improved Chapman Electrical Xeutralizer. All 
the clothing in use on the above cards is from the American Card 
Clothing Company. The finisher card of the Gessner set has what is 
known as the strap dividing condenser. 

A 72-spindle latest improved trap twister, Lowell machine shop 
make, and a 36-inch combination yarn reel of the Lindsay, Hyde & 
Co. make. The room in which the preparing machines are installed 




MLlKiN OF WORSTED SPIXXING ROOM, SHOWIXl, WoRsTID SPINXI\(, FRAMES. 

is thoroughly equipped with the General Fire Extinguisher Com- 
pany's automatic sprinklers. 

WORSTED DRAWING AND SPINNING LABORATORIES 

"J"he four rooms devoted to this branch contain what is practi- 
cally known as one complete set of English open drawing and 
spinning machinery. The set is composed of 12 machines, which 
are not working models, but are typical of what are found in any 
well-equipped worsted mill. All of the above machines were made 
by the Lowell ^lachine Shop, Lowell, ]\Iass. In addition to the 

36 



foregdin.n, llu' (k-iiartmcnt c<ir.(aiiis twislin.u, spdoling, rfcling and 
liundlin.L; inachiiuTv of ci|uall\ Iii.i^h staiidanl. the makers being Fur- 
bush, Kaston l\; lluruham. Lindsay, Jrlyde & ( o., and A, W, Alien, 
respectively. The rooms are also equipped with a complete humidi- 
fying system, installed by the American Moistening ('ompany, 
lloston, A'fass. 
COTTON CARDING AND SPINNING LABORATORY 
'lliis, the third department mentioned for the manufacture of 
raw materials into yarns, contains a full line of machinery necessary 
for the proci'ssing of cotton into yarns of \-arying counts of fineness. 
.\II of this machinery was made es])ecially for the school by the 
following well-known makers, and is u|i to date in every respect. 
It consists of revolving flat card, railwax head and drawing frames 
from the .Saco eK; Pettee Alachine Works, .\ewton Ipper ImIIs, 
Mass.; slubbing and roving frames from the VVoonsocket Machine 
and Press Company, Woonsocket, R. ].; warp and fdling spinning 
frames from the b^ales cHi Jenks Machine ('o.. I'rovidence, K. 1., and 
Whitin Machine Works, VVhitinsxiJle, Mass.; self-acting mule, Piatt 
Bro. make, ( )ldham, luig. : si)ooling, twisting, reeling and band 
making machinery, from the l^aston & lUiniham Machine C'o. and 
Fales & Jenks Machine Co., FVovidence, R. I., and the I )raper Com- 
pany, Hopedale, Mass. The department is ful]_\ ecpupped with 
humidifiers from the American Moistening ('ompany, I'.oston, Mass. 

KNITTING LABORATORY 

This branch i^ carried on as an adjunct to the yarn-spinning 
department, and is calculated to lit the student to not only know the 
practical re(|uirements of plain knitting, but to be more fully com- 
petent to judge of the yarn required to produce the knitted article 
desired. 

The installation of machines consists of seven-eighths and full 
automatic knitters of the latest improved types. The following 
makes are represented: The ".Xational," from the National Knit- 
ting Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; the "Invincible," from the E. Jenckes 
Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R. 1.; the "Acme," from the Ma\-o Knitting 
Machine Co., l-'ranklin b'alls, X. H. ; the Acme Alayo, from West 
Branch Knitting Co., Milton, Pa.; the "Stanrlard," full automatic, 
from Standard Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa.; the "Banner," full 
automatic, from Hemphill Manufacturing ( o., Pawtucket, R. L; 
the Brinton "Model C." full automatic, from H. Brinton & Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa.; the Paxton & ( )'Xeill, three-quarter automatic, 
from Paxton & O'Xeill, and I'.ranson, seven-eighth automatic, from 
Branson ^Machine Co., Philadeljihia, Pa.; the "Pamb," from Lamb 
Knitting Machine Manufacturing Coni])any, Chicopee Falls, Mass.; 
"Kibbers," from l.'ranson Machine Co., and .Scott & Williams, Phila- 

37 



delphia, Pa., and McMichael & Wildman, Xorristown, Pa., and 
Brinton & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. ; "Underwear Machine with Craw- 
ford Stop Motion," from Scott & Williams. Philadelphia, Pa.; 
"Loopers," from Hepworth & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and William 
Beattie, Cohoes, X. Y. ; "Cone Winders," from Universal Cone 
Winding Co., Boston, Mass. 

WINDING, SPOOLING, TWISTING, REELING, 
WARPING, ETC. 

For the purpose of proper administration, the various machines 
devoted to the preparation of cotton, wool and worsted yarns for 
the loom are grouped in one large room, so that the very best advan- 
tage in the way of instruction and practical usefulness may be 
obtained. The machines in use in this work are recognized among 
the best to be had. The following makers are represented : 

Bobbin winders for cotton, wool and worsted from the Fair- 
mount Machine Works and W. W. Altemus & Son; drum and 
upright spoolers for cotton, wool and worsted from W. W. Altemus 
& Son, and Easton & Burnham ; ring twisters, for plain and fancy 
twisted yarns, from Collins Bros., the Draper Co., and the Phila- 
delphia Textile Machine Co. ; cop winders for carpet, backing and 
upholstery yarns from A. W. Allen and W. W. Altemus & Son; 
yarn reels, six in number, straight, cross and combination, from the 
Draper Co. and Lindsay, Hyde & Co. Machines devoted to warping 
and beaming include, in addition to the numerous pin warping 
frames and creels, upright and sectional warpers for cotton, worsted 
and woolen yarns, and a T. C. Entwistle chain beamer and six 
specially constructed beaming frames. 

SILK REELING, WINDING AND WARPING 

Particular attention has been given to the equipment of this 
department of reeling, winding and the preparation of silk for 
weaving purpose. The machinery installed includes soft silk skein 
w'inders, doublers and Swiss quill-winding machines, warpers and 
creels, as well as beamers for above warpers. All this machinery is 
from the Atwood-Morrison Co., Stonington, Conn. Additional 
quill-winding machinery is from the Schaum & Uhlinger Co., Phila- 
delphia, Pa., the Universal Winding Co., Boston, ]\Iass., and two 
reels for winding direct from the cocoon. The silk department also 
possesses the entire collection of the Women's Silk Culture Asso- 
ciation of America, which in itself is a most valuable aid to those 
making a study of the silk fibre. 

HAND-WEAVING LABORATORY 

The rooms devoted to hand weaving and related branches are 
three in number. These rooms contain upwards of 90 looms, 
38 



specially (lesi.^iicd and ci nislruclcd, adaptalilc to the wea\ing of all 
classes of textures, (iroups or sections of looms are formed, each 
section heiuLj de\'r)tcd to sumc sjiecial class of got ids, such as cotton 
(ir union fahrics, wool and worsted fabrics for lidth men's wear and 
women's wear. jaccpiard and si^ecial stuffs in cotton, wool and 
worsted, as well as those for plain and fancy silks, furniture cover- 
ings and drajieries. Several looms are devoted to such narrow 
falirics as laces, bindings, ribl.ions, elastic and non-elastic webbings. 




HE.WY \VOR.STEP .SXD WOOLEN LOOM,S. 

POWER-WEAVING LABORATORY 

The fcmr laboratories in which the e(|uipment ior jiower weaving 
is installed are arranged so as t(j admit of satisfactory administration 
in accordance with the organized eoiu'ses of instructi<jn. The com- 
pleteness and variety of this e(|uipment is unexcelled liy that of any 
similar institution, 'I'he machinery is of .\merican make, from the 
best makers, thoroughly up to date and exceptionally well assorted. 
The breadth of the School's field of instruction necessitates this 
extensive collection of machinery, the policy being to teach liy means 
of tliat which is liest adapted to the fabric in question, and wdien a 
loom builder brings out an improvement, tlie new is sul:)stituted for 
the old or new attachments added. 

The looms in most freciuent use by the classes are located in a 
large, welbliuhted room, and the purjjoses for wdiich they are in- 
tended range from the finest gingham to the heaviest worsted and 
woolen of the harness type, including various looms wdth leno 
attachments. The production of fabrics of a more highl\- ornamental 

39 



character, including the finest silk damask, dress goods, draperies 
and heav}' woolen robes, is provided for by a large collection of 
suitable looms equipped with Jacquard machines. Three other 
laboratories, not as large as the one mentioned, are fitted up on the 
same general plan, and contain looms for special purposes, but which 
are not apt to be in as common use. The ingrain carpet industry is 
cared for by three typical looms of different makes, and included in 
the equipment for fine cottons are three filling magazine looms with 
warp stop motions, showing that the school is keeping apace with 
progress in this line. The narrow goods, elastic and non-clastic, are 
amply pro\'ided for. as well as fabrics to which the swivel and 
lappet principles are applied, also terry or Turkish toweling. 

The following well-known makers of looms are characteristic- 
ally represented in the school's power-weaving plant : 

The Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester. Alass., from 
which shops the school has obtained a large proportion of the looms 
for silks, cottons, worsteds, woolens, upholstery, fabrics, carpets, 
towels, lappets, lenos, etc. 

From the Draper Co.. Hopedale, ]\lass., three automatic looms 
for plain and fancy cottons. 

From Schaum & Uhlinger. Philadelphia, Pa., looms for silks, 
swivel dress goods, draperies, ribbons, narrow webbings, etc. 

The looms from the following makers are intended for fine 
cotton fabrics: The Whitin ^lachinc Works. Whitinsville. ]\Iass. ; 
the George W. Stafford Co.. Readville. Mass. 

JACQUARD CARD CUTTING AND 
LACING LABORATORY 

The large number of Jacquard machines possessed by the school 
(26 in number, ranging from 200 to L200-hook capacity) has neces- 
sitated a proportionately large number of card-cutting machines to 
facilitate the w^ork of Jacquard design. Aery few factories possess 
the facilities for card stamping as are found in this department. 

The room in wdiich these machines are contained is exceptionally 
well lighted, having both top and side lights, and is equally well pro- 
vided in other essential features. The equipment consists of the 
following machines : 

One American and one French index, foot power card stampers, 
from Schaum & Uhlinger. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Four latest improved French index, foot power, card stampers, 
from John Royle & Sons, Paterson, N. J. 

Two latest improved mechanically driven I'Vench index card 
stampers, from John Koj'le & Sons, Paterson. X. J. 

Two latest improved (1915) electrically driven French index 
card stampers, from John Royle & Sons, Paterson, X. J. 
40 



Tlie .American index machine is inlemleil for ingrain carpet 
work alone. I'^.ach ol the others is adjustalile to 200, 400 and 600 
cards, and is also (.'(iniitiied witli the latest improvements in the way 
(if racks, escapements, reading; lioards and other features indispens- 
able to the pi'odnction of <j,ood work. 

The department also possesses several sets of punching plates 
for side jac(|uar(ls, a power card-lacing machine for 200, 400, fiOO 
and ingrain cards, as well as several hand card-lacing frames. Also 
hraiding machines from Xew luigiand l'>utt Co., for the manufac- 
ture of lacing cord used. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORIES 

The three rooms devoted to jiractical work in pure and applied 
cliemistr\- are admiralily e(pii[iped with all necessary glass, porcelain 
and idatinum ware, etc. 

Besides his individual outht, the student has the use of such 
forms of special api>aratus as his work may recjuire. 

DYEING LABORATORY 

A large numlier of hench lockers provided with necessary appa- 
ratus for experimental d\eing and dyestuff testing. 

A number of co])per and woolen dye vats for dyeing yarn and 
piece goods in lots of 1 ' _■ pounds up to 50 pounds. 

Scouring tul:)S, soap l)oiler, scouring and dyeing luiwls for loose 
stock. 

Klauder & Weldon scouring and dyeing machine for j-arns of 
all characters; also Klauder & Weldon machine for dyeing of loose 
stock; (Iranger jig-dyeing machine; L'.utterworth warp-dyeing ma- 
chine; Psarski model d\-eing machine with pump complete; Hussong 
dyeing machine for lots up to 50 pounds; Schaum & Uhlinger 
hydro-extractor; one Mulhausen laboratory ])umiMng machine, and 
one Alather & I'latt lalioratory i)rinting machine; steaming cottage; 
hot-air dryer. y\ll the water used in the dye house is clarified by 
the aid of a large filter, installed by the Philadelphia Water Puri- 
fication Company. 

One Allen circulating Kier for boiling out. under pressure, cot- 
ton and other vegetable fibres in the form of yarn or piece goods. 

An experimental slate bleaching tank from Penrhyn Slate Co., 
and an apparatus for bleaching with sodium peroxide from Roessler, 
Hasslacher Co., are used to show latest developments in bleaching, 

MICROSCOPIC FIBRE-TESTING AND COLORIMETRIC 
LABORATORY 

This is well eipiipped with a numlier of micr(.jscopes and ai)i)a- 
ratus for the preparation of slides and sections; photographic 
apparatus for the making (jf photomicrographs; Lovibund tinto- 

41 



meter, with set of standard glasses and large number of gelatine 
films of various dyestufts ; a Zeiss comparison spectroscope and a 
Zeiss universal spectroscope, with all accessories for the spectro- 
scopic study of dyestuffs; a Reeser & Mackenzie fibre-testing ma- 
chine, for determining tensile strength and elasticity. 

The laboratory is also supplied with a conditioning oven of the 
latest pattern, capable of rapidly and accurately giving the amount 
of hygroscopic moisture contained in anj' class of fibre in any form, 




MICROSCOPIC AND COLORIMETRIC LABORATORY. 

raw or manufactured. Tests on small or large samples can be made 
with equal facility. 

CLOTH FINISHING LABORATORY 

The facilities for finishing of the various fabrics produced in the 
school are quite in keeping with those of other departments, and 
consist of one three-quarter combination washing and rotary fulling 
mill, and one small fulling mill for samples ; both from the James 
Hunter ^Machine Co., Xorth Adams, Mass.; a Gessner improved 
push mill, with lateral side movement; single-cylinder upright gig, 
Curtis & Alarble make ; Parks & Woolson cloth shear, with patent 
listing motion; Parks & Woolson double-cylinder cloth brush, with 
steamer attachment ; Gessner improved cloth press ; Alorris & 
Tasker hydro-extractor, tenter bars, frames, etc. 
42 



Courses of Study— Day School 

The school offers to prospective clay students the fol- 
lowing- carefully [)repare(l courses of instruction, each of 
which has heen organized with a distinct purpose. The 
broad subject of textile manufacture receives a most com- 
prehensive treatment in what is termed the : — - 




IF nil:: LliCTL'KE Ri 



This is a wcll-lightc-d r(JOiu and is especially intended fur work in analysis of 
falndc, weave formation, color harmony and similar studies. 



REGULAR TEXTILE COURSE (Diploma) 

This course, which is the development of twcnty-iour 
years of active, thoughtful work in textile education, is 
strongly recommended to all, particularly on account of its 
scope ; tending, as it does, to overcome for the individual the 
narrowness of knowledge which is apt to result from divi- 
sion of labor and specialization in industry. The keen com- 
petition of the present day has placed a premium on the man 
whose knowledge is broad, and it is in realization of this 
fact that the Regular Course has been arranged to give full 
instruction in cotton, wool, worsted and silk yarns and 

43 



REGULAR COURSE^FIRST YEAR 



fabrics. The person following this course is enabled, on its 
completion, to enter any of the mentioned branches of the 
industry, and by his knowledge of the others recognize good 
features in them and adapt these good features to his own 
fabrics. Three years are required to complete this course, 
which includes the following : — 

Subjects of Study — First Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

This subject treats of the construction of the various classes of 
weaves which govern the manner in which threads are interlaced 
to form woven fabrics. In this, the first j'ear, the subject is con- 
sidered in its relation to fundamental and derivative weaves for 
fabrics, composed of one warp and one filling, up to and including 
fabrics composed of two warps and one filling, and inasmuch as 
their use is confined to no one material, their study is common to the 
silk, cotton, wool and worsted courses. The weaves are studied in 
their relation to one another, together with their peculiarities of 
texture, take-up, effect, feel and color possibilities. At the close of 
the year the student possesses an extensive record of his work, which 
is continued in the succeeding years of the course. The following 
gives a general idea of the scope of this year's instruction : 

General principles of the structure weaves. — Explanation of "^^'arp" and 
"Filling." — Methods of representing weaves on squared paper. — Classification 
of weaves. — Foundation and derivative weaves. — Plain weave and the methods 
of ornamenting it. — Methods for constructing the various twill and satin weaves. 
— Influence of the twist of yarn on the effect of the weave. — Explanation of 
drafting. — Rules for preparing drawing-in drafts and chain drafts from weaves. 
— Reducing weaves to their lowest number of harnesses. — \'arious weaves de- 
rived from the "Foundation Weaves." — Alethods for their construction. — The 
various fabrics to which they are adapted. — Circumstances which make it 
more advantageous to vise one class of weaves than another. — Weaves which 
are suitable for particular classes of fabrics in contrast with weaves for other 
classes. — Weave combination. — Consideration of "Texture" and "Take-up" in 
placing weaves together. — Combining weaves to form stripes and checks. — Effect 
of color on the weave. — One-and-one and two-and-two systems. — Two-and-two 
and four-and-four applied to fancy weaves. — An extra filling added to weaves. — 
Figured effects produced by floating the extra filling on the face. — Figures pro- 
duced by so stitching the extra filling as to produce light and dim effects. — 
.Single-faced and double-faced fabrics produced by using an extra filling. — 
Extra filling for adding weight to a fabric. — The addition of an extra warp. — 
Single and double-faced fabrics produced by using an extra warp. — The use 
of an extra warp for figuring on the face. — Increasing the weight by the use 
of an extra warp. Proper methods for stitching the back to the face. — Effect 
of improper stitching. — Imperfect cloth resulting from the same. 

44 



REGULAR COURSE— FIRST YEAR 



ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

Cotton, wool, worsted, silk and other varieties of yarns and 
fabrics ari' caret'ully investigated and discussed with a view to the 
formation of desirt'd I'alirics. A brief outline of the plan of work 
is here ai^pentled. 

Yarn Calculations — Grading yarns with regard to size, — Con- 
sideration of the various systems in their relation to one another in 
one or more pl\' threads. The relation of cijunt, weight and length 
of different threads. 

Fabric Analysis. — Ascertaining the weave, drawing-in draft, 
chain draft, ends and picks per inch, arrangement of warp and tilling 




F..\r.RIC EXAMINING AND TESTING LABORATORY 



colors, counts of warp and idling, take-ui) in weaving. — Amount of 
each color and material reciuired in a given length of goods. 

I'ai'.ric Strciti;ke — Is studied in part by observation and de- 
ductions based on the results obtained in the thorou,L;h analysis of 
fabrics wdiich may lie remarkable for their good or bad qualities. 
This subject also includes the organization of specifications, designs 
and cobirings for jirescribed fabrics, the majority of which are 
executed by the student, thus enabling him to see the actual result 
of his thought. 

45 




c ^ 
to 



REGULAR COURSE— FIRST YEAR 



FREE-HAND DRAWING 

Lookin.ii at a thing docs not necessarily indicate seeing a tiling. 
Free-hand drawing taxes the former to insure the latter. So much 
from a ]>ractical standpoint. I'\u"tliermnre, free-hand drawing culti- 
vates a better taste, which is an essential in all embellishments, and 
thus becomes a necessity for the api)reciation and acquirement of 
the subsequent studies of figured design, color harmony, etc. 

FIGURED DESIGN 

Designing does not simply indicate an, indiscriminate decoration, 
but the exercise of care in the appropriateness of embellishments, 
wdiether such be used for the highest flowery design of a carpet or 
the simple lines of tr(juserings or shirtings. In textiles this l)ecomes 
more apparent when we consider not only the decorations and uses, 
but likewise the markets for which they are intended ; lience special 
attention is paid t(.i original drawings of natural forms, tlieir conven- 
tionalization, history of ornament, and theory (jf color. 

COLOR HARMONY 

This subject is one of vital importance to all concerned in the 
manufacture and marketing of textiles, for, in spite of good design 
and good fabric, if the coloring is not pleasing the faliric will not 
sell. A thorough study of this subject, relating entirely to textiles, 
is a prominent feature of the school's work. While the principles 
of color are the same, whatever their application, the course of study 
is so arranged as to bear entirely on yarns and fabrics. Starting 
out with the raw pigment, and working on paper and in the actual 
goods, the eye of the student undergoes a gradual and almost 
unconscious training in the application of what is good and what 
is bad in color coml)ination. He liecomes able to decide not only 
what colors or shades may be tastefully combined, but also on the 
relative depths of tone wdiich will be allowable under given condi- ' 
tions and in given combinations. His knowledge of tlie structure 
of fabrics and of design enables him to estimate correctly the 
quantity and quality of the color which will be visible on the face 
of the goods, and to make correct allowances in his original color 
scheme for the modifications of effect which these conditions imply.' 

WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 

This subject is taught as a means of demonstrating and develop-^' 
ing the instruction given in weave formation and fabric structure, 
and, while keeping this idea in view, due attention is also paid to the 
giving of a thorough grounding in the underlying principles of weav- 
ing and weaving mechanism. Experience has proven that these ends 
are most rapidly attained by means of the hanrl loom, and for this 

47 



REGULAR COURSE— FIRSf YEAR 



reason each ^^tudeiit lias the use of sueh a loom of especial con- 
struction, wuli a cajiacity of M) harness. 4x4 hoxes. By means of 
tins loom h<.- produces fal)rics. studies the r(,'lation of weave, yarn, 
texture, takt^'-up and co\er, to,s,;ether with tlu' ])ro])fr conditions of 
warp line, tension, hei.nht n\ shed, throw of shuttle, heat of lay, etc., 
all of which are under Ids personal control. In addition to this, all 
students will he re(|uired to dexote a certain amount of time to 
powxr loom jiractice, t-ontin,i.ient, hovvexer, on iiroyress in the fore- 
,i;oin,!.;'. In .general, the v\'ork is as lollows: 

j\iial\'sis and cxplaiiatKni <if the hand Innm. — N'arious inctlrnds of forming 
the "shed." — Lanilis, treailks and countermarch. — Dolibies and witches. — Cal- 
culations as to te.xtme and ends in warji. width in reed. etc. — .Arranging the 
threads to form the war]i.— Beannng, entering.— -1 lr;i\vinK-in, twisting-in and 
reeiling. — .Adjusting the war]i in the loom. — Pattern ch.ain l]niMing. — Weaving 
on tile liand hM.m of a iirescril>ecl nnml)er of fal>rics of cotton, wool, worsteit, 
and silk. 

JACQUARD DESIGN 

ddie aim ot this studx' is to adopt the principles tau.uht under 
the suhject oi weave formation to the capahilities of the Jacquard 
machine. 

4'iiK .M .\( iiixi-:. — The .general explanation of the simpler forms 
of tin- machine is fcdlowed hy the luakino of drawings of the internal 
worknfL; parts, show in,L; their relation and connection. Comparisons 
are chdy made hetw'een the harness sheddin.o motion and the 
jac(|uard. 

iMouNTiNG. — The Im-cucIi ami Imi.oHsIi systems of momiting or 
tying-uii are thoroughly explained. I'omhinations of the various 
orders of tlu'se systeius are made in actual ])ractice, as well as 
calculations for the laying out of textures in the comberboard. 

1 )KSir,NiN(;. — Tile makin.g of sketches for \'arious textures and 
tie-ups. — The use of squared design paper. — Princii)les of enlarging 
sketches. 

Card St.amping. — The princi]iles of card stanqiing and lacing.^ 
Fingeriu" for French, .Xmerican and line index stamping machines. 
— Card- stamping directions. 

CHEMISTRY 

I'or outline of work in this suhject, see Chemistry I, page 83. 

TEXTILE FIBRES 

h^or outline of work in this subject, see Dyeing T, page >^7. 

COTTON YARN MANUFACTURE 

The chief advantage of scho(.)l training in this subject does not 
lie in the actual operation of machines, but rather in the knowded.ge 
of how to adjust the parts of the machines to suit \ar_\ing" conditions 

49 



REGULAR COURSE— SECOND YEAR 



necessitated by different lengths of fibre and counts of yarn, in order 
that the machines may be run to the best advantage. The use and 
structure of each portion of the machines is studied in its relation to 
the other parts with reference to its effect on the product. Starting 
with the desire to produce a certain yarn, all the necessary calcula- 
tions of speed and delivery are made, so that the proper amount of 
work may be done at each operation and the fibre handled with the 
least amount of injury and waste. The knowledge of how to blend 
fibres and produce yarns makes the person who is also familiar with 
designing and weaving exceptionally valuable, either as designer, as 
overseer of weaving or of carding and spinning, or in those positions 
in which men are expected to superintend all three of these opera- 
tions. The following is an outline of the scope of the subject: 

A'arieties of Cotton. — Their characteristics and uses. — The adaptation of 
various cottons to different classes of work. 

Preparatory Processes. — Bale breakers. — Mixing lattices. — Openers. — In- 
termediate and finisher pickers. 

Carding. — The theory of carding carefvilly studied. — Brief outline of the 
various methods of carding, with a thorough study of the construction and 
working of revolving flat cards. — The necessary settings and adjustments, 
together with calculations for all changes in the speeds of the different parts. 

Card Clothing. — The essentials of good carding. — The principles of grind- 
ing and the practical accomplishments thereof. 

Combing. — The process briefly outlined, showing its use and place in the 
order of operations. Considered fully in the second year. 

Railway Head. — Its functions and advantages. — Calculations for necessary 
changes. 

Drawing. — The object of drawing. — Functions of the drawing frame. — 
Different types of frames in use. — Rules for all changes. 

Fly Frames. — Slubbers. — Intermediates. — Fine roving frames. — Their func- 
tions, similarities and differences. — The theory of winding. — Differential motions 
of Holdsworth, Tweedale, Daly, and others. — Rules and calculations for changes. 

Spinning. — The theory of spinning. — The mule and ring frame. — Spindles, 
travelers, rings, builder motions. — Calculations for draft and twist, and pro- 
duction. 

Note. — The course is conducted by means of lectures, recitations, quizzes, 
essays, abstracts and practical work upon the machines. Winchester's "Theory 
and Practice of Cotton Yarn Manufacturing" is used as a text-book. 



Subjects of Study — Second Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

The instruction in this subject given in the second year may be 
said to embrace an application to heavier and more complicated 
fabrics of the weaves studied in the first year. The work in general 
50 



REGULAR COnRSE— SECOND YEAR 



is conhned to double weavinR—tliat is, weaves for fabrics com- 
posed of two systems of warp and of Unins—and its treatment is 
general in its application, includin.u fabrics of silk, cotton, wool and 
worsted. The following is a brief statement of the matter covered: 
\'alue of a knowledge of double clr.th weaves.— Methods of constructing 
double cloth weaves, and of indicating them on designing paper.— Consideration 
of the various proportions of face and back, such as one face an,l one back, two 
face and one back; three face and one back.— Also those on which the warp 
and filling have not the same arrangement, such as one face and one back in 
warp, and two face one back in filling; two face one back in warp, and one face 
one back in Idling and other irregular arrangements.— Rules for stitching double 
cloth weaves.-Invisible stitching.-The production of figures by means of the 
three-color striped weaves.— 1 )oulde j.lain weaves for reversible ligured efl^ects — 
Weaves for such special fabrics as Bedford cords, dotted Swisses, plaid lawns 
pique, figured pique, Marseilles, coatings, matellasses, face-finished fabrics 
beavers, kerseys, meltons, tricots, chinchillas, etc.— Longitudinal and diagonal- 
rib. 

ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

Cotton, wool, worsted, .^Ik and other varieties of varns and 
fabrics are considered on somewhat the same plan as in the hrst 
year, but by means of more advanced problems. 

A'.VKX C.VLcuLATioNs embrace a study of the shrinkages which 
are encountered in the various operations of weaving and hnishing, 
m their effect on the resultmg f;ibrics.-The selection u{ ],rni,"i' 
yarns for rcfpn'red weights of goorl. and f,,r given textures. 

I'ABRK- Ax.M.vsis is followed largely in <l,,ul.le cloths, and, in 
addition to the points looked for in the lirst-year analysis, the 
student is brcught in contact with, the (piesti,)!, ,,f tw.i ..r more warps 
and fillings in the one piece, lie thus includes in his research the 
question of different shrinkage and losses, and in his estimate the 
quantity of materials necessary for a given Inn.shed piece of goods. 

Fabric STRrcTURi-;.- In planning and calculating on the neces- 
sary specifications for the correct structure of fabrics, in this the 
second year of the course, the student not only steps from single to 
double cloths, with the consequent augmentation of details, but he 
IS also brought to a consideration of the subject of texture. He is 
required to decide upon the jiroper number of warp and lilling 
threads for the weave to be used, and to make all necessary allow'^ 
ances for ease in weaving and for shrinkages after being woven. 
Hence, a careful study of the question of volume or size of threads 
is essential, particularly in relation to the interlacings of the diff'erent 
weaves. The actual pr.Hhiction of the fabric in all its details by the 
effort of the student lends much to the value of the theoretical 
knowledge gained. 

51 



REGULAR COURSE— SECOND YEAR 



JACQUARD DESIGN AND COLOR 

The purpose of the consideration of this subject, in addition to 
adapting the principles of weave formation to the machine, is to 
expand into broader and more varied effects the work of the first 
year. Color, being such an adjunct in the making of figured effects, 
is here applied to assist in bringing out the designs. 

The AIachixe. — The use of various machines, to attain speed 
and easier action on the warp, are explained, and drawings of the 
construction of their internal parts made. Such machines are treated 
as follows : 

Rise and fall. — Double lift, double and single cylinder. — Auxiliary cylinder 
and twilling machines. — Substitution of trap-boards and tail-cords for hooks 
and griffe bars. — Substitution of journals for comberboard. 

Mounting. — The various tie-ups for the working of two warps 
and extra figure warps are explained, comberboards threaded and 
calculations made for all necessary particulars for the placing of 
such forms in the loom as — • 

Section ties. — Repeated effects in one repeat. — Combinations of straight 
and point ties for table covers and curtains, etc. — Placing of extra sections in 
front for striped effects. 

Designing. — Cloth-size sketches, in the colors to be used in the 
woven fabric, are made, and enlarged upon squared design paper, 
in order that the various ap])lications of weave to produce effects 
can be studied in a practical form. Designs are worked out in this 
manner for different textures and tie-ups for — 

Cotton and silk derbies. — Reversible draperies. — Blankets. — Figured dress 
goods. — Fine, super-fine and extra super-ingrain carpets, and various double 
cloths. 

Card Cutting. — Card stamping is done from designs made by 
the students for the various fabrics, in accordance with principles 
laid down in the hrst j'ear's work. Students are required to cut and 
lace cards from their own designs, using both French and American 
index cutters. 

WOOL AND WORSTED YARN MANUFACTURE 

In this year, the second of the course, the student studies the 
subject of "wool" and its inanipulation into yarns, largelj- on the 
same general lines as that laid down for cotton yarn manufacture, 
outlined in the first year of the course. Particular attention is paid 
to the study of what is commercially called the "raw material" (the 
wool fibre and the by-products of wool) and the mechanical func- 
tions of the various machines used in processing the material prior 
to spinning. The following is an outline of the scope of the subject: 
52 



REGULAR COURSE— SECOND YEAR 



RAW MATERIALS OF THE WOOL INDUSTRIES 

The wool fihre.-Structure.-Prop.rfes and characteristics.-Classes of 
fleece wool.-Menno types.- Territory wooIs.-Wools from British breeds - 
l-ongwo..l and medium wool.— Crossbreds.— Carpet wools.— Necessity for grad- 
ing and sorting.— Various qualities in fleeces.— Skirting.— Mill methods of 
designating sorts.-Co,n,,arative wool grades.-Sorting tests.-Grades of wool 
troni various breeds of sheep.-Cause of shrinkage.-Shrinkage of various 
wools,— Shearing.— Preparing.— Marketing.— Pulled wo„ls.— S,,uree of supply — 
Methods of pulling.— Uses.— Distinction between hair and wn.,1.— Mohair '- 
Alpaca.— \ leuna.— IJama.- Cashmere.— Camel hair.— Horse hair — W,,ol sub 
st.tutes and waste products.— Importance and necessity.- Essential requirements 
in raw materials tnr manufacturing.-Text Rook: "The Raw Materials Used in 
the Wonl Industries," by S. II. Hart, will be used. 

A-ofr.- Wool scouring and drying considered under Chemistry and Dyeing. 

WOOLEN YARNS 

Preparatory PRocss^s.-Hurring and picking.-Consideration of the 
various burring and picking machines in general use.-Preparation of mixes 
and methods adopte.l m laying down mixes acconling to desired percentages- 
Oilmg tlie mix.— Testing and selection of oils. 




A.XD SI'IXNINC 



Carding.— Theory cf carding.— Explanation of the term "set .,f cards "— 
Names and uses of the various rolls and cylinders.-Truing up of cylinders - 
The necessary settings and adjustments, together with calculations for changes 
in the speeds of the different parts. 

Card Clothixg.— The essentials of good clothing.-Construction, classifica- 
tion, and uses.-Methods of clothing the various rolls and cylinders -The 
principles of grinding and the practical accomplishments thereof.— Erame 
traverse and roll grinders, ' 

Feeds,- Han.l, ball, creel, and automatic feeds carefully considered — 
The construction and adjustments necessary for the satisfactory oj.eration of 
the Rramwell, Apperly, Scotch, Tindel, Fischer, etc. 

Condensers.— The various forms of condensers in general use —Ring sys- 
tem.— Single and double doffers.— Rolette single doffer. —Steel blade dividers — 
German single doffer strap dividers. 

53 



REGULAR COURSE— SECOND YEAR 



Rubbing Motions. — Rolls. — Aprons. — Aprons and rolls combined. — Single, 
double and quadruple bank apron rubbers thoroughly studied, together with the 
methods and appliances used in the making of the various woolen novelty yarns. 

In addition to the above a limited amount of machine sketching 
and drawing is required, so that bj- thus supplementing the lectures 
and practical work in carding and spinning of wool, and the draw- 
ing and spinning of worsted, the student is enabled to obtain an 
acquaintanceship with the various machines, which should be most 

i^'^'^^Sh. WORSTED YARNS 

Preparing. — Explanation of the process. — Gill box and Faller motion. — 
What wools are prepared and why they are not carded. — Preparing medium 
staple woiils before carding. 




Mtiiox OF Wool mi.xixg room, showing the schofield willow. 

Carding. — Comparison of the card used for worsted with that commonly 
used for wool. 

Combing. — Original method of combing. — Hand combing. — Combing by 
machines. — The Noble, Lister. Holden and Little & Eastwood machines duly 
considered. 

Balling or Top Making. — Explanation of the workings of the necessary 
machines used in forming the top. — The Can Finisher and Balling Finisher. — 
The conditioning of tops. 

Drawing. — The principles of drawing duly explained. 

Calculations. — All the necessary calculations required in the above proc- 
esses. 

Note. — The work in this subject from the ileece to the top is largely ele- 
mentarv; studied more exhaustively in following year. 

54 



REGULAR COURSE^SECONI) YEAR 



WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 

The instructicin in (liis sulijcct in (he second year is given with 
reterence to power looms of the latest types. The student now 
studies tile mechanical means which are in vogue for the attaiiuuent 
of the operations of weaxing, and which were performed hy hand in 
the preceding year. Careful attention is given to the timing, setting 
and general adjusting of the \'arious parts of the ])Ower looms. The 
stiulent is recjuired to kee]) careful rec<irils of all such instruction, 
and to ])roduce a prescrihe(l nuruher and \ariet\' id' fabrics, of com- 
mercial proportions, from his own specifications. 

Tlu- stiuly ni the |niutr lonm. — Tlie iirinci]iles governing its parts. — The 
various sludilinK iiucliauisni, cam motion, cam and scroll motion, dobby motion. 
— < 'lien and closed shed looms and the ailvantages of each. — The varions pick- 
ing motions, the alternating pick, the pick and pick, cam and cone, sliding pick 
miition. — Rules and calculations for change gears for the various take-up 
motions. — Ascertaining desired speed of shafting and size of pulley for given 
speed of loom. — Shuttle lio.x motions, raise and drop liox, skip box, circular 
box, biixes controlled by cams, iiy a chain and by the Jacquard. — Timing and 
setting of the box motions of the Enowles, C'rompton, Wood, bvu-bush, Scliaum 
& Uhlinger, .Stafford and \\'lntin Impiiis.- -Knock-off motions. — Fast and loose 
reeds. — Harness and liox chjjn building ;ind cue of stock. — Multiplier box 
chain liuilding. — Production of f;iliries for men's ;inil women's wear, draperies, 
carpets, etc., from cotton, wool, worsteil, silk and linen, on the latest and best 
looms made. 

Note. — The fabrics produced by each student are from his (jwn designs 
and from yarn dyed by the stuileiits. lie iierfoiins all the operations of 
warping, beaming, drawing-in, reeding, idaeing in the loom, chain building 
and weaving, and assists in the (inishing of the fafirics. 

CHEMISTRY 

The chemistry takeif up in this _\ear is inchuK'd under the gen- 
eral title of qualitatixe analysis, wherein the analytical classification 
and tests for the various metals and non-metals is studied. The 
work in tlds hranch, however, is hrought right down to a practical 
hasis hy employing as olijects of the tests the fhfferent chemicals 
actually employed in mill work. These include the various acids, 
alkalies and salts normall\- occurring in trade. In this manner it is 
endeavored not oidy to give the student a drill in the theory of 
qualitative anal}'sis, hut also to provide liim with a concrete basis for 
his knowledge, so that the ends of both scientific instruction as w^ell 
as ])ractical information and exi)erience are attained. A good drill 
in the solving of reactions and the calculation of results is also given, 
together with considerable laboratory practice in experimental 
manipulation and the handling and use of analytical apparatus. The 
whole object of the course is to give the student an intelligent idea 
of the manner of procediu'e to be followed in the ])ractical testing 
and detection of impurities in the xarious chemicals likely to he 
employed in the textile industries. 

55 



REGULAR COURSE— SECOND YEAR 



DYEING 

D\-eing is also taken up during this year. The course is elemen- 
tary in character, and is so designed as to embrace the general 
methods of scouring, bleaching and dyeing both wool and cotton. 
Its purpose is to give the general textile student an intelligent 
idea of how these processes are conducted, and the principles on 
which they are based. The chemical and physical properties of the 
fibres are studied with a view to their behavior under the different 
processes of manufacture. The application of the different classes 
of dyes is taken up, with methods of testing their fastness and 
suitability for special purposes. The student also has the oppor- 
tunit}' of doing practical work in the dye house under careful super- 
vision, and to become acquainted with the modern methods and 
machinerv of dveing. 




DRV HXISIIIXG. 

In this room the second and third year students aid in tinishing the various 
falirics produced. 

FINISHING 

This highly important step in the production of a marketable 
textile fabric constitutes a subject which is remarkable for its 
complexity. The immense variety of goods whose points of dif- 
ference are dependent wholly upon the character of the finish which 
has been put upon them calls for the use of numerous finishing 
materials, and the application of these in their turn necessitates many 
different machines. The subject is treated in its broader sense by 
means of lectures throughout the season. The general underlying 
principles of the art are, however, exemplified by the actual finish- 
ing of many of the fabrics produced in the school, and the students 
56 



REGULAR COURSE— THIRTI YEAR 



lia\c the i)|i|i(iiiunity of assisting" in the incidental oiierations, as 
well as in tlu' niixin.L; ot" the ni^cessary in,L;re(hents. 'ilie following 
gi\'es a general outhni- (if the scijpe of the lectures: 

WORSTED AND WOOLENS 

Process of linishinn dcliiieil. -The iire\iaratory processes of finishing, such 
as hurling, nieiiiling, ins|iecting .iml niunlieiing. 

SciinRiNG. — Sciiuring, and tlie various soaps anil alkalies generally used. — 
Action and strength of soajis for the dilfcrent kinils of cloth. — Mow the soap 
and alkalies shouhl l.e applied. 

I-'ULMNG. — The fulling process. — Why fulling is resorted to. — The prop- 
erties of a good fulling soap. — 't'he various inlluences which most affect the 
fulling of falirics. such as the "character" of the "libre." — The '"twist" of the 
"yarns." — The "nature" ai the "weave." — The "weight" of the "goods," light 
or heavy. 

Gigging. — Exjdanation of the term gigging. — The various machines and 
methods considered. — I Iry and wet gigging defined. 

Sti AMJNij. — Steaming ami cralibing and necessity for such treatment. — 
Lustre cloths. 

,Sn I'Aiii NG. — Shearing; its purpose. — The elTects of previous treatment as to 
good shearing. — The proiHr adjustment of machine to shear the various kinds 
of cloths. — Grinding. 

I'm ssi .VG.- I'rcssing ; rotary and plate pressers considered. — Proper heat 
and pressure.— -Style of Iniish considered. 



Regular Course— Third Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

In this, the final year of stuilx'. the one which rejiresents the 
last o])])ortunity the student will have for school work, particular 
attention is jiaid not only to wea\'es of a higher order, of more 
intricate interlacing, hut to a more technical consideration, 1 rom a 
commercial standpoint, of wea\'es for tlie e\ery-(lay lalirics. The 
solution of the many difficult prohlems in inter-wea\ing hrought 
forward in this year tlirows a new, a clearer light on the preceding 
year's weaves, giving the student a far hetter grasp of the entire 
subject. In other words, he is enahled to investigate prolilems in a 
thorough manner and with the satisfaction which comes ol knowing 
how. Three and more ply weaves are ])lanned uiion paper, hoth for 
plain and figured effects, in such falirics as overcoatings, cloakings, 
hea\'y drajjcries, brocades, etc. 

Study is directecl in the line of such woolen and worsted fabrics as crepons, 
mantle cloths, habit cloths, Imckskins, doeskins, carriage cloths, box coatings, 
casket cloth, friezes, whiiicords, coverts, etc., and in all the weaves considered 
due emphasis is laid upon the effects which they produce when treated with 
various systems of coloring. Careful and extensive attention is given to leno 

57 



REGULAR COURSE— THIRD YEAR 



or doupe weaves, single and double doupe, combination of doupe and other 
orders of weaving and the production of figured effects by means of one doupe. 
Lappet and swivel effects are considered. Weaves are studied which are best 
suited to such narrow fabrics as suspender and garter webs, goring, name webs, 
shoe pulls, etc. Filling and warp pile weaves are taken for velvet, corduroys, 
plushes, imitation furs, astrakhans, chinchillas, lamb skins, etc. Considerable 
attention is also given to the study of new methods for the derivation of 
original ground weaves of a granite and crepe order, such as are always in 
demand for suitings, dress goods, etc. 

ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

The fabrics considered are in keeping with the instruction in 
weave formation, and are not only looked at from the standpoint of 
their intricacy, but they, as well as simple fabrics, are studied with 
more of a view to the commercial end than in either of the preceding 
years. A considerable portion of the work in this branch of study 
consists of planning the specifications for various classes of fabrics 
from original designs, and in many cases from yarns which the 
student has produced from the raw stock. These fabrics are subse- 
c|uently produced by the student, he having the opportunity of per- 
forming every detail, and is ever reminded of the necessity of 
producing a good and pleasing fabric as economically as possible. 

COST FINDING, ETC. 

A'arious systems of cost finding, mill book-keeping, etc., are ex- 
])lained, as well as the questions of commissions, datings, discounts, 
etc. Thus the student is taught to keep the thought of relative cost 
well in mind. 

JACQUARD DESIGN AND COLOR 

In this subject the means is offered the student to carry to an 
advanced state the work of the previous years, and adapting the 
Jacquard to all kinds of fancy comjjlicated fabrics, especially in the 
direction of placing ilgures in three-ply or more complex fabrics. 

The Machine. — The various kinds of Jacquard used in making 
special fabrics of complex nature are explained and drawings made, 
showing the variation from the standard machine. 

Application of gauze machines carrying doupcs and slackeiiers. — Brussels 
carpet machines. — \\'ilton carpet machine. 

Mounting. — The student is here made familiar with the actual 
practice of mounting machines and tj-ing up of the loom for all 
kind of fanc}' and complex effects. The combination of the Jac- 
quard and the dobby for producing large repeats in the cloth are 
explained, and drawings made of the various arrangements of the 
principal parts. Mountings are prepared for — 

Gauze and leno effects. — Scale tie-ups. — Shaft lashing. — Placing of shafts 
in neck cords. — Placing of shafts below comberboard. — Compound harness. — 

58 



REGULAR COURSE— TJ II RD YEAR 



AttaclmiK ,,f liarness f..r uvnind etTects. etc.— Brussels mountings.— Moqurtte 
cai'iiet niouutiii^'s. — Pilr caiiM-t ni.iuntiu'^s. 

Designing.— TIk' influence oi color on the appearance of a 
design is fully recognized, and especial attention is given to the mak- 
ing of sketches in color f,ir carpets and upholstery fahrics. Original 
designs are planned and enlarged to \V(.irkahle designs for— 

Silk brocades of tw.. ninre filliiiK. and warps.— TraveliiiK robes.— Bath 
robes.— Tapestries.— Petit pmiit.— U.uch covers.— Shoe pulls.— Coat labels.— 
Xecktie fabrics.— Prussels, Wilton, nioijuette and tapestry carpets. 

Card Cutting.— h'ollowing the practice in card cutting olitained 
ni the previous year's work, card-cutting directions are made for all 
kmds of effects, and cards are cut for original design made during 
the year. Methods of repeating cards liy mechanical means and the 
workings of new automatic card-cutting appliances are explained, 
and sketches made of their working parts. 

YARN MANUFACTURE 

In this suhject the student may elect to take advanced study in 
either the manufacture of wool and worsted yarns, as outlined on 
page 69, or cotton yarn, as outlined on page 66. 

WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 

This branch of the course is the one in which the student pro- 
duces residts which demonstrate his grasp of the instruction given 
in practically all of the other branches. The fabrics produced are 
irom his own ideas, and, with soiue excejitions, are made from 
}-anis which he has spun and dyed after having selected and ])re- 
pared the raw stock. These fabrics are of a higher class than those 
brought out in the preceding years, and allow him to show his knowl- 
edge of structure, design and coloring. In addition to producing 
certain prescrilied fabrics, the student is expected to execute others 
which he may plan, bearing in mind delinite restrictions as to char- 
acter and capacity of loom and limitations as to the price of the 
fabrics, etc.. thus giving due consideration to the commercial end. 
The following is a brief outline of the matter included in the general 
instruction : 

The lining-iip of looms. — Starting up looms on new lines of goods. — Adjust- 
ing looms to suit the peculiar requirements of various lines of fabrics. — Adapt- 
ing different kinds of hionis to the same character of work.— Devices for stop- 
ping and starting take-up m.itions to suit special fabrics.— The production of 
single and double doupe effects in fabrics.— Single, double and more intricate 
classes of goods. — All the operations are performed by the student with only 
such assistance as may be called for in promoting the aims of judicious 
instruction. 

59 



REGUI-AR COURSE— THIRD YEAR 



CHEMISTRY 

The chemistry stnched chirin,^ tlie liiial \ear d" the e.iurse is a 
lii,<^ical continuation ol the analytical work pursued during the ])re- 
cedui.u" year, only it is c|uantitati\e in character instead of (jualitative. 
1 he student receives careful instruction in the use of line halauces 
and in the ,<;-enera] methods em])lo\e(l in l.oth .uraviiuetric and volu- 
metric analysis, d'lu- ohjects ui)on which the student works in the 
])rosecution n\ his experiments are also conlined to those which are 
actually emploeed in the mill. In this manner the suhject is made 




A COKNKI; 1\ THE ri)\\].|; W Il.W E ROOM. 

concrete, and has an actual jiractical \alue to the student rather than 
a merely theoretical \alue serxin.t; for i)urposes of instruction onl_\-. 
Considerahle drill and |)ractice are also ,ui\en in the methods of cal- 
culating and the intelligent interpretati(.)n of results. The ohjects 
taken for analysis include the various acids and alkalies, hleachin.u 
agents, soaps, oils, mordants, dxestulTs, etc. Water analssis for null 
purposes is also .given. 

DYEING 
1 he dyeing taken up during this year has for its chief |)uriJose 
the fann'liai'i/ing of the studiiil with the dilTiMa'nt clTeets to he gained 

61 



REGULAR COURSE— THIRD YEAR 



in the compounding of colors and the production of different classes 
of dyed shades. This naturally leads on to the matching of colors, 
in which considerable practice is given ; and during the latter part of 
the year the student is required to dye the yarn he employs for his 
woven pieces, the shades being matched by the student himself. The 
object of the work is to give the general textile student a compre- 
hensive idea of the possibilities and limitations to be met with in 
bringing into actual existence in the finished fabrics the various color 
harmonies and combinations which have only a potential existence 

in the design. 

ri 

FINISHING |. 

The preceding year's instruction has fitted the student for the' 
more comprehensive treatment which is given the subject in this 
year. He is enabled to grasp more fulh- the reasons for the various 
operations through which some of the fabrics pass in order that they 
may be marketed as this or as that fabric ; and he is instructed in 
the methods of determining the form of finish employed, as well as 
the materials used. The outline which follows gives a general idea 
of the matter covered : 

WORSTEDS AND WOOLENS 

Fulling. — Ancient and modern methods compared. — General time of full- 
ing on various classes of goods. — How to calculate the shrinkage in length and 
widtli to give desired weight. — How and when to flock. — What percentage of 
flocks it is desired to use, conditions considered. 

Heat and pressure, and other conditions in fulling considered. 

Gigging. — The moisture of goods in wet gigging. — Raising for various 
kinds of finish, "doeskin finish," "velvet finish," "dry finish," Scotch or "mel- 
ton finish," "worsted finish" napping. 

Steaming. — Tub steaming or boiling compared with upright steamer or gig. 

Drying. — Comparison of the various drying machines in general use. — 
Effects of tentering in open air compared with machine drying. 

Pressing. — Shearing and pressing further considered. — Final inspection. — 
Measuring, rolling, shading. — Causes of imperfections, their prevention and 
remedy. — Allowances. 

Note. — Students of the second and third year courses assist in finishing 
all the various fabrics produced during the school term. 



62 



COTTON COURSE 



Cotton Course 

This course covers a period of two years, and has heen 
arranged so as to ])rovide instruction in matters hearing 
directly on the manufacture of cottons. The hroader knowl- 
edge of the suhject of textiles is not attained l)v a pursuit 
of this course, hut in some cases, to meet particular needs, 
this specialization may he said to he advantageous. 



Subjects of Study— First Year 

Tlio sul)jfcts (.)f .sUidy takxMi in the first year of this course are 
the same as those pnivideil for the first year of the regular three- 
year textile course. Additidiial time is provided for practical dem- 
onstration in C(ittiin-\arn manufacture, so that the student may 
make a more thorough study of this suliject. While following the 
general lines referred to above, the student conhnes his attention 
to the manipulation of yarns and fabrics of cotton. 



Subjects of Study — Second Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

The methods of phuming weaves into which an extra filling is 
to be introduced for the purpose of producing some figured efi^ect, 
as exemplified in such falirics as "ciTin si)i;)ts," dotted Swisses, etc. 

The princiiiles of planning douMe cloth weaves, embodying the use of 
two or more warps and fillings. — Weave for such special double cloths, as 
pique or welts, Bedford cords, Marseilles, lace effects, etc. — Various methods 
of planning weaves which will produce ornament on the foregoing fabrics. — 
Weaves for different styles of imitation gauze. — Gauze weaving in one or more 

63 



COTTON COURSE 



doupcs. — Tlic cnniliinatiiiii (A dnuiie witli other classes of weaves. — Weaves for 
producing fancy effects Ii.\ means of one don]ie. '!"he I^apjiet form of weaves. — 
Weaves for honeycondis and sinnlar fabrics. — Weaves for fancy madras and 
elieviots. 



ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

l'"tir an nutlinc of tliis sulijcct, sec payc 51, whicli is IdHowl'iI in 
so far as it aijplics to cotton fabrics. 




illolv .SP]NiN]iN'G MULE ( PI \TT M.\KE). 



JACQUARD DESIGN AND COLOR 

The work in this snhjcct follows very closely that of the regu- 
lar course, explained on page 52. \\ ork of a special nature is added, 
such as the analysis of fabrics to olitain card-cutting directions and 
methods of tying up looms for the reiiroduction of the fabric. 

\'arious systems of cost linding, mill luiok-keepin.g, etc., are 
explained, also lectures are dehvered from time to time on the 
many problems involved in Ideaching and linishing of plain and 
fancy cottons. 

65 



COTTON COURSE 



COTTON YARN MANUFACTURE 

The work of this branch of instruction will consist of a more 
detailed study of some of the processes covered in the First Year 
Course (see page 49), and a careful study of pickers, combers and 
the self-acting mule. Considerable attention will be devoted to the 
theory underlying the construction of these three machines. 

General explanation of processes following the spinning, such as reeling, 
doubling, gassing, twisting, spooling, warping and balling yarn for the trade. — 
Engineering features to be considered in the construction of cotton mills: 
Power transmission, methods of heating, ventilation, pluniliing, humidifying. 




\it\v IN BLEACH House, showing boiling kier. 

fire protection, etc. — Calculation on production, cost, methods and organiza- 
tion. — General mill management. 

The course will be conducted by means of lectures and recita- 
tions, and several essays on assigned topics will be required through- 
out the year. Winchester's "Cotton Yarn Manufacturing" will be 
used as a text-book. 

PLAIN HOSIERY KNITTING 

This subject is studied throughout the course with the aim of 
giving the student, not only a general knowledge of the principles 
and construction of the knitted fabrics, but a familiarity with the 
practical workings of many of the best makes of knitting machines— 
ribbers, loopers, etc. 
66 



WOOL AND WORSTED COURSE 



The principles and construction of tlie circular rihb top knitting 
machines, and tlie knittin.n of the different classes of tops, with all 
kinds of the best welts for half hose, wrist and ankle cutTs. Plait- 
ing of all kinds — silk, cotton, etc.; making of legs for children's 
ribbed stockings; also the principle and construction of seamless 
hosiery knitting machines; the assembling, setting and adjusting of 
all parts of the different well-known types employed in making 
infants', boys', and misses' stockings, men's half h()se, ladies' stock- 
ings, incluiling the different st\les of reinforcing, high splice, double 
sole, reinforced heel and toe, plaiting of the different colors, etc. 

WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 

The study of the iiower loom and weaving calculations will fol- 
low the outline found on ]iage 35. The fafirics produced will be 
from the student's designs, and will include a line of goods of a 
varied and instructi\e nature. I >oupe weaving will be performed on 
(litTerent styles of heddles. The stu<lent will perform all the neces- 
sary operations of dressing, beaming, twisting or drawing-in, reed- 
ing, chain Imilding, etc. 

CHEMISTRY AND DYEING 

For outlines of these subjects, see pages 55 and 56. 



Wool and Worsted Course 

This cotirso, covering a period of tw(i _\c;irs, has been 
planned with the idea of providing for stndents wlio intend 
to engage in some form of the mannfactttrc or the selling 
of the products of wool ; hence, all reference to other fibres 
is eliminated, and where this course is described as following 
the outline of some oilier cotirse, it is only done in so far 
as it applies to woolens or worsteds. The results to be 
attained by taking this course are by no means as compre- 
hensive as those which the three-year textile course makes 
possible, but in certain cases it is best suited to the needs 
of the student. The following gives an idea of the studies 
which it inchides. 

67 



WOOL AND WORSTED COURSE 



Subjects of Study — First Year 

In the first year the studies follow the general outline given for 
the first year of the three-year textile course in all but cotton-yarn 
manufacture, Jacquard design, and free-hand drawing. Woolen and 
worsted yarn manufacture is included in this course, and is described 
on page 52, while Jacquard design and free-hand drawing are 
omitted, a few lectures being given, however, on the principles of the 
Jacquard machine. The time which the other classes spend on these 
latter studies is devoted to additional research and practice in yarn 
manufacture, weaving and dveing. 




LECTURE ROOM FOR WOOL SORTING AND GRADING. 



Subjects of Study — Second Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

The instruction in this subject embraces the application of the 
general principles taught in the preceding year. The elementary 
weaves are applied to fabrics composed of two warps and one filling, 
one warp and two fillings, and to full double cloths, attention being 
paid not only to general underlying principles, but also to their use 
in connection with the requirements of definite fabrics. A brief 
outline of the course follows : 

The manner of forming what is termed a double chith weave and the 
principles involved. — Methods of stitching the two fabrics together either 
invisibly or for the purpose of utilizing the stitching in the production of 
figured effects. 

Weaves for fabrics having invisible stitching, such as certain forms of 
trouserings and suitings, beavers, kerseys, meltons. — Weaves for fabrics in 

68 



WOOL AND WORSTED COURSE 



which stripes are formed by means nf tlie stitching, such as hairlines, matel- 
lasscs, cords, etc. — Figured el'fects produced by means of the stitching. — Weaves 
in which the face and 1)ack fabrics interchange, producing figures. — Weaves for 
crepon and other special forms of dress goods. — Weaves for chinchilla and 
similar styles of overcoatings. — The method of placing weaves for three-ply 
fabrics. 

ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

I'"()r an (Hitlinc dt llii.s subject, .see iiage 51, which is followed in 



all that relates tc 



len and worsted \arns and fabrics. 



WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 



ir outline of this subject, see pat 



55. 



ss^(S?^^=^^^^s;-„:l , 




PL.^IN .\ND COLORED, WOOL FIBRE BLENDING, BY THE AID OF TORR.ANCE S.^MPI.INC 

CARD. 



WOOL AND WORSTED YARN MANUFACTURE 

The work in this subject will consist of advanced study of the 
subjects outlined for the previous _vear. Particular attention is paid, 
however, in this, the last year of the course, to the mechanical ad- 
justments necessary to produce the different characters of yarn and 
the adaptability of these adjustments to the different qualities and 
characters of the raw materials froiti which the yarn is made. An 
intimate knowledge of the different parts and the methods of work- 
ing of the "mule" is drilled into the student by the practical handling 
of the machine itself. The same general idea is carried out in the 
study of the machinery employed in worsted yarn manufacture. The 
following is an outline of the subjects: 

69 



WOOL AND WORSTED COURSE 



WOOL SORTING AND BLENDING 

Sorting. — Uses of the sorts. — Different qualities of wool. — Calculations on 
shrinkages and yields in different grades of stock. — The term "Xoil." — \'arious 
kinds of noils. — Mimgo and shoddy. — Kinds and qualities of shoddies. — Ex- 
tracts. — ^^'astes. — Garnetted and other forms. — Flocks. — The methods or proc- 
esses by which they are produced. — Uses and clothing properties of wool sub- 
stitutes. — Consideration of the size and nature of fibres which may be blended 
in order to produce reqtiircd results in the yarn and in the finished fabric. 

WOOLEN YARNS 

Spixxixg. — The history and development of spinning. — Hand jack. — Self- 
operator and self-acting mule. — Present perfection of the mule. — The mule 
head. — Means of actuating the rolls, spindles and carriage. — Backing off. — 




WORSTED GILLING AXD DR.\WIXG ROOM. 

One of the series of rooms devoted to Worsted Drawing and Spinning. 



Winding mechanism. — The quadrant and its functions. — The builder rail and 
method of regulating it. — Automatic regulation of the fallers. — Changing the 
speed of the various parts. — Calculations for twists and drafts. — Calculations 
for finding the labor cost of carding and spinning. — Calculations as to net 
cost of stock used. — Calculations as to allowance for waste and time. — Features 
to be considered in laying out and equipping a woolen carding and spinning 
room, including power transmission, heating, ventilating, humidifying and fire 
protection. — Speed for the difl'erent grades of yarn. 

WORSTED YARNS 

Spinning. — Principles of spinning on the flyer, cap and ring spinning 
frames. — Worsted mule spinning. 

70 



SILK COURSE 



Doubling and Twisting. — Principles of twisting. — Twisting, as performed 
on the flyer, cap, tlimstle and ring frames. — Effect of too much or too little 
twist in lirst or second operation. 

Calculations in Full. — Dral'ts, doiil>lings, stoji motion for gilling and 
drawing, — Working out a set of drawings fur any given count. — Gauge points 
or constants for all practical purpuses. — The slide rule, and how to use it in 
working out drafts and other calculations, — How to find "constant" and how to 
use, and why, — Twisting, — Reeling, — Straight and cross reeling, also weight 
yarn, 

Gknkral. — ()iling (]f the wodl. — Pireakiiig wnol. — Fallers. — Ratch-drag of 
bohhins, lifter iiKition or Iniilders, -.'^tnp motinns. — ITow to weigh yarn, — - 
Averaging sluMiing to make yarn weigh even. — Causes of imperfect yarn. — 
Lumps. — Slugs. — I )iiulile. — Single. — Twitty. — Overdrafted. — Dragged too hard. 
■ — Too much (ir t(jii little speed. — I"'eatures to be considered in laying out and 
equipping a wnrsted mill, including power transmission, heating, ventilating, 
humidity and lire protection, 

CHEMISTRY 

For an dutliiK' n\ tliis .siil)ject, see page 55, 

DYEING 

The siil)ject of dyeiiio as imtliiied ftjr tb.is class includes a study 
of the chemical and physical pr(i]ierties of the wool libre, with an 
application of this knowledge tu a personal understanding of the 
behavior of wool durin.g its iirocessing through the various stages of 
maiiufactiu'e. Ilie general principles of scouring and bleaching are 
tak'cn up, and then a >tudy of the general methods of wool dyeing 
and the a]>p]ication of the differen.t classes of ch'estutfs to this fibre. 
When a general knowledge of this kind has been gained, the student 
next proceeds to the practical study of color compounding and shade 
matching. Considerable practical exjierience is given in the latter, 
and the student is also given an opportunity of carrying on some 
practical dyeing in the dye-house of the school. 

FINISHING 

Worsted and Woolens. — (Same as Second Year Regular Class,) 
— For outline of subjects, see page 56. 



Silk Course 



The recent surprising growth in the silk industry, 
especially in Pennsylvania, has prompted the School to pay 
particular attention to this course, which requires two years 

71 



SILK COURSE 



of Study of silk and matters pertaining to its intelligent 
manufacture. The raw material is considered with its many 
peculiarities, together with the methods of converting it into 
forms suitable for wearing. A thorough training is given in 
the weaves used in silk fabrics, attention being called to the 
manner in which the various forms of interlacing appear 
in the goods. The manner in which silk takes dyestuff, 
together with its affinity for weighting materials and their 




CORNER OF SILK WARPING ROOM. 



effect on its strength, wearing qualities, etc.. are fully con- 
sidered. The many varieties of silk and mixed fabrics are 
carefully studied, and by analysis the student is enabled to 
form accurate estimates of the size and quality of the raw 
materials which they contain, together with the amount of 
loading present. The following gives an idea of the subjects 
included in the course, and where reference is made to other 
courses it is intended that the work thus referred to shall be 
studied in its application to silk. 



SILK COURSE 



Subjects of Study— First Year 

The sulijects studied during the tlrst year of this course include 
Weave formation, analysis and structure of fahrics, color harmony, 
free hand drawing and figured design, Jacquard design, warp preiia- 
ration and weaving, cliemistry and textile fihres. The ground 
covered in these subjects is the same as in the case of the Regular 
course described on i)ages 44 to 50. X(.> attempt at specialization is 
made in the I'lrst year, it Ijeing recognized that the fundamentals are 
the same for all types of materials. Experience has shown that the 
studi'ut takes hold of the problems of silk in liis second year ^o 
decidedly belter advantage, if he has had the oiiportuuity of the 
greater breadth of the first year work of the Regular course, rather 
tlian to lia\-e ])een hampered l)y having handled nothing but silk. 



Subjects of Study— Second Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

The second year of this subject includes a study of the higher 
forms of weaves apidicable to silk, due attention being given to those 
which can be used to advantage in the production of Jacquard 
ellects. Weaves for two or more ]ily fabrics are studied and planned 
uiion stiuared paper, each of the two or more systems of warp and 
hlling being considered in its proper place. 

MethcKls of producing figured effects liy tlie use of tlic multiple fabric 
principle of weaves. — Reversilde and interchangeable multiple fabrics. — Figured 
weaves having warp and filling flushes. — Broche eft'ects. — Weaves for cannele 
forms of ornamentation — Satin gros grains. — Taffeta backed satins. — Double 
faced satin ribbons. — Pearl, flat and pico edges. — Repp and bayadere weaves. 

ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

This sul:)ject is considered largely on the general lines laid d<iwn 
on page ()1, application being made to such fabrics as taffeta, gros 
grain, faille, satins, peau de soie, and rhadime ; as well as to such 
more intricate constructions as satin damasse, brocaded taffetas, 
brocaded gros grains, etc.; for both ril)l>ons and broad silks. 

Methods of determining the size and (|uantity of silk in different 
samples. Ascertaining the reed and ends per dent. The number of 
shafts used and heddles jier inch ]ier shaft. Correct drafts. The 
dram and denier systems of grading silks as to size. Lectures on 
the origin and source of silk. Thrown silk, organzine and tram. 
The process of throwing explained. Sinni silks. Lectures on the 
production of silk threads from the waste of throwing and reeling 
operations. Cost finding systems for ribbons and for broad silks. 

73 



SILK COURSE 



JACOUARD DESIGN AND COLOR 

While the work in this subject covers the points outhned on page 
52, additional time is spent as follows : 

Mountings. — Mountings are prepared and the practice of placing 
them in the loom and in tying-up is afforded for fancy silk fabrics, 
such as novelty dress goods, necktie stuffs, upholstery fabrics and 
more complex forms of fabrics. Mountings with shafts in the neck 
cords, and with shafts below the comberboard. 

Designing. — Designs are made in color, cloth size, and enlarged 
to workable state for card cutting for such highly ornamental fabrics 
as brocades, damasks, chair coverings, labels, dress goods, etc. 
Determination of weighting, estimation of size of silk before boiling 
off and of amount of weighting. 

Card Cutting. — Cards are cut for the designs which the student 
makes, and card-cutting directions are worked out from various 
fabrics. 

WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 

For outline of study in this subject, see page 55. 

CHEMISTRY 

For outline of study in this subject, see page 55. 

DYEING 

In this subject the attention of the student is first called to the 
physical structure and chemical composition of the silk fibre, so that 
he may understand its behavior when subjected to the different 
chemical and physical processes used during the progress of its 
manufacture. The methods of conditioning, of boiling oft', and 
bleaching of silk are studied. The application of the different classes 
of dyestuft's is then taken up, and various methods of mordanting 
and weighting are practiced in such a manner as to give the student 
an intelligent insight into the working of these processes. Consid- 
erable attention is paid to the methods of ascertaining the character 
and amount of weighting in silk goods, and also the determining of 
the amount of silk in mixed goods. The chemical principles under- 
lying these matters are constantly held before the mind of the 
student, who acquires his knowledge in a practical manner through 
experimenting on concrete examples. 



74 



JACQUARD DESIGN COURSE 



Jacquard Design Course 

This course has Ijcen ])r(ivi(le(l to meet a growing 
demaiul of those who desire instruction relating directly to 
such necessary knowledge as is required in the production 
of the various kinds of figured textiles, such as damask, 
dress goods, draperies, tloor coverings, etc. 

Two years are retpiired for its completion. 



Subjects of Study — First Year 

In the studies <if \\ea\c fi iniiatinn, analy.sis and structure of 
fabrics, color harnicmy, free-liand drawini;. lij^ured desiL;n and warp 
preparation and \vea\in,L;, the class follows the outline given for the 
first year of the ddn-ee-\'ear Textile Course. (See pages 44 to 50.) 

JACQUARD DESIGN 

Idle course of instruction in this subject has been arranged with 
the \ievv of providing the student with the necessary means of 
planning figured effects and adapting to them the knowdedge of 
weave formation and structure of faliric. 

The Ma! hixk. — A thorough study of the machine, such as is 
jnirsued 1\\' students in the regular course, page 49, is augmented 
by carefully measured drawings of the various types of Jaccjuards, 
and pro\ision is made for a study of the machine in sections. 

MouxTiXG. — The methods of mounting according to the hVench 
and English systems are carefully studied, and practical work in the 
threading of comberboards and calculations for same is provided for. 

The methods of obtaining enlarged repeats of pattern and fancy 
effects in the fabric are explained, and drawings are made of the 
various forms of tie-ups to produce these results. 

Such forms fjf tie-ups ami mountings arc prepared as straight through, 
point or center tie, combinations of straight and point, repeated effects in one 
repeat. — Original schemes of tie-ups for fancy effects in single cloths. 

75 



JACOUARD DESIGN COURSE 



nKSicxixc;. — Original sketclics for various styles of ornamenta- 
tion, fri:)m historical and (loral motives, are made in tlie color to be 
used in tlu' \vo\-en fabric. 

Calculations for desi.gn or point paper for the various textures 
are made, and designs are enlarged to workable state from the cloth- 
size sketches. 




FIKir ANll PliVVKR CARD STAMfINC 



The Idling in and ])lacing of wea\es on the enlarged design is 
made an im]>(irtant fi'alure, and the effect the change of weave ]jro- 
duces on (he linished fabric is carefully explained. 

Designs are made for such fabrics as damask, table covers, 
dress goods, draperies, etc. 

C.\RD CuTTiNC. — Considerable study is given to the hngering for 
l'"rench, American and line index stamping machines, together with 
the i)ractice of cutting cards for the designs made liy the student. 

Card-cutting directions are worked out for various effects in 
single and extra filling falirics. 



n 



JACQUARD DESIGN COURSE 



Subjects of Study— Second Year 

WEAVE FORMATION 

The work of the second year of this course being confined 
largely to figured effects, all the higher forms of weaves are studied 
in their application to the Jacquard machine. Weaves for two or 
more ply falirics are studied and planned upon the squared paper, 
each of the two or more systems of warp and of filling being con- 
sidered in its proper place. Methods of producing figured efl^ects by 




RLIJ AND T.\PESTRy WE.WING. 

the use of the multiple fabric principle of weaves. — Figured weaves 
having warp and filling flushes. — Weaves for brocatelles, and two 
or three filling brocades and damasks. — Pile fabrics for floor cover- 
ings. — Weaves for all fancy figured fabrics. 

ANALYSIS AND STRUCTURE OF FABRICS 

A general outline of the work as followed is given on page 50. 
The yarns and fabrics covered include those of cotton, wool, worsted 
and silk of a higher and more intricate nature. Fancy figured fabrics 
are studied and calculations made for the production of brocatelles, 
figured ribbons, shoe pulls, brocaded effects, carpets, and all classes 
of Jacquard fancy fabrics. 
7S 



JACQUARD DESIGN COURSE 



JACQUARD DESIGN 

The studies of the first year are continued, and work of an 
advanced nature is followed. Especial attention is paid to the actual 
processes n\ |)nMlucin,L; li-ures in more coin])lex fabrics, and produc- 
in.ii' desis^ns in the cloth for the hi-her tirades of stuffs. 

i iif: .M.\( II ixe. — The special machines devoted to increasing: 
speed and easier action on the warp are carefully analyzed, and 
measured drawings of the parts made. Alachines devoted to the pro- 
duction of special effects are studied and their advantages noted. 




ilA.\]l-\\l',A\ IM, LAI.UKAIOKV 



•ARD Loom,- 



Ihe machiiR-s treated are; Raise and drop, d.uihle lift, dnul,le and single 
cylinder, twdling machines, drop shed machines, lenn and the working ot 
doupes and slackeners, ingrain and Brussels machines. 

MouxTixc— The o])portunity is afforded for the student to 
thread the coml)erl)oard and tie up looms for varied effects of design. 

Mountings for controlling two or more warps and the placing of 
shafts in the neck cords and below the comberboard are prepared 
and drawing.s made. 

Ihe m<iunting of i;russels and ingrain machines are treated at 
length, and opportunity is afforded the student to study the details 
closely. 

Such mountings are prcj-ared as f,,Ihnvs: Section ties.— Combination of 
harness and jacjuard.— Shaft lashmg.— Cnipuund liarness.— Carpet ties. 

79 



JACQUARD DESIGN COURSE 



Designing. — As colur is (Hie of the essential features of a design, 
it is used to a great extent in the origination of elaliorate designs. 

The planning on s(|uared or point paper of faltrics having two 

or more warps and Idlings and the caleidations for the proper size 

pa])ers for the enlarged working designs are given ctinsideraldc 
attention. 

llesi'tiiis are prepared in a coiiinuTcial way for Ijrucades. linicatelles, rever- 
siblr rolns, hlaiikuts, two and tlirre lllling damasks, gobelins, terries, ingrain 
carpets. Krnssels, tai.estry, nioquette. etc., carpets, coat labels, sli.ie pulls, etc. 





POWER WEAVE KOO.M JACQUARD LOOMS 

For silks and draperies 



C.\Rn Cutting. — Cards are cut for the designs made, and all the 
card-cutting directions are worked out. hoth from designs and the 
woven fahric. Alechanical methods of rejieating cards and automatic 
devices for cutting are explained. 

WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 



For outline of this suliject. see page 55. 



81 



COURSE IN CHE:\nSTRY, DYEING AND PRINTING 



THE COURSE IN CHEMISTRY, DYEING 
AND PRINTING 

Tlic course in Clu'inistry, Dyeiiii;- and l^rinting extends 
over a period of three years, and is especially designed to 
give a scientific teclmical education to tliose who desire to 
embrace in their ])rofession these ])ranches of industrial 
technologv. 

A studv of the materials and })rocesses is carried on 
with special reference to this end. 

Dveing is an art immediateh" associated with chemistry 
and is one of the chief ramifications of that fundamental 
science. As an art it has long been practiced, hut it is only 
of late years that scientific methods have been introduced 
into this stud\', and thr(.)Ugh this means of develoi)ment 
it is rajjidlv assuming a position in the front rank of 
applied science. 

The studv of dveing in this School is carried on 
with the idea of inculcating into the mind of the student a 
scientific conception of what he is doing; he is taught to 
ex])eriment in an intelligent manner — not to take things 
for granted, but to know tlu' reason wh}-. Moreover, 
his experiments are not limited to the laboratory pot and 
kettle, where his results are often deluding, but the student 
carries r)n his d\eing in a manner that enables him t(_^ 
encounter an<l overcome the jielty diHiculties and changing 
conditions of the mill and dye house. 

The technical examination and \-aluations of commer- 
cial [)ro(lucls is given es])ecial attention and a high stand- 
ard of manipulative skill and accuracy in experimental work 
is insisted ui)on, for it is such training that fits the student 
for accur.ate and scientific results in after )-ears, when he is 
called ujioii to make a i)ractical ai)])licalion of his knowledge 
in an intelligent and sivillful manner. 

83 



COURSE IN CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND PRINTING 



Subjects of Study for the Three-Year Course 

FIRST YEAR-FIRST TERM 

Chemistry I. — General Inorganic. 

Dyeing I. — Physical and Chemical Properties of the Textile Fibres. 

Dyeing II. — Technology of Scouring and Bleaching. 

Dyeing III. — Principles of Dyeing; Elementary Course. 

FIRST YEAR-SECOND TERM 

Chemistry II. — Qualitative Analysis. 

Chemistry \'I. — Chemical Calculations. 

Dyeing II. — Technology of Scouring and Bleaching. 

Dyeing III. — Principles of Dyeing; Elementary Course. 

Dyeing I\'. — Principles of Shade Compounding and Matching. 

SECOND YEAR-FIRST TERM 

Chemistry Ilia. — Quantitative Analysis; Gravimetric. 

Chemistry I\'a. — Organic Chemistry ; Aliphatic Series. 

Chemistry IXa. — Textile Chemistry; Analysis of Fibres, Yarns and 

Fabrics. 
Dyeing V. — Color Mixing and Spectroscopy. 
Dyeing VI. — Principles of Dyeing; Intermediate Course. 

SECOND YEAR-SECOND TERM 

Chemistry Illb. — Quantitative Analysis; \'olumctric. 

Chemistry I\'b. — Organic Chemistry; Aromatic Series. 

Chemistry V. — Industrial Chemistry. 

Chemistr}' IXb. — Textile Chemistry; Analysis of Dyestuffs and 

Mordants. 
Dyeing VI. — Principles of Dyeing; Intermediate Course. 

THIRD YEAR-FIRST TERM 

Chemistry \'. — Industrial Chemistry. 

Chemistry \TI. — Technical Analysis. 

Chemistry \TII. — Chemistry of Dyestuffs. 

Chemistry IXc. — Textile Chemistry; Testing Dyestuff Reactions and 

Adulterations. 
Dyeing A'll. — Textile Printing. 
Dj'cing VIII. — Principles of Dyeing; Advanced Course. 

THIRD YEAR-SECOND TERM 

Chemistry V. — Industrial Lliemistry. 
Chemistry VII. — Technical Analysis. 
Chemistry \'III. — Chemistry of Dyestuffs. 
Dyeing VII. — Textile Printing. 

Dyeing VIII. — Principles of Dyeing; Advanced Course. 
84 



COURSE KM CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND PRINTING 



CHEMISTRY I. (knieral Inorganic 

The so'.Ti-al pr..i.frtirs ,,f niattcr.— Simple an. I cnnipoui,,! bn, lies.— Laws 
of cliemical eniiil.mati.m.— |-:ienieiits, at..iiis an.l iiinleciiles.— The atomic thenvy. 
— dieniical ealenlatiuns.— Prei.aration, ehassifieatinn ami chemical behavior of 
the chief elements and their enmiMuinds, cnmprisini,' the non-metals and metals, 
with special reference to those of commercial im|.ortance. 

This course is carricfl on by means of lectures and recitations 
coupled with a lar^e amount of laboratory work on the properties 
and preparation of chemical elements and their compounds. 

CHEMISTRY II. Qualitative Analysis 

The analytical classification of the metals.— Characteristic tests for the 
dilTerent elements. — Detection of bases and acids in their compounds.— 
S(d\ing ,:,f analytical pr.,bleiiis.— Writing of reactions. 

This coiu-se is arranged with a view of makm.L; the student 
thoroughly familiar with the characteristic reactions whereliy the 
diherent chemical elements may he reco.gni/ed and distinguished 
from (ine another in their luuueroiis condiinations. The w(.irk is 
earned on largel)- by exueriments, and the student is required to 
soke projilems gi\-en to him for analysis. 

CHEMISTRY Ilia. Quantitativo Analysis: Gravimetric 

General jirocedure in. analytical methods; sources of error and their 
prevention. — Preliminary manipulations: use of analytical balances.— Prepara- 
tion of pure salts.— Methods of precipitation and treatment of precipitates.— 
Typical gravimetric analyses of the metals; aluminum, chromium. ir.,n, 
calcium, copper, lead, etc.— .\nalysis of compoun.ls containim,- several metals. - 
Gravimetric estimation of the acid radicals; suli.luiric acid, chlorine, carbon 
dioxide, etc.— Exercises in the analyses of alloys, minerals, etc.— Principles «[ 
electrcilytic analysis. 

Ihis course is conducted by lectures, recitations and a large 
amount of laboratory work, at first on pure chemicals and later on 
conuuercial ])r<iducts. 

CHEMISTRY III b. Quantitative Analysis: Volumetric 

General principles ..f volumetric procedure.— Classification of volumetric 
methods.— Use and calibration of Kia.luated apparatus.— Preparation of normal 
and standard solutions.— Use an.l limitations of indicators. — .Mkalimetry an.l 
acidimetry; typical analyses of aci.ls an.l alkalies.- N'.dumetric metln.ds by oxi- 
dation and re.luction.— \-.dumetric meth,,ds of precipitati..n.— Analyses of 
carbon c.mpoun.ls by c..inbusti..n. 

This course is a continuation of the preceding. The subject is 
conducted on as practical lines as possible, and ommercial methods 
are given where\-er advisalile. 

CHEMISTRY IV. Organic Chemistry 

General pr.q.erties of the compoun.is ,d" earb,.n.— Recognition an.l estiiiia- 
ti..n .if carl.. in. hydrogen, oxygen, nitr.igeii. the halogens, sulphur and phos- 
phorus in organic bodies.— Calculations .if |,ercentage c..in]iosition and molecu- 
lar f.irmula. C lassitfcation of organic c.mpounds.— The aliphatic series; the 

85 



COURSE IN CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND PRINTING 



hydrocarbons; halogen derivatives; alcohols; ethers; aldehydes; ketones; the 
fatty acids and their derivatives. — The theory of organic radicals. — Study of 
the esters; sulphur compounds; amines and cyanogen compounds; metallic 
compounds. — The unsaturated hydrocarbons and their derivatives. — The car- 
bohydrates, and dibasic acids. — Nitrogenous and proteid substances. — The 
aromatic compounds: benzene and its homologues. — The aromatic nitro and 
amido compounds. — Diazo and azo compounds. — The aromatic acids and their 
derivatives. — Triphenylmethane derivatives. — Naphthalene and its compounds. 
— Anthracene and its compounds. — Heterocyclic compounds; the alkaloids. 

This course is conducted by lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work. It covers in a comprehensive manner the whole field of 
organic chemistry, though special stress is laid on those portions 
particularly- relating to the textile industries. 

The analysis and synthesis of typical bodies is undertaken with 
the view of illustrating the methods of building up artificially the 
numerous derivations of carbon which find such an extended appli- 
cation in the manufacturing industries. 

CHEMISTRY V. Industrial Chemistry 

Industrial processes in chemical manufacture. — Fuels ; water. — Sulphur 
and its compounds; technology of sulphuric acid. — .Salt and hydrochloric acid. 
— The soda industries. — The chlorine intlustry, and chlorine compounds; 
bleaching agents. — The nitric acid, ammonia, and potash industries. — Fertil- 
izers; cements and glass. — Ceramic industry. — Pigments. — Minor chemical 
preparations; peroxides, oxygen and sulphates; cyanides; permanganates. — 
The organic industries. — The destructive distillation of wood, bones, and coal. — 
Mineral oils. — Vegetable and animal oils, fats and waxes. — Soap, candles and 
glycerine. — Resin and gums. — Starch, dextrin and glucose; sugar. — The fer- 
mentation industries. — Explosives. — The textile industries ; fibres, bleaching, 
mordants; dyestuf!'s; dyeing; printing. — Paper and leather industries. — (!ilue. 

This course is based on text-book stud}', supplemented when 
necessary by lectures. Supplementary reading on special topics 
under discussion, and numerous drawings of industrial apparatus 
are required. 

CHEMISTRY VI. Chemical Calculations 

Calculations of mass, volume, density and weight. — Gas pressure. — Ther- 
mometry and barometry. — Chemical formulas; molecular weight and percentage 
composition. — Chemical equations. — Calculations concerning heat changes. — 
Strength of solutions; hydrometry. — Calculations relating to the dye-house and 
mill, and t(j technical chemistry in general. 

In this course particular attention is given to the solution of 
technical prol:)lems. 

CHEMISTRY VII. Technical Analysis 

The analysis and valuation of commercial articles occurring in the dye- 
house and mill. — Acids, alkalies, bleaching agents, soaps, oils, tannins, mor- 
dants, and dyeing and scouring materials. — -\nalysis of water for industrial 
purposes. — .\nalysis of finishing materials. — Fuel and Gas. 

This course offers to the student a means of becoming acquainted 
with chemical technology and the valuation of commercial products. 
86 



COURSE IN CHEMISTRY, DYEIXG AND PRINTING 



A consick'ralilc nnnihrr of tecliiiical analx^cs must he completed by 
each student under the (hrectimi (if the instructor. 

CHEMISTRY VIII. Chemistry of Dyestuffs 

Distillation ,,f coal tar.— tiitt riiR.liatc iinMluct.s used in tlic- manufacture 
nf dyestuffs.- -The nitni and nitrdSii dyes. — Azo dyes.— Ilyilrazemes. — Stilljene 

dyes. — Diphenylniethane and Triiilienylinethane dyes. — Xantliene colors. 

Acridine dyes.— Anthracene dyes.— (Juinone-Iniide dyes. — Indigo and Indigoid 
dyes. — Thiazol colors. — Sulidiur dyes. — .\niline black. — Coloring principles of 
the chief natural dyes. 

The oliject of this course is to give the student the chemical 
prmciple^ underlyin- the luanufacture of dyestuffs. Before this 
.study can he pursuech a knowledge of organic cheiuistry must be 
acquired. The technology and cliemistry of the coal-tar colors is 
studiefl m a com'se of lectures, supplemented liy considerable 
e.xpt'rnnental work in the lalioratory, in which the student is required 
to prepare many of the intermediate com]iounds and dyestuft's. 

CHEMISTRY IX. Textile Chemistry 

Chemical examination of textile fibres. — Analysis of mixed yarns and 
fabrics, consisting of wool, silk, cotton, linen, artificial silk, etc.— Conditioning 
of textile materials.— Determination of sizing, and estimation of oil and grease 
in fabrics. ^Estimation of nnneral matters in fabrics. — Examination of lileached 
goods for quality. 

Determination of the nature and estimation of the amount of mordants 
on wool and cotton fabrics. — Determination of the nature of sizings and 
other ingredients in falirics.— Determination of the nature and amount of 
weighting on silks. 

Identification and estimation of adulterants in dyestutTs. — Determination 
of proper classihcation of dyestuffs.—Capillary speed of dyestuffs; detection 
of mixed dyes.— Testing of dyestuffs on the lilire f..r the purposes of identifi- 
cation.— Practice in the analysis of dyes in bulk and on the fibre. 

This course is very essential to the student who desires to lit 
himself thoroughly for the p<.isition of dyer, chemist in a textile 
mill or commission house, or chemist in a dyestufT manufactory, 
and has been specially designed with these ends in view. A large 
amount of practical work in the analysis and testing of the various 
materials given is required of each student. 

DYEING I. Physical and Chemical Properties of the Textile Fibres 

Classification of textile fibres.— Study of the physical and chemical ]>roper- 
ties of the various animal and vegetalile fibres. — Microscopy id' the fibres. 

This course is intended to make the student familiar with the 
\anous lilires tliat are employed for textde purposes. He is required 
to study the microscopy of typical lifires and in this luanner become 
familiar with the structure of fibres of different origin. Xumerous 
samples must be analyzed to determine tlie character of the hl)rcs 
present. 

87 



COURSE IN CJIKMISTRV, DYEING AND PRINTING 



DYEING II. Technology of Scouring and Bleaching 

Study iti till- inipmilirs dccuiring in raw wonl. — Stt'e|)iiig and scouring 
wiiol. — Ry-|iriidiicts from scniuinK lii|uiirs. — Scnuriiif,' cloth and yarn. — Water 
for scouring inu-imscs.— Study of tlu- .sidvi-nt nietlmds fur scouriuK wool. — 
Soaps for scouring purposes. — Influence of diflerent scouring agents and con- 
ditions on the jihysica! ]iroperties of wmil. — Scouring and hoiling-out of cot- 
ton. — Bleaching of wool: stoving with sul|>hiu' dio.xide: Ideaching with sodium 
and h\'driigen ]ier(ixides, pntassiuni permanganate, etc. — lileaching cjf cottcju; 
use of cliloride of lime; study of the proper conditions for Ideaching. — Linen 
bleaching. 

A lIi()r()noli coiir.'^c' cif lectures on the stiliject is given. A con- 
stant ret'erence is made to the cheniistr\- of the ]>ri)cesses with a 
chemical study of the materials employed and the Ijy-products 
ohtained. .V considerable amoinit of e.\]ierimental work suii])lements 
the lecture course. 



DYEING III. Principles of Dyeing: Elementary Course 
Acid, Basic, Substantive, Developed, Sulphur and Mordant Dyes 

General methods of \vo(d dyeing: use o{ neutral and acid baths. — After- 
treatment of acid dyes with metallic salts.— ?*1 eth. ids of applying ba.lly leveling 
dyes. — General method of applyuig acid dyes to cotton. — Application of basic 
dyes to wind. — Methoils of mnrd:inting cotton ami the dyeing with I)asic cidors. 
— Study .d" the different metallic salts used fnr fixing. 

General methoils fd' dyeing wool -.vith substantive colors. — .\fter treatment 
of substanti\e dyes on wool with metallic salts. — (.ieneral methods id' dyeing 
cnttim with substantive dyes. — Increasing the fastness of cotton dyes. — h'orma- 
tion oi de\'eloped colors. — Nature and application ijf sidphur dyes. — X'arious 
methoils of m.jrdanting wool. — Gomparison of different assistants. 

The method of irsino tlie different dyestuffs is thoroughly studied 
in a course of lecttu'es. 'Jdie student carries otit a large numher of 
e.vperiments with ditlerent dyes on small test skeins. In this way he 
becomes familiar not only with the diffe'reiit methttds of applying 
the dyestufis but also ac(iuircs a fund of knowledge respecting the 
relative shades and \alues of a large nmnber of dyes. The student 
recei\'es detailed criticism of all his experiments. 

l-Iesides the experimental dyeing of snuill test skeins, each stu- 
dent is reijuired to help in tlie dyeing of larger (|uantities of various 
classes of goods which are operated upon in the well-ecjnipped dye 
house of tlie school. Lots of from 1 to 50 pounds are constantly 
being dyed, including hxjse stock, yarns and ])iece goods, so the 
student has the opportunity of doing considerable practical dye- 
house work. 

89 



COURSE IN CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND PRINTING 



DYEING IV. Principles of Shade Compounding and Matching 

Primary, secondary and tertiary colors. — Preparation of tints of single 
dyes. — Compounding of two dyes in different percentages. — Preparation of 
colors containing three dyestuffs. — [Matching of samples on wool; on cotton. — 
Matching colors from one class of fabrics to another. 

In this course the student hecomes famihar with the mixing 
qualities of dyestuffs and obtains a good idea of just how to 
synthesize a compound shade by the use of a few dyestuffs. The 
vakie of shade matching is early impressed on the student and, as 
aptitude and accuracy in this can only be acquired by practice, each 
student is required to match a large number of shades on different 
classes of goods and with different classes of dyes. Throughout the 
dyeing course he is constantly called upon to match colors to be 
dyed on large lots of materials. 




LECTURE KOO-M LlU-.Ml.STRV .A.XD DYEING. 



DYEING V. Color Mixing and Spectroscopy 

Study of the phenomena of light and the nature and cause of color. — 
Nature of color in dyestuffs and pigments. — Color absorption in the mixing 
of dyes. — The spectroscope; its construction and use; its application to 
the study of color in dyeing and in dyestufls. — The tintometer and its use. — 
Dichroism in dyes. — Effect of dichroism in compounding dyes and in color 
matching. — Effect of character of surface on colors of dyed goods. — Effect of 
artiticial light on colors. 

The laboratory is equipped with the very best forms of spectro- 
scopes, together with a Lovibund tintometer especially designed for 
textile work. The spectra of a number of representative dyes are 
plotted by the student, and the mixing qualities of the dyes are 
90 



COURSE IN CHEMISTRY, DYEING AND PRINTING 



deduced tlierefrom : and this scientific work is supplemented by 
practical dye tests in the lahoratorx . These spectroscopic studies 
show the nature and properties of different dyestuffs which cannot 
he .gained hy any other means. 

DYKING VI. Principles of DyeinKf; Intermediate Course 

Sulphur Dyes; Mineral Dyes and the Natural Dyewoods ; Dyeing Union 

Goods; Half-Silks; Ciloria ; Preparation and Dyeing of Chlored 

Wool ; Dyeing of Artificial Silk and Jute 

Clu-mistry ,if the sulphur dyes; general methods of applying the same.— 
Precautions to he taken with sulphur dyes; functions of the different agents 
in the dye-hatli. — Methods of aftertreating and top|iing the suljihur dyes. 

General principles of applying mineral pigments in dyeing; their advantages 
and disadvantages. — The principal natural dye woods still in use; Iogw(jod. 

fustic, archil, cochineal. — Methods of applying these to wool and cotton^ The 

minor vegetable coloring matters; cuteh, etc. 

General principles to he followed in dyeing cotton-wool falirics.— Adapta- 
bility of the different classes of dyestuffs.— Cross-dyeing of cott.)n warp goods.— 
Production of single color and novelty effects.— The general methods em- 
ploye. 1 in dyeing cotton-silk material.— Production of single or solid colors; 
multi-colored effects.— The metln.ds of dyeing gloria or wool-silk fabrics. 

.\ction of cldorine and bleaching p.iwder on wool.— Properties of chlored 
wool; unshrinkable wo.d. —Action of chlored wool t. .wards dyestuffs: proiluc- 
tion of novelty effects.— Methods of dyeing artificial silk. 

In this course, the work pursued is laru;elv an extension of 
Dyeing 111. 

While the mineral and vegetahle dyes are at present but little 
used in comparison with the extensive application of the coal-tar 
dyes, their historical importance is very great, and in certain cases 
some of them still possess considerable value. 

The dyeing of materials containing more than one fibre is mainlv 
carried out with those dyestuffs which will have been studied in 
detail in previous work. On account of the importance of this 
branch of dyeing, much time is spent thereon and numerous color- 
matches to given samples are retiinred. 

DYEING VII. Textile Printing 

The essential elements in printing. —The machine; study of its different 
parts.— The different thickening agents used in printing pastes; study of their 
different properties and values.— Comparison of the different styles in print- 
ing.— The jiigment style.— The direct printing style.— Steam style with basic 
colors.— Mordant style.— .\niline black i.rinting. — Developed style with diazo- 
tized colors.— Printing of indigo and other "vaf" dyes.— Resist style.— Discharge 
style; white and colored discharges. 

There is a larger mmiber and greater variety of chemicals and 
chemical processes used in printing than there is in dyeing, and it is 
the object of this course to give the student the underlying prin- 
ciples of the difi'erent methods of printing. The printing laboratory 
of the school is furnished with two experimental iirinting machines 
and a number of engraved rollers adapted to the various styles of 

91 



COURSE IX CHEMISTRY, DYEIXG AND PRINTING 



printing. The course consists of an extensive scries of lectures and 
considerable laboratory work in the preparation of different colored 
patterns illustrating the different styles and methods in vogue and 
the use of the different classes of dyestuft's. 




PRIXTIXG LABORATORY. 



DYEING VIII. Principles of Dyeing; Advanced Course 

Developed Dyes ; Indigo and other Vat-dyes ; Aniline Black; Turkey Red; 

Silk Dyeing and Weighting; Resist Dyeing; Preparation of Pigment 

Lakes ; Methods of Softening, Scrooping and W'eigliting 

Cottons; Methods of Waterproofing 

The chemistry of the developed dyes; study of the dyeing, diazotizing 
and developing processes. — Coupled colors. — The naphthol colors. — History of 
indigo dyeing; methods of extraction and preparation of the dyestuff. — The 
chemical principles of indigo dyeing. — Methods of dyeing cotton with indigo; 
of dyeing wool. — Comparison of natural indigo with the synthetic product. — 
Preparation and use of indigo extract. — Yat dyes other than indigo. — The 
chemical princii)les involved in the dyeing of aniline lilack. — (.^ne-I)ath black: 
steam and aged blacks. — The chemical principles of Turkey-red dyeing. — 
Comparison of old process and new process Turkey red. 

Application of different classes of dyes to silk; the acid dyes; basic dyes; 
substantive dyes; mordant dyes. — Methods of brightening, lustering and scroop- 
ing silk. — Use of different mordants on silk for purposes of weighting. — Dye- 
ing of weighted blacks; iron and tannin weighting. — Weighting of silk for 
dyeing colors; tin weighting. — Methods of producing white and colored resist 
effects in woolens and worsteds. — The chemistry of lake pigments. — Use of 
coal-tar dyes in the preparation of pigments. — The minor uses of dyestufts. 

This course embraces the study of those dyes requiring special 
methods of application and considerable knowledge of organic chem- 
istry. Also methods of producing special effects are given consider- 
able attention. 
92 



COURSES OF STUDY— EVENING SCHOOL 



Evening School 



111 (irdiT to allow those ciiiploxcd dnrini^' the day to 
receive some of the benehts and iirolit 1)\' the facilities for 
stiulv which this School iiia\- altoi'd, courses covering" all 
branches of ^'eneral textile instruction have been arranged 
to be carried on in the evening. In prei)aration of these 
courses, the aim has been to cover, in a general \va\', what is 
given in the da\' chisses ; th.e sliortness of time, however, 
renders it impossible to treat exhaustivelv anv particular 
branch, and it is ex])ecte(l that the instruction given in the 
classes will l)e supplemented by a considerable amount of 
home study. 

Evening School Schedule 

Showing the evenings on wliieh are tauglit th'- suhjects stated 
on pages 97, 99, 101, ]I)J, 10.^, 104, 105. 



MONDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


FRIDAY 


lik inent,ir> Weave 
h'orniatiiin and 
Fabric .Structure 


Intermediate Weave 

h'ormation and 

Fabric .Structure 


Ad\'ance.l Weave 

Form.ition and 
Fabric Structure 


Internieiliate Calcula- 
tions and 
Fabric i\iialysis 


.Ndvanced (■alcnlati.)iis 
Fabric .Vnalysis 


I'lenicntavy < 'aleula- 

tioHs ,in.l I'aliric 

Analysis 


Woolen ^'arn 
Manufacture 
( Advanced ) 


Silk and Fine Cotton 

[•abnc Anal>sis.-ni,l 

Calculations 


Loom Fixing and 

Study of the Lower 

Loom 


.Special and Advanced 
Jacquard Design 


Elementary Warp 
Preparation and Weaving 

Adwineed Cotton \'arn 
.\l anufacture 


Elementary 
Jacquard Design 


Raw Materials ,.f the 

Wool In.lustriesand 

Calculations 


Worsted 

^'arn Manufacture 

Drawing and Spinning 


Advanced Design 
Coloring 


Woolen Yarn 
Manufacture 
( l<"lementary ) 


Cotton Y.irn 
Manufacture 


Elementary 
Hosiery Knitting 


h^lementary Design 
Coloring 


.Advanced Llosiery 
Knitting 


Chemical Laboratory 


Chemical T-aboratory 


Lecture in Elementary 
Chemistry 


Lecture in Elementary 
and Advanced Dyeing 


Dyeing Laboratory 


Dyeing Laboratory 



93 



COURSES OF STUDY— EVENING SCHOOL 



Courses of Study 

The following are the regular courses and are recommended 
as advantageous outlines of study. If, however, a person does not 
desire to follow any of these courses, preferring to confine his atten- 
tion to certain of the subjects which are given on pages 97 to 105, 
he can do so in accordance with the schedule shown on page 93. 

See page 105 for special Jacquard and silk work. 



Course A 



This course is recommended to those who are interested in cottons. 



MONDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



FRIDAY 



First Year 



Elementary 
Weave Forination 

and 
Fabric Structure 



Elementar\' i Elementary 

Warp Preparation Calculations 

and and 

Weaving Fabric Analysis 



Second Year 



Third Year 



Intermediate 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric ^Analysis 



Hosiery Knitting 



Intermediate 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 



Cotton Yarn 
Manufacture 



Advanced 

Advanced Cotton [Weave Formation 

Yarn Manufacture i _ , . ^i^" 

' Fabric Structure 



Course B 

This course is recommended to those who desire to study the application 
of Jacquard Designs to Te.xtiles in general. 



MONDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



FRIDAY 



First Year 



Second Year 



Third Year 



Elementary 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Strvicture 



Advanced 
Jacquard Design 



Advanced 
Design Coloring 



\\'oolen Yarn 

Manufacture 

(Carding) 



Elementary 
Jacquard Design 



Intermediate 
\\'eave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 



Worsted Yarn 
Manufacture 



Elementary 
Design Colorinc 



Advanced 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 



94 



COURSES OF STUDY— EVENING SCHOOL 



Course C 



iiii-se is recuniiiKiiddl I,, |li,,sc wlin are interested in both 
cottons and woolens. 





MONDy\Y 


WEDNESDAY 


FRIDAY 


First Year 


Elementary 
Weave I'^cn ination 

an.i 
Fabric Structure 


Elementary 

Warp Preiiaration 

and 

Weaving 


P'lementary 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 


Second Year 


Intermediate 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 


Intermediate 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 


Loom Fixing 

and 
Study of the 
Power Loom 


Raw ^^aterials 
Third Year ; of tlie 

Wool Indnstries 


Advanced 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 


Advanced 

Weave Formation 

and 

Fabric Structure 



Course D 

This course is reconinu-ndrd tu those who arc particularly interested 
in wool and worsted stuffs. 



First Year 



Second Year 



Third Year 



MONDAY 



Elementary 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 



Intermediate 
Calculations 



Fabric Structure 



Raw :\latrria]s of 
the Won! In.lustnes 



WEDNESDAY 



Woolen Yarn 

Manufacture 

(Carding) 



FRIDAY 



Elementary 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric .Structure 



Intermediate Weave 

l^'ormation and 

Fabric Structure 



Ailvanced Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 



Worsted Yarn 
IManufacture 



Advanced 

Weave F~ormation 

and 

Fabric Structure 



Course E 



I his course is arranged for t!i,,se wh<, desire to give special attention 
to upholstery and similar Jacquard work. 



First Year 



Second Year 



Third Year 



MONDAY 



Elementary 
Weave F'ormation 

and 
Fabric Structure 



Advanced 
Jacquard Design 



Special 

Jacquard Design 

and coloring 



WEDNESDAY 



FRIDAY 



Elementary 
Design Coloring 



Intermediate 
Weave Formation 



Fabric .Structure 



Elementary 
Jacquard Design 



Card Stamping 
Jac(|uard .\iount- 
ing and Weaving 



Silk and Fine Cotton 
Fabric Analysis 
and Calculations 



Advanced 

Weave Formation 

and 

Fabric Analysis 



95 



COURSES OF STUDY— EVENING SCHOOL 



Course F 



This course is recommended to those who desire to couple the study 
of Jacquard design with that of general fabrics. 





MONDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


FRIDAY 


First Year 


Elementary 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 


Elementary 
Design Coloring 


Elementary 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 


Second Year 


Intermediate 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 


Intermediate 
Weave Formation 

and 
Fabric Structure 


Elementary 
Jacquard Design 


Third Year 


Advanced 
Jacquard Design 


Advanced 

Calculations 

and 

Fabric Analysis 


Advanced 

Weave Formation 

and 

Fabric Structure 



Course G 



This course is arranged for those who desire to specialize in the study of 
chemistry and dyeing, both in theory and practice. 





MONDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


FRIDAY 


First Year 


Chemical 
Laboratory 


Chemical 
Laboratory 


Chemistry 
Lecture 


Second Year 


Lecture 

Elementary Dyeing 

(8-9 P.M.) 


Dye 
Laboratory 


Dye 
Laboratory 


Third Year 


Lecture 

Advanced Dyeing 

(8-9 P.M.) 


Dye 

Laboratory 


Dye 

Laboratory 



Course H 




EVENING CLASSES 

Subjects of Study and Fees 

The following fce-s are for individual studies. The fee 
for the regular courses, as outlined on pages 94 to 97, is 
$18.00 to $25.00 ( for the term of six months) according to 
the character of the suhjects included. 

WEAVE FORMATION 

Divided into l'.lem<,'ntar_\-. Intermediate and Advanced, 
each di\'ision re(]uiring one year. For details, see pages 

44, 5(1 and ti7 . Vvv for this suhject two hours per week 
for the term, $8.00. 

ELEMENTARY WARP PREPARATION AND WEAVING 

Re([uiring one year. h^or details, see page 47. Fee 
for this suhject, two hours i)er week for the term, $8.00. 

ELEMENTARY, INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED 
CALCULATIONS AND FABRIC ANALYSIS 

l^ach division re([uiring one }ear. For details, see pages 

45, 51 and 58. Tw(j hours per week for tlu' term, $8.00. 

THE STUDY OF THE POWER LOOM 
(Special Loom Fixing Class) 

This course covers a ])eriod of one term or year, and is 
carried on hy means of Lectures and practical Deiuonstra- 
tions. The suhjects considered are partlv covered by the 
following : 

The Power Loom. — Tlu' jjrincipk's goveniin!? its parts. — Rela- 
tion and timing of tlu' parts. — The various shc-dding mechanism, 
cam motion, cam and scroll motion, dobby motion. — ( )peii and closed 
shed looms, and the advantages of each. — The various picking 
motions, the alternating pick, the pick and i)ick, cam and cone, sliding 
pick motion. — Shuttle hux motions, raise and dnip liox, skip bo.x, 
circular box, boxes controlled by cams, by a chain and by the 
Jac(juard. — Rules and calculatioris for change gears for the various 
take-up motions. — Ascertaining desired speed of shafting and size 
of ]>ulley for given s])eed of loom. — Timing and setting of the box 
m(_)tions of the Knowles, Crompton, WOod, l'"url)ush, Schaum & 
Uhlingcr, Stafford and Wliitin looms. — Knock-off uKjtions. — b^ast 
and loose reeds. — Harness and box chain building and care of stock. 
— Multiplier fiox chain building. — The jaccpuird machme and its 
many forms of use. — .Mounting and adjusting of single-lift, double- 
lift and special Jacquards. 

97 



EVENING CLASSES 



Fee for this eourse, two hours per week for the term 
(six moiUlis), $10.00. 

COTTON YARN MANUFACTURE 

Two years are reqnirefh First Year. — For details, see 
page 49. Second year. — AcK'anced work, particularly with 
regards to pickers, conil)ing, spinning, twisting, and the 
self-acting nude. Vt-t- for this suhject, two hours per week, 
for term, $8.00. 

WOOL YARN MANUFACTURE 

First year. — Instruction given on all processes through 
carding. Second year. — Spinning, twisting, and self-acting 
mule. 

Two \ears are required. For details, see page 53. Fee 
for this suhject, two hoin-s per week, for the term, $8.00. 

WORSTED YARN MANUFACTURE 

One \ear is re(pured. For details see jiage 54. Fee 
for this suhject, t\\<) hours ])er week, for the term, $8.00. 

PLAIN HOSIERY KNITTING 

This Course, covering a period ot two \'ears, has heen 
[)lanned with the aim of gi\ing the student not only a general 
knowledge of the ]irinci])les and construction of knitted 
fa])rics, hut a familiarit\- with the ])ractical workings of 
many of the l)est makes of Knitting Machines, Riblx'rs and 
Loopers. 

A brief outline of the work f(_)llo\vs : ^'arn calculations. — 
(Irading' yarns witli re.s^arcl to size. — Consi(krin,s4' tht- various systems 
in their relation to one another. — The relation of count, weight and 
length of different threads. — TIil' principles and construction of the 
circular rilib top knitting machines, and the knitting of the different 
classes of tops, with all kinds of the best welts for half hose, wrist 
and ankle cuffs. I'laiting of all kinds — silk, cotton, etc.; making of 
legs for children's rihbed stockings; also the principle and con- 
struction of seamless hosier}' knitting machines ; the assembling, 
setting and adjusting of all ])arts of the different well-known types 
employed in making infants', l)oys', and misses' stockings, men's 
half hose, ladies' stockings, including the different styles of rein- 
forcing, high splice, double sole, reinforced lieel and toe, plaiting of 
the different colors, etc. 

Fee for this suhject, two hcjurs per week, for the 
term, $8.00. 

99 



EVENING CLASSES 



CHEMISTRY AND DYEING 

One vcar is rc'(|uii\'(l for chemistry atul two years for 
dveiii"'. 

* ELEMENTARY CHEMISTRY 

L"onsistin,!4 df iiractical lalmratory experiments and lectures. 

Introductory iilras mi ^ciiiitilic methods of study and experimentation. — 
Simple maniiHiIatinns in the use and handling of aiijiaratus. — Chemical action. — 
Study of hydrogen and oxygen. — .\cids, bases and salts. — Chemical notation, 
symbols, fornuilas and e(|uations. — .Study of typical compounds, with charac- 
teristic exiierimeuts illustrati\i' uf the same. — Chemical kivvs and calculations. 
— Solutions of ]n-ol)lems. l'i-ep;iration and examination of the chief elements 
and their important conipoumls by means of laboratory experiments. 

Fee for tliis subject, six hours per week for the term, $18.00. 
See "Deposits," pa.ue 100. 

ELEMENTARY DYEING 

Covering the a])plicati(.in of the various c(_il<ir> ti> wool, cotton 
and silk. 

Scouring anil (ireiiaration of loose wool, yarn and cloth. — Uleaching. — 
.\liplication of tile acid colors.— The basic colors. — The mordant colors. — The 
natural dyes. — Compounding shades. 

Scouring and bleacliing of cotton. — Methods of applying substantive 
C(jlors. — I)eveloped colors. Basic colors. — .\Iizarine and natural colors. — Methods 
of mordanting and lixing. Com|ionnding of shailes. 

ADVANCED DYEING 

Color mixing and matching. — After-treated cob.irs. — -Mineral colors. — Natural 
dyes. — Aniline black. — Naphthol colors. — Silk dyeing. — Ibiion dyeing. — Ilalf-silk 
dyeing. — Gloria dyeing. — Indigo and other vat dyes. — Sulphur cohjrs. — De- 
veloped colors. — Resist dyeing. — Comparative money-value of dye stufls. 

In connection with lahoratorv work in experimental 
dyeing, a course of lectures is given once a week, covering 
the chemical and physical technology of the fil)res, scouring 
and hleaching, methods and theory of dyeing, and special 
lectures on soajjs, mercerizing, etc. ; the lecture course 
covers a period of two \-ears. 

Fee for each year of the dyeing course, six hours per 
week, $18.00. See "Deposits." page 106. 

LECTURE COURSES IN DYEING 

Students may take the course of lectures in elementary 
or advanced dyeing, without the supplementary laboratory 
work. The course consists of twenty-four lectures of one 
hour each, and no certificate is given. 

The fee for the course of lectures in either elementary 
or advanced d_\'eing is $8.00. 

101 



EVENING CLASSES 



Courses in Chemistry 



FIRST YEAR-ELEMENTARY CHEMISTRY 

Introductory ideas on scientific methods of study and experimentation. — - 
Simple manipulations in the use and handling of apparatus. — Chemical action. — ■ 
Study of hydrogen and oxygen. — Acids, bases and salts. — Chemical notation, 
symbols, formulas and equations. — Study of typical compounds, with charac- 
teristic experiments illustrative of the same. — Chemical laws and calculations. — 
Solution of problems. — Preparation and examination of the chief elements and 
their important compounds by means of laboratory experiments. 

This course is elementar}', and is carried on by means of lectures 
and recitations, coupled with considerable laboratory work in experi- 
mentation on the properties and preparation of the chemical elements 
and their compounds. 

The tuition fee for this subject is $18.00 for the term of 6 hours 
per week. See "Deposits," page 106. 

SECOND YEAR-OUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

The analytical classification of the metals. — Characteristic tests for the 
different elements. — Detection of bases and acids in their compounds. — Solving 
of analytical problems. — Writing of reactions. 

This course is arranged with the view of making the student 
thoroughly familiar with the characteristic reactions whereby the 
different chemical elements may be recognized and distinguished 
from one another in their numerous combinations. The work is car- 
ried on largely by experiments, and the student is required to 
solve problems given to him for analysis. He is taught how to test 
materials with regard to purity and the methods of detecting adul- 
terations in the various commercial products with which he is apt 
to come in contact. 

The tuition fee for this subject is $18.00 for the term of 6 hours 
per week. See "Deposits," page 106. 

THIRD YEAR-QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

General procedure in analytical methods; sources of error and their pre- 
vention. — Preliminary manipulation; use of analytical balances. — Preparation of 
pure salts. — Methods of precipitation and treatment of precipitates.^ — Typical 
gravimetric analyses of the metals. — Analyses of compounds containing several 
metals. — Gravimetric estimation of the acid radicals. — Principles of electrolytic 
analysis. 

General principles of volumetric procedure. — Classification of volumetric 
methods. — Use and calibration of graduated apparatus. — Preparation of normal 
and standard solutions. — Use and limitations of indicators. — Alkalimetry and 
acidimetry; typical analyses of acids and alkalies. — Volumetric methods by oxi- 
dation and reduction. — \'olumetric methods of precipitation. — Exercises on com- 
mercial products. 

102 



EVENING CLASSES 



In this course the student learns, by means of actual demonstra- 
tion, the methods of determinin.i; quantitati\el_\' the composition of 
various chemical compounds. Me is well drilled in the use of the 
balance, and is tau,L;ht habits of precision, accuracy of observation 
and delicacy of manipulation, so necessary for success in chemical 
analysis. The oI)jects employed for the analyses, as far as possible, 
are selected from commercial products, and are those best adapted 
to the immediate needs of the individual student. 

The tuition fee for this subject is $25.(10 for the term of 6 hours 
per vi^eek. See "Deposits," page 106. 



FOURTH YEAR-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

(General properties of the compounds of carI)oii. — ("lassilication of organic 
compounds. — The aliidiatic series; the hydrocarbons; hahjgen derivatives; 
alcohols; ethers; aldehydes; ketones; the fatty acids and their derivatives. — 
Study of the esters; sulphur eonipiiunds; amines and cyanogen compounds. — 
The unsaturated hydrocarbons and their derivatives. — The carbohydrates, and 
dibasic acids. — Nitrogenous ami proteiil substances. — Tlie aromatic compounds; 
benzene and its homologues. — The aromatic nitro and amido compounds; diazo 
and azo compounds. — The aromatic acids and their derivatives. — Triphenyl- 
methane derivatives. — Naphthalene and its compounds. — .\nthracene and its 
compounds. — Heterocyclic compounds. 

This course is elementary in character and is adajited to the 
needs of the sttident who desires the essential.s of the subject. The 
lectures are supplemented by laboratory work which follows a 
syllabus of exiieriments. 

This course will not be given unless there is a sufficient number 
of api)licants to form a class. 

The tuition fee for this subject is $25.00 for the term of 6 hours 
per week. See "Deposits," page 106. 

DESIGN COLORING 

One year is rc'(|ttirc'd. The parlictilar something" which 
makes a textile fahric attractive. A point of utmost 
importance to every one who heli)s to manufacture or market 
the product of the milL Without color, good patterns 
heconif flat and possess no charm; with good color, inferior 
patterns become leaders. 

Theories are treated as applied t(j the textile fabric. 
Practical worl^ with i)igments showing the action of colors 
on each other, and the modification due to mixtures of raw 
materials and yarns, furnish much of the woid< in this 
subject. 

103 



EVENING CLASSES 



Matching of colors in yarns and fabrics, training the 
eye to detect chfferences in tone and quahty of color. Fab- 
rics are studied with reference to the etTect of weave and 
textures on color combinations. 

Colored sketches for dress goods, shirtings, Jacquard 
fabrics, carpets and rugs are made, showing the application 
of the various principles laid down. 

Fee for this subject, two hours per week for the term, 
$8.00. 

Supplemental work of advanced nature may be followed 
in the making of the finished designs for rugs, carpets, 
upholstery and plain fabrics. 

JACQUARD DESIGN 

Elementary — Includes instruction in the use of the 
Jacquard ]\Iachine to control the warp, its construction and 
method of operation, arranging the various parts of the 
harness to produce fancv eft'ects, threading of the comber- 
board for the main forms of tie-ups, as well as arranging 
of design on ])oint paper, and card cutting directions to 
operate the Jacquard. 

Work in this course includes calculations to produce 
fabrics on Jacquard looms with reference to both the yarns, 
textures, etc., and the size of machines necessary, how the 
different textures are laid out on point paper, and the 
weights of materials necessary to produce same in cloth. 

One year is required, two hours per week. 

Advanced — The advanced work is intended for those 
who are already familiar with the elementary work, through 
outside experience or owing to having taken it in the School, 
and whose ambition is to fit themselves for positions in 
which greater skill is demanded. One year is required, 
which is devoted to higher Jacquard design and card 
stamping. Fee for these subjects, two hours per week for 
the term, $8.00. 
104 



EVENING CLASSES 

SPECIAL JACOUARD DESIGN 

This course has l)cen arranged for the benefit of those 
students who desire to speciahze in rugs, ingrain, tapestry, 
brussels and similar floor coverings, as well as other lines 
of Jacquard work. 

SPECIAL SILK 

Requiring an attendance of one year. — This course 
has been arrangefl for the benefit of those students who are 
emi)loyed in the silk industry during the day, and who wish 
to become more familiar with the construction, analysis and 
calculation of silk fabrics. The studies pursued include 
such subjects as may be found under Analysis, etc., on pages 
71 and 71. Fee for this sul)ject, two hours per week for the 
term, $8.00. 

RAW MATERIALS OF THE WOOL INDUSTRIES 

Instruction in this subject is given l)y means of lectures, 
which occur weeklv, on Mondav evenings. The year's work 
is divided into two ])ortions, designated as elementary and 
advanced, and includes the discussion of such topics as may 
be found under "Raw Materials, etc.," on page 53. Fee for 
this subject, two hours per week for the term, $8.00. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Ai^plicants for admission to any of the evening classes 
should be at least 17 years of age, and prepared to satisfy 
the Director or Flead of the Department that they will profit 
by attendance at any of these classes to which they may be 
admitted. 

TUITION FEES 

The Tuition Fees vary from $18.00 to $25.00 for the 
courses outlined on ])ages 94 to 96 for the year or term. 
The fees for individual studies are given under the differ- 
ent subjects on pages 94 to 107. All fees are payable in 
advance. See page 27. 

105 



EVENING CLASSES 



DEPOSITS 

Students in the Evening Course in Dyeing, Elementary 
Chemistry and in Qualitative Analysis make a deposit of 
$8.00 to cover breakage, laboratory locker rental ($1.00), 
and laboratory charges. Students in Quantitative Analysis 
and Organic Chemistry make a deposit of $10.00. After 
deducting such charges, the balance is returned at the close 
of the school session. 

LOCKER DEPOSITS 

Students of the Regular Textile Evening School make 
a deposit of $1.00 when they are supplied with a locker. 
Fifty cents of this amount is refunded, provided the key is 
returned within thirty days after the close of the school year. 

HOURS OF STUDY 

The Evening Classes are in session from 7.30 until 9.30 
on Alonday, Wednesday and Friday evenings. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations are held at the close of year or term in 
all subjects taken in the Regular Courses. 

CERTIFICATES 

Two grades of certificates are awarded, as follows : A 
Full Course Certificate to those students who have com- 
pleted three years of study in either of the following 
courses : A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H, in a satisfactory 
manner. Among the requirements are a complete orderly 
record of the work as given by the instructor; an attendance 
of at least 75 per cent, of the time the classes are in session ; 
and the passing of the final examinations. A Partial Course 
Certificate to students who have completed in a satisfactory 
manner, including the final examinations, the following 
special studies : 
106 



EVENING CLASSES 



Weave Fornialioii three years 

Jaccjuard I)esi,<i[n two years 

Fabric Analysis and Calonlation three years 

Cotton Yarn Ahuint'acture one year 

Wool Yarn ^lannfactnre two years 

Worsted ^^'lrn Alannfactnre one year 

Silk Fabric Analysis one year 

Raw Materials of the Wool Indnslrics. .one vear 

MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 

A merit scholarship is awarded to the stndent attaining 
the highest rating for the year's work, inclnding the final 
examinations in both the first and second year Regular 
Textile Course. 

SUPPLIES 

Students nuist prox'ide themselves with the necessarv 
note books, designing ])ai)er, paints, brushes, and other 
materials, as indicated bv the Lecturers and Instructors in 
the respective classes. These materials are for sale in the 
School at less than retail prices. 



^S^ 




107 



Donations 



To the Institution During the Year 

CROMPTON & KXcnVLES LOCni WORKS, Worcester, Mass.— Donation 

of $138.50 on price of Silk Loom purchased. 
MR. THOIMAS SKELTOX HARRISON, Philadelphia, Pa —Donation of 

$55.00 for purchase of two Cedar Tanks for dye-house. 
MR. ERNEST F. GREEFF, President Griffon Company, New York, N. Y.— 

Check for $25.00 to be used for School purposes. 
SAUOUOIT SILK MFG. CO., Philadelphia. Pa.— 15 lbs. Raw Silk; 6 lbs. Japan 

Tram Silk. 
MOSS ROSE MFG. CO., Philadelphia, Pa.— Various Colors of Artificial 

Silks. 
ABERFOYLE MFG. CO., Chester, Pa.— 29 lbs. Mercerized Yarn. 
JACOB MILLER, SONS & CO., Philadelphia, Pa.— About 50 lbs. of 

various colors and sizes of Cotton Yarns. 
THE ERBEN-H.\RDING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa.— Various colored 

Yarns in skeins and on bobbins. 
MAIN BELTING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa.— 42 ft. of 4-ply Anaconda 

Belting. 
STEEL HEDDLE :\1FG. CO., Philadelphia, Pa.— 30 Heddle Frames and 2,000 

Heddles. 
AMERICAN TEXTILE BANDING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa.— 20 lbs. 

Spinning Tape. 
R. SERGESON & CO., Philadelphia, Pa.— 10 Hand Loom Shuttles. 
JOHN ROYLE & SONS, Paterson, N. J.— Parts for Card Cutter. 
HELLWIG SILK DYEING COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa.— Dyeing 2i lbs. 

of Silk Yarn. 
BORNE, SCRYMSER COMPANY, New York, N. Y.—yi barrel of Wool 

Oil. 
DOBBINS SOAP MFG. CO., Philadelphia, Pa.— 100 lbs. Palm Oil Soap. 
SWIFT & CO., Philadelphia, Pa.— Type Samples of Pulled Wools. 
"DAILY NEWS RECORD," New York, N. Y.— Advertising School during 

summer 1916 in "Daily News Record." 
E. F. DREW & CO., INC., Philadelphia, Pa.— 5 gallons Turkey Red Oil. 
GENERAL CHE.MICAL COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa.— Year's Supply of 

Sulphuric and Muriatic Acids. 
ROESSLER & HASSLACHER CHEMICAL CO., New York, N. Y.— 5 lbs. 

Sodium Perborate. 
AMERICAN DYEWOOD CO., Chester, Pa.— Collection of Dyewoods and 

Extracts for Exhibition Purposes, also year's supply of Dyewood 

Extracts. 
THE J. B. FORD CO., W^vandotte, Mich.— 2 barrels Soda Ash, 1 barrel 

Concentrated Soda i\sh, 1 barrel Wyandotte Soda Ash. 

108 



Courtesies Extended 

Schaum & L'hliiigcr, Philadelphia, Pa. — Erben-Harding Co., 
Philadidphia, Pa.~Al)crf(iylc Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa.— Firth & Foster 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. — J. K. Foster & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. — 
"Fibre and Fabrie," Boston, ]\[ass. — "Textile-World Journal," Xew 
York, X'. Y. — "American Silk Journal," Xew York. X. Y. — "Daily 
X'ews Record," Xew \"(irk, X. ^^ — "Textile ]\lanufacturer," Char- 
lotte, X'. I".— "-Men's Wear," Xew York, X. Y.— "d'extile Colorist," 
Philadelphia, Pa. — "Cotton," Atlanta. Ga. — Saco-Lowell Shoi)s, 
Lowell, Mass.— Thomas Halton's Sons. Philadelphia, Pa.— Philadel- 
phia Textile Machinery Co., Philadelphia, h'a. — John Koyle & Sons, 
Paterson, X. J. — Crompton & Knowles Loom Works, Worcester, 
Mass. — Sauquoit Silk Mfg. Co., Philadel])hia, Pa. — American Card 
Clothing I'o., I'hdadelphia, Pa.— Chas. I'.ond Co., Philadelphia, Pa.— 
American Moistening Co., Boston, Mass. — John M. Harris & Co., 
Xew York, X. Y.— P. H. Hood Co., Philadelphia, Pa.— H. W. But- 
terworlh t\: Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa. — Cold Spring Bleaching and 
h'inishing Works, Yardley. Pa. — Jacob Miller, Sons & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. — Concordia Silk Co., Pliiladeliihia, I'a. — E. L. Mansure Co., 
Philadelphia, ?'a. — Standard Machine t. o., Philadelphia, Pa. — Stead & 
Miller Co., Philadelphia, Pa.— The Moss Rose Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



Influence of the School 

A SUMMARIZED ESTIMATE OE THE WORK OE THE SCHOOL 

Some idea of the influence of the School in this mighty in<lustry 
ma}' be gleaned from the following: 

Establishments in which students have become owners or part- 
ners : Capitalization, $7, OOO. (''(>() ; Broad Looms, 2,144: Xarrow Looms, 
5,5o5 ; Xarrow h"al)ric Looms. 176. 

Establishments in which students have become managers or 
superintendents : Capitalization, $16,000,000 ; Looms operated, 18,564, 
to which must be added the necessary spinning, dyeing, and finishing 
labor and machinery. 

Estal:)lishments in which students have become designers : Capi- 
talization, $5,500.0110: Looms operated, 1,1000. 

A considerable number of students have engaged in the market- 
ing of goods, having become commission men, manufacturers' agents, 
salesmen and stylers of falirics. A like numlier have l)ecome man- 
agers, chemists and foremen dyers in establishments representing a 
capitalization of $5,000,000. 

109 



A Partial List of Former Students of the 
School with their Occupations 



For a corresponding list of former students of the School of Applied Art, 
see the circular of that School 



(Pupils are requested to assist the Director in correcting the List.) 
ABERLE, li. C, Firm of H. C. Aberle & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
ACKERMAN, GILBERT E., with Ackerman & Foster, New York, N. Y. 
AICIIELMANN, FRED. J., with The Schwarzenbach-Huber Co., Altoona, Pa. 
ALGEO, BRADLEY C, Assistant Director, Philadelphia Textile School. 
ALLEN, LEE R., with John Wanamaker, Philadelphia, Pa. 
ALTHOEN, IIARRY, with Flamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Canada. 
ALTHOUSE, C. SCOTT, President, Neversink Dyeing Co., Reading, Pa. 
ANDREAE, FRANK W., President and Supt., Yale Woolen Mills. Yale, Mich. 
ANDREAE, RUDOLPH E., with Yale Woolen Mills, Yale, Mich. 
APELDORN, ERNEST F., Jr., of Fulmer & Apeldorn, Philadelphia, Pa. 
ARCHER, B. KENDALL, with Collins & Aikman Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
ARNOLD, W. W., Jr., Supt.. Manchester Cotton Mills, Manchester, C,a. 
ASHE, EDWARD J., with Standard Knitting Mills, Knoxville, Tenn. 
ASPDEN, NEWTON J., of Bennett & Aspden, Philadelphia, Pa. 
AUNGST, J. T., Dyer, with R. Wolfenden & Sons, Attleboro, Mass. 

BAENY, ROBERT M., Superintendent, Bengal Silk Mills, Central Falls, R. 1. 

BAKER, JOEL R., with W. E. Tillotson Mfg. Co., Pittsfield, Mass. 

BALDWIN, ABRAHAM R., Export and Commission Merchant. Chicago, 111. 

BARNET. HENRY B., Manufacturer of Shoddies, Albany, N. Y. 

BARTELT, MORRIS W., Designer, Wm. Ayres & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BATHGATE, GEORGE H., Asst. Supt., Niantic Mfg. Co., East Lyme, Conn. 

BATTEY, DONALD E., Firm of Battey. Trull & Co., New York, N. Y. 

BATTEY, W. EARL, Firm of P.attey, Trull .\: Co.. New York, N. Y. 

BAXTER, C. CARROLL, Salesman, with Arthur J. Fleming (Cotton Yarns), 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

BEHM, ALBERT, Head Dyer, with Waterloo Woolen Mfg. Co., Waterloo. 
N. Y. 

BELL, HAROLD C, with Amos S. Bell & Co., New York, N. Y. 

BENEDICT, HENRY IL, Manager, ]Mark D. Ring's Son & Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

BENNETT, CIIAS. R., with American Cotton and Wool Reporter, Boston, Mass. 

BENNINGHOFEN, PAUL, with .Miami Woolen Mills, Hamilton, Ohio. 

BENTON, S. IRVING, Salesman, with The I'.ayer Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BERRY, FRANK, Designer and Assistant Superintendent, Paul Whitin Mfg. 
Co., Northbridge, Mass. 

BERTOLET, ELMER C, Instructor Dyeing, Philadelphia Textile School. 

BICKHAM, S. A., Paymaster, Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co., Chester, Pa. 

110 



BINGER, WALTER D., Soufluiu Rep. of Peierls, Rubier & Co., New York, 
N. V. 

BINZ, FERDINAND, Manufaeturer of Carpets, Phila.leli.hia, Pa. 

BISHOP, CHAUNCEY R., Mgr., Salem Woolen Mills Store, Salem, Oregon. 

BISHOP, CLARENCE M., firm of Pendleton Woolen Mill, Pendleton, Oregon. 

BISHOP, ROY T., firm of Pendleton Woolen Mill, Pendleton, Oregon. 

BLACK, WALTER C, with Jos. Rlaek & Sons, York, Pa. 

BLACKBURN, FREDERICK, with Julius A Gebauer, Frankford, Phila., Pa. 

BLACKWOOD, WILLIAM, Supt., I'em Rock Woolen Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BLUN, F. MELVILLE, with R. A. Tuttle Co., New York, N. Y. 

BOND, CHARLES, President of Chas. Bond Co., Mill Supplies, Phila., Pa. 

I'.nN'jl, JIlllX, Manufacturing Clothier, Denver, Colo. 

l:i).\|), W. !•:., Designer, (ilendale Elastic Fabrics Co., Easthampton, Mass. 

BOOTH, 1 LARRY, with American \'isc..se Co., Marcus Hook, Pa. 

I'.ooril, J.VMES, Salesman, Smith & Furbush Machine Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOSETTI, CHARLES P., Supt., Concordia Silk Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOSWORTIT, H. H., President Delaine Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOYLE, JAMES J., with A. Boyle & Bro., Philadelphia, Pa. 

I!R.\I>^', JOHN T., Asst. Supt. and Designer, Waucantuck Mills, Uxbridge, 
Mass. 

BREADY, E. K., Proprietor, C.irard Worsted Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BREW^STER, ELDON F., Southern Agent of Badische Co., College Park, Ga. 

BREWSTER, FREDERICK S., Assistant Designer, with American Mills Co., 
Rcickville, Conn. 

RRIDCiE, SAMUEL, Foreman, with Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn. 

BKIDGER, J. L., Gen. Mgr., Bladenboro Cotton Mills, Bladenboro, N. C. 

BRIGGS, EVERETT A., Dyer, with Farr Alpaca Co., Holyoke, Mass. 

BRIGGS, LE ROY, Head Dyer, Hardwick & Magee Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROADHEAD, IRVING IT., Supt., Empire Worsted Mills, Jamestown, N. Y. 

BRODl'.ECK, II. C, Jr., with II. C. Brodbeck, Sr., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

BROOKE, II. CARROLL, firm of Nicetown Dye Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROOKE, ROBERT E., Designer, with Goodman V.ms. & Ilinlein, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

BROOM, ARNOTT R., chemist, with Jos. R. Foster &• Sou, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROOM, I-IARRY, Manager, Kalle & Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROUGITTON, IT. R., Designer, Standish Worsted Co., Plymouth, Mass. 

BROWN, TIIOS. J., Jr., with Geo. Brown's Sons, Mt. Joy. Pa. 

BROWN, A. MAURICE, with George I'.rown Sons, Lenni, Pa. 

BROWN, E. IL, Yarn Manufacturer, with Wilson 11. Brown & Bro., German- 
town, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROWN, FREDERICK, Supt., Mansfield Elastic Web Co., Mansfield, Ohio. 

BROWN, HARRY G., with Edward S. Hyde Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BROWN, J. W., President, Cowpens Mfg. Co., Cowpens, S. C. 

BROWN, S. W., Superintendent, with Wm. W. Brown, Worcester, Mass. 

BROWN, WILLIAM P., with FoUmer, Clogg & Co., Lancaster, Pa. 

BRUMBACH, C. A., with A. J. Brumbach, Reading, Pa. 

BRUNNER, FRANCIS A., Manufacturer, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BUCK, LEON IT., City Dye Works, Los Angeles, Cal. 

BURT, JOHN, formerly of Southwark Mills Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

BUTTERWORTH, GEORGE, Public Warp Beamer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

CADY, ALANSON, Designer, Iloo.sac Cotton Mills, No. Adams, Mass. 
CAMERON, JAMES B., Yarn Salesman, with Cann.m ALUs, Philadelphia, Pa. 
CAMPBELL, ARCHIBALD, Superintendent, with Hardwick & Magee Co., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
CAMPBELL, JOHN J., Dyer and Finisher Worsted Goods, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ill 



CAMPBELL, J. W., firm of Colman, Mackey & Campbell, New York, X. Y. 
CARSON, ROBERT J., of Robert Carson & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GARY, ERNEST P., Stipt., Empire Mfg. Co., Lockport, N. Y. 
CASWELL, C. A., Manufacturer of Woolen Goods, Bloomsburg, Pa. 
CHADWIGK, BERTRAM, Instructor, School of Industrial Art, Phila., Pa. 
CHALK, WILLIAM G., Superintendent, Gothic Wilton Rug and Carpet Co., 

Gloucester, N. J. 
CHANALIS, BENJAMIN, Buyer and Manager, Montgomery Ward & Co., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CHAPPATTE, JOS E., Manager. E. L. Mansure Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
CHEW, D. S. B., Cotton Goods Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
CHIPMAN, W. EVANS, Secretary and Treasurer, Chipman Knitting Mills, 

Easton, Pa. 
CHRIST, HERBERT, of Christ Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
CHURCH, CHARLES W., with Monument Mills, Housatonic, Mass. 
CLAASEN, ARTHUR C, with E. F. Drew & Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 
CLARK, ARTHUR P., with Ostrander & Co., New York, N. Y. 
CLARK, J. C. F., Assistant Secretary and Treasurer, and Superintendent of 

Enterprise Cotton Mills, Enterprise, Ala. 
CLARK, JAMES H., President, Waverly Mills, Frankford, Phila., Pa. 
CLARK, JOHN, Treasurer, Waverly Mills, Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
CLARK, JOHN W., Superintendent, Erwin Bleaching and Finishing Plant, 

W. Durham, N. C. 
CLARK, RUFUS W.. Jr., Mgr.. T. H. Eaton & Son, Detroit, Mich. 
CLAYPOOLE, J A., Overseer, Peter Graff & Co., Worthington, Pa. 
CLAYPOOLE, J. NORMAN, with Peter Graff & Co., Worthington, Pa. 
CLEVELAND, HENRY AT, Asst. Treas., Tucapau Mills, Tucapau, S. C. 
CLIFTON, ALBERT T., President, Clifton Mfg. Co., Waco, Texas. 
CLOLTTIER, PAUL J., with Lewiston Bleachery and Dye Works, Lewiston, Me. 
COCKROFT, JAMES H., Salesman, Cassella Color Co., Boston, Mass. 
COE, HERBERT G., Asst. Supt., Brookside Mills, Knoxville, Tenn. 
COIRA, CHARLES F., with Concordia Silk Mills, Philadelphia. Pa. 
COLLINGWOOD, JOSEPH, Dyer, with Farr Alpaca Co., Flolyoke, Mass. 
COLSON, SHERIDAN, with Catlin & Co., New York, N. Y. 
CONE, CLARENCE N., Vice-President, Minneola Mfg. Co., Gibsonville, N. C. 
CONNELL, ROBERT S., Designer, Shelbourne Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 
CONNELLY, JOHN, with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 
COOPER, WARREN F., with American Viscose Co., Marcus Flook, Pa. 
CORCORAN, THOS. M., Shackamaxon Worsted Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
COTSHOTT. FRED., Assistant Supt., with J. Cotshott, Philadelphia, Pa. 
COUPE, ALBERT, Asst. Supt., with Portland Woolen Mills, St. Johns, Ore. 
COX, RICH.:\RD S., Professor in charge of Jacquard Design and Color Work, 

Philadelphia Textile School. 
CRABTREE, JOHN A., firm of Wm. Crabtree & Sons, Montgomery, N. Y. 
CRAWFORD, DONALD D. P., Salesman, with Warner J. Steel, Bristol, Pa. 
CROWTHER, JOHN, firm of Shannock Xarrow Fabric Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
CROZER, GEO. K., Jr., with J. P. Crozer's Sons, Upland, Pa. 
CRUMP, WALTER M., Supt., Peck Mfg. Co., ^^•arrentown, N. C. 
CULLIS, JOHN R., with Soo Woolen Mills, Ste. Sault Marie, Mich. 
CUMMINGS, PARKER, Salesman, with Geiger & Spring, New York, N. Y. 

DAMON, WM. C, Manager, Waterloo Woolen Mills, Waterloo, N. Y. 
DANA, PHILIP, Pres. and Treas., Dana Warp Mills, Westbrook, Me. 
DANCY, HIBBERT H., with R. R. Dancy & Co., Houston, Texas. 
DANNERTH, FREDERIC, Jr., Consulting Chemist, Passaic, N. J. 

112 



DAVEY, EDWARD G., Superintendent Yarn Mill, McCIeary, Wallin & Grouse, 

Amsterdam, N. Y 
DAVIDSON, H. ()., Su]it., Eagle and Plmcnix Mills, Cnlumbus. Ga. 
DAVIDSON, LOR IX, with Jac(,li S. Bcrnlieinur ,V Bro., New York, N. Y. 
DAVIS, EDWARD II.. with Bureau of Standards, Washington, 1 ). C. 
DAVIS, SAM r I'd. 11., Styler, with (daley & Lord Gommission Go., New 

York, N. Y. 
DAVISON, ALEX YOl'NG, Manager, F. E. Atteaux & Go., Boston, Mass. 
DAWSON, ROBERd" L., Examining Dept., Ameriean Woolen Go., New York, 

X. ^'. 
DEAX, MILTON n.. Superintendent, Pei.perel! Mfg. Go., Eiddeford, Me. 
DEMPSTER, ROBERT 1'.., witli Standar.l Knitting Mills, Knoxville, Tenn. 
DENKHAUS, F. G., witli N'erlenden Brns., Ine., Darby, Pa. 
DENNY, GEORGE A., of the Diamond Textile Machine Wnrks, Phila., Pa. 
DIETZ, JO UN. Garpet Designer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

DILLlXGilAM, ( 1L\S. K., with II. W. Johns-Manville Go., Manville, N. J. 
DILLON, L. M.. Supt., Tames J. Regan Mfg. Co.. Roekville, G<.nn. 
DIMENT, JAMES S., with Utica Steam and iMohawk \'alley Gotton Mills, 

Utica, N. Y. 
DOOLEY, TIIOS. P., Proprietor Hosiery Mill, Johnson Gity, Tenn. 
DOSSER, A. T., Jr., with Aberfoyle Mfg. Go., Ghester, Pa. 
DUHRING, EDWIX L., with Reading Ghemical Mfg. Go., Reading, Pa. 
DUKE, LAW REX (d-:, with Gommonwealth Gotton Mills, Durham, N. C. 
DLTNMORE, W. T., Jr., Overseer. Utica Knitting Go., Utica, N. Y. 
DUNN, ER\'IN S., Treas., Dunn Worsted Go., Woonsocket, R. I. 
DUVAL, GEO. M., Supt., Sec. and Treas., Social Circle Gotton Mills, Social 

Gircle, Ga. 

EAMES, JOHN GAPEN, Exporter, New York, N. Y. 

EASTON, ROBERT B., Secretary, Waypoyset Mfg. Go., Gentral Falls, R. I. 

EASTOP, RAYMOND W., Supt., Ansonia O. & G. Go., Ansonia, Gonn. 

EATON, ROBERT K., Asst. to Agent, Gabnt Mfg. Go., Brunswick, Me. 

EDDY, H. W., Jr., wdth Gharlotte Supply Go.. ( harlotte, N. G, 

EDDY, LOUIS LL, Dyestuff Broker, Westerly, R. I. 

EICK, EMIL F., Jr., Supt., Hadley Mills, South Iladley Falls, Mass. 

FILERS, A. J., with Orr I'elt and Blanket Go., Piqua, Ohio. 

EINSTEIN, MORIHS G., Designer, with Peace Dale Mfg. Go., Peace Dale, 

R. I. 
EISE:\rAN, ALFRED S., wdth Sanuiel Eiseman &■ Go., New York, N. Y 
EISNER, IT. RAYMONIX firm of Sigmund Eisner Go., Red Bank, N. J. 
EMERSON, J. E., Supt., Niagara Textile Go., Loekport, N. Y. 

FALK, O. N., of O. N Falk & Go., Philadelphia, Pa. 

FELTON, J. IT., with X'alkone Dyeing & Finishing Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

FIEBIGER, JOHN II.. with Wm. J. Herrmann & Son, New York, N. Y. 

FINGIvEL, GoX> I:RS B., with J. IT. Lane & Go., New York, N. Y. 

FINTvELIdOR, LE0N.\RD S., Finkelhor Bros., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FIRTH, EDWARD, Head Dyer, Firth & Foster Go., Philadelphia, Pa. 

FIRTIT, IRVING A., with Firth & Foster Go., Philadelphia, Pa. 

FISS, GEORGE W., Jr., with Ghipman Knitting Mills, Easton, Pa. 

FITGir. PERt Y F., Man. Director, Narrow Fabric Weaving and Dyeing, Ltd., 

Gait, ( )ntario, Ganaila. 
FITE, J. ELLSWORTH, Jr., iirm of Goh.nial Mfg. Go., Philadelphia, Pa. 
FLEISHER, IIORAGE T., Hosiery Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FLETSIIER, WILLIS, t^rm of Shelbourne Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

113 



FORD, WILLIAM R., with W. & R. Ford Mfg. Co., Fkd., Philadelphia, Pa. 
FORSYTH, THOMAS, firm of Forsyth Dyeing Co., New Haven, Conn. 
FOSTER, ARTHUR, with Firth & Foster Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
FOSTER, FRANK, firm of T. R. Foster & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FOSTER, J. W., firm of J. R. Foster & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FOSTER, HALLET J., firm of Ackerman & Foster, New York, N. Y. 
FOX, CHARLES G., with Kezar Falls Woolen Co., Kezar Falls, Me. 
FRANCE, E. W., Director, Philadelphia Textile School. 
FRANCIS, ROBERT T., Selling Agent, Pontoosuc Woolen Mfg. Co., New 

York, N. Y. 
FREEMAN, MYRON S., Supt.. with S. Slater & Sons, Webster, Mass. 
FRENCH, WILLARD C, with Gait Robe Co., Gait, Ontario, Canada. 
FRICK, WILLIAM R., Secretary, Brilliant Silk Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y. 
FRIEDMAN, LOUIS. Chemist, with Samuel McDowell, Philadelphia, Pa. 
FRISSELL, F. D., President Montgomery Mills Co., North Wales, Pa. 
FRISSELL, FRANK H., Supt. of Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn. 
FULMER, JOHN, of Fulmer & Apeldorn, Philadelphia, Pa. 

GABLE, JAMES F., Superintendent, Saxonia Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GALEY, WM. T., Jr., Gen. Mgr. Aberfoyle Mills Corporation, Chester. Pa. 
GARNER, W. A., with Kezar Falls Woolen Co., Kezar Falls, Me. 
GASS, JAMES K., Supt., Wm. Kedward Dyeing Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GAVEY, W. S., of the James Talcott, Commission Merchant Co., New York. 
GAYLE, WALTER W., with Mt. Vernon Woodberry Mills, Baltimore, Md. 
GEGAUFF, JOS., Jr., Philadelphia Rep. of N. B. K. Brooks, Boston, Mass. 
GIBBON, R. FITZ, Chemist, with Kalle & Co., New York. 
GIESE, FRANK L., Asst. Instructor, Philadelphia Textile School. 
GILL, JAMES S., Supt., Ludlow Woolen Mills, Ludlow, \t. 
GILLESPIE, G. E., with Hudson River Woolen Mills, Newburgh, N. Y. 
GILLESPIE, JAMES W., with Hudson River Woolen Mills, Newburgh, N. Y. 
GILMORE, CHAS. F., with Brighton Mills, Passaic, N. J. 

GLASGENS, VINCENT P., with J. & II. Glasgens Co., Inc., New Richmond, O. 
GOLDFINGER, THEO., with Reiling & Schoen, W. Iloboken. N. J. 
GOLDSTEIN, JACOB F., Mgr., Ladies' Cloak and Suit Dept., Gimbel Bros., 

New York, N. Y. 
GOODMAN, BENSON C, with Paragon Silk Co., New York, N. Y. 
GOODSPEED, FRANK O., Supt., with F. J. Goodspeed, Wilton, Me. 
GOOD, CLAUDE R., with Duplan Silk Co., Hazleton, Pa. 
GORDON, GEO. J.. Manufacturer of Shoddy, Hazardville, Conn. 
GORDON, J. P., Supt., Post & Sheldon Co., Slatington, Pa. 
GORMAN, JOHN F., with Thomas C. Gorman, Frank-ford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GRAFF, EDMUND D., with Peter Graff & Co.. Worthington, Pa. 
GRAHAM, JAMES E., Chemist, with American Soap and Washoline Co., 

Cohoes, N. Y. 
GRANTHAM, CHiVRLES V., with Bell Thread Co., Ltd., Hamilton, Ontario, 

Canada. 
GREENAWALT, D. F., Worsted Cloth Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
GREENE, HOWARD E., firm of Greene & Co. (yarns), New York, N. Y. 
GREENE, SPENCER B., with Hershey Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass. 
GREENWOOD, SAMUEL, Woolen Manufacturer, Coatesville, Pa. 
GREER, WM. K., Supt., Hoosac Cotton Mills, North Adams, Mass. 
GRIER, R. F., Jr., with Wiscassett Mills Co., Albemarle, N. C. 
GROESCHEL, S. C, Factory Inspector, Dept of Agriculture, Commerce and 

Indvistries, Columbia, S. C. 
GRUBNAU, HENRY, of Carl Grubnau & Son, Philadelphia, Pa. 

114 



GUNNING, .1(_)I1X. Maiuifacturcr of Silks, Easton, Pa. 
GUTTRIDGK, ERNEST, with Patch. ,gue Mfg. Co., I'atchogue, N. Y. 

II.\(,;i'E. EDWIN D., Salesman, with Aincrican Moistening Co., Boston, Mass. 

UAIIX, J. EEMER, Salesman, with 1. Reifsnyder, Son & Co,, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

IIAKill, GEORGE F,, Head Designer, with American W(,(,len Co Utica 
N. Y. 

n.M.l.lWELL, GEORGE W., Vice-President, The Ilallivvell Co., Pawtucket 
R. L 

ILA.I.PIN, EDWARD W., with U. S. Conditioning & Testing Co., New York 
iN. Y. 

HALTON, TEIOMAS H., Jacquard Machine Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HANCOCK, F. W., Jr.. with Cannon Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HANDWERK, GEOR(-,E A., with Reiling & Schncn, Weehawken, N. J. 

HANSEN, Jdll.X A., with Xew York .Mills. New York Mills, N. Y. 

HARRIS, EliGAU W., Siipt., Harris \ Co., Ltd., Rockwood, Ontario, Canada. 

IIAKRIS, Cl-IORCI-: I.., Ruyer, W. lloylston Mfg. Co., Easthampton, Mass. 

DAkklS. Wll.l.lA.M .1., of the John M. Harris Corp., New York, N. Y. 

IIAKKIS, W. r., with T. A. Harris, Dyers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

llAirr, HAROLD ll., Treas., Racine Woolen A[fg. Co., Racine, \\'is. 

1L\R1-. STAXIJ-A' IL. Instructor, Cotton Dept., Philadelphia Textile School. 

HASKELL, RALPH W., with Haskell Silk Co., Westbrook, Me. 

11. XrCH, HAIHO' W.. with Geo. E. Kunhardt, Lawrence, Mass. 

H \^•|•:S, i; Akin' B., \\',n,]vn :\ranufacturer, Toronto, Canada. 

HAY\\(JOD, T. HOLT, with Frederick Victor & Achelis, Commission Mer- 
chants, New York, X. Y. 

HECK, CHARLES, with Nalentine \- Bentley, Newton, N. J. 

IH'.MRICK, !•:. E., with Proximity Alfg. Co., Greensboro, N. C. 

lIKIDGERli, Hr(;i) D,, with D. & H. Heidgerd (cloth house.). New York 
N. Y 

11I-:1SER. irAR()LD D., with Heiser, INIuhlfelder & Co., Albany, N. Y. 
HI<:LLER, ERNEST, Commissionaire, Havana, Cuba 

HELLWIG, GEORGE, with .\. Hell wig & Co., Silk Dvers, Pliiladelphia Pa 
HEXDEL. GEORGE S., of John Mendel Sons, Hat Manufacturers, Read- 
iiig. Pa, 

HEXDEL, RAY IL. with J,,hn Hen, lei Sons, Hat Manufacturers, Read- 
ing, Pa. 

HENNESEY, GEORGE S., with A. Klipstein & Co., New York, N. Y 

HENNICKE. CARL, with Aberfoyle ^D"g. Co., Chester, Pa. 

HENRY, C. S. A., Chemical Manufacturer. Felton, Pa. 

HENRY, ROBERT E., Manager, Monaghan Group Parker Cotton Mills Co, 
Chester, S. C. 

HERGESHEIMER, EDWARD H., with Sipp Machine Co., Paterson N J 

HICKMAN, J. TOWNSEND, ]u.. Inspector of Fabrics, U. S. Ouarterma st'er's 
Dept., New York. N. Y. 

HILL, JOHN A., Wool Specialist. Wyoming Experiment Station, Laramie 

Wyo. 
HINES. HEXR^-. with Miiutto :Meriden Co., ^linetto, N. Y. 
HINDS, JAMES 1,., with Hinds & Hi, Idle Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
HIRD, LE^^'IS A., with Samuel Ilird & Sons. Passaic, N. J 
HOBLITZELL, AL.\N P., with .Mt. Vernon Woodberry Cotton Duck Co. 

Baltimore, Md. ' 

HOERMANN, IL\NS, with Hoermann, Schutte & Co., New York N Y 
IIOFF, CLIFFORD ^r.. Salesman, ami Styler, with W. H. Duval & Co., 

Cirmniission Merchants. New York, N. Y. 

115 



HOFFMAN, MILTON T., Dyer, with R. & A. J. Gilmour, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOFFMANN, ADOLPH, iJesigner, with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 

HOHLFELD, H. L., President, Hohlfeld Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOLDEN, GEORGE B., with Nedloh Mfg. Co., Lowell, Mass. 

HOLDEN, LAWRENCE G., Wool lUiyer, with Dewey, Gould & Co., Boston, 
Mass. 

HOLMES, WM. L., Jr., with Archibald Holmes & Son, Philadelphia. Pa. 

HOOPER, JAMES P., Vice-President, Hooper Sons' Mfg. Co., Phila., Pa. 

HORAN, JOHN, of the Saxtons River Woolen Mills, Saxtons River, Vt. 

HORROCKS, C. M., with Horrocks & Bro., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HORROCKS, J. HOWARD, Mgr., with Horrocks & Bros., Frankford, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

HOSEY, THOMAS, Llead Dyer, with Wm Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

HOWARD, ALBERT S., Supt., Smith ^^■ebbing Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

HOYE, FRANCIS, President, Nasonville Woolen Co., Nasonville, R. I. 

HUNT, F. S., Supt., Louisville Woolen Mill, Louisville, Ky. 

HUNTER, GEORGE R., Chemist, with Eddystone Mfg. Co., Eddystone, Pa. 

HUNTER, GUY C^., Styler, wath Hunter Mfg. and Commission Co., Boston, 
Mass. 

HUNTER, HAL. T., Salesman, with C. E. Riley & Co., Boston, Mass. 

HUNTER, JAS. T., with James Hunter ^Machine Works, North Adams, Mass. 

INGRAHAM, WM. T., Chemist, Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, N. J. 
ISHIBASHI, M.. with Dairi Flour Mill, Moji, Japan. 

JACOBSON, EDWARD S., with Charles William Stores, New York, N. Y. 

JACOBS, J. HERMAN, Designer, Philadelphia. 

JAMES, THOS M., Designer, with Shannock Narrow Fabric Co., Paw- 
tucket. R. I. 

JARRELL, WM. F., Overseer, Cloth Room, Manchester Cotton Mills, Man- 
chester, Ga. 

JAUD, H.\RRY, Asst. Supt.. Woodhouse Bopp Co., West Pittsburgh, Pa. 

JEFFERS. FRANK W., Designer, with Waypoyset Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

JOHNS, WARREN A., Inspector, with Federal Rubber Co., Cudahy, Wis. 

JOFINSON, IRVING J., Supt., Stevens Mfg. Co., Quinnebaug, Conn. 

JOHNSTON, EDWIN, with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 

JONES, JOHN PAUL, Sec. and Treas., Jones Co., Harrisburg, Pa. 

JONES, SAMUEL M., with Arnold Print Works, North Adams, ^Mass. 

KALTENBACH, CHAS. E., with Kaltenbach & Stephens, Newark, N. J. 
KAPP, SYDNEY L., Asst., Jacquard Dept., Philadelphia Textile School. 
KAWAMURO, SHUJI, Tokio, Japan. 

REACH, ESMOND D., Asst. Supt., Ilesse Mfg. Co., Valley Falls, R. I. 
KEEN, FREDERICK L., with Deering Milliken Co., New York, N. Y. 
KEENAN, J. JOSEPH, X'ice-Presidcnt, Kaston Silk Dyeing & Finishing Works, 

Easton, Pa. 
KEFFER, JOHN W., Designer, with R. Forbes Co., Ltd., tiespeler, Ont., 

Canada. 
KELLER, FRED. P., with Jansen & Pretzfeld, Paterson, N. J. 
KELLY, ALTBRY D., with American Woolen Co., New York, N. Y. 
KELLY, WM. R., with Wm. F. Read &• Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
KERR, GEORGE A., Salesman, with Amoskeag Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y. 
KERSHAW, NELSON J., Supt., with Nelson Kershaw, Clifton Heights, Pa. 
KETCH AM, C. BROWER, Salesman, Mill Supplies, New York, N. Y. 
KILLHEFFER, ELVIN H., Chemist, with Kalle & Co., New York, N. Y. 
KINEAVEY, ROBERT F., with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 

116 



KIRBV, Wir.HUR L., Textile Analyst, Buying Dept., Larkin Co., Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

KIRKr.y\ND, R. W., with C. H. Bahnsen & Co., New York, N. Y. 

KIRKSEY, S. F., Jr., Vice-President and General Manager, Slayden-Kirksey 
Woolen Mills, Waco, Texas. 

KITCHEN, T. WEBB, with lames G. Kitchen & Co., Shoddy Mfrs., Phila., Pa. 

KITE, II. C, .Salrsnian Inr j. J. Regan Mfg. Co., Rockville, Conn. 

KITTl.E, GEDRGI': K., with Badische Co., New York, N. Y. 

KLEMER, WALTER F.. with Faribault Woolen Mills, Faribault, Minn. 

KLUGE, ALBERT ('., with German Artistic Weaving Co., Pompton Lake, N. J. 

KNEEDLER, lll-:.\R\' M., lirm of Kneedler & Co., Bridesburg, Phila.,' Pa. 

KNOERNSCllll.il, IH'GO J., with Gem ILimmuck and Fly Net Co'., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

KOR.XBRODT, I.OCIS II., Anilines and Chemicals, Portland, Oregon. 

KL'ENZEL, h'l-;LL\ A., Superintendent, Kuenzel Mills Co., New Bremen, Ohio. 

LAMM, SAMUEL G., with l.anun & Co., Chicago, 111. 

LAMPLEY, WILLIAM, Asst. Supt., Cowikee Cotton Mills, Eufaula, Alabama. 

LANDELL, HERBERT S., Formerly Manager, Anglo-American Cotton Products 

Corp., Philadelphia. Pa. 
LANDENBERGER, 1-. L., with T. W. Landenberger & Co. (hosiery), Phila., Pa. 
LANDON, E. J. (yarns), Philadelphia. Pa. 
LANIER, GEORGE H., President, Lanett Bleachery and Dye Works, West 

Point, Ga. 
L.\MER. LAI'WYETTE, JR., Agent, West Point Mfg. Co. and Riverdale 

Cotton Mills, West Point, Ga. 
LAUDERBURN, ALBERT H., Jr., with Duplan Silk Co., ITazleton, Pa. 
LEGGE, EDWARD, with Percy A. Legge (Yarns), Boston, Mass. 
LEGGE, HENRY C, with l\rcy A. Legge (Yarns), Philadelphia, Pa. 
LEHMAN, ROBERT V... Jr., Salesman, with Wm. Richardson (Worsted 

Yarns). Philadelphia, Pa. 
LEONARD, JEROME, with American Woolen Co., New York, N. Y. 
LEUPOLD, HARRY W., Designer, with ITardwick, Magee Co., Phila., Pa. 
LEVERING, FRANK D., with Eavens,,n & Levering, Public Wool Scourers, 

Camden, N. J. 
LEVERING, JOIIX W., Salesman, with Erben, Harding & Co., Phila., Pa. 
LEVERING, W.\LTER, firm of Eavens.m & Levering, Public Wool Scourers, 

Camden, N. J. 
LEN'Y, ABR.MTAM A., witli E. F. Tinune & Son, New York, N. Y. 
IJWY, HERBERT R., with Earnsdale Worste.l Co., New York, N Y. 
LE\Y, IRVING, with E. & H. Levy, New ^'ork, N. Y. 
LEVY, MORTIMER S., with D. Xusbaum & Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
LEWIS, D. C, Agent, Millville Mfg. C,,., Millville, N. ]. 
LEWIS, II. E.. Designer, with Adams .Mfg. Co., North Adams, Mass. 
LEWIS, CHARLES E.. with Lockpcrt Cotton Batting Company, Lock- 
port. N. Y. 
LIEBERMAN, J. FRED., with Pfaltz & Bauer, Dyes and Drugs, New Y,,rk, 

N. Y. (Philadelphia Representative). 
LINTON, TT()RACE, Manufacturer of Ribbons, Phila.lcli>hia, Pa. 
LITTLE, J. W., Jr., with Sohvay Dyeing & Textile Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 
LITTLEWOOD. A. C, of C. J. Littlewn,,,! & Sons. Manavunk Phila Pa ' 
LITTLEWOOD, GR.\H.\M J., with G. J. Littlewood & S„ns, Manayunk, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
LCX'KETT, WM. T., New England Representative of Chas. J. Webb & Co., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
LOEB, A. M., with Alex. L.ieb & Co., Meridian, Miss. 

117 



LORIMER, WALTER H., with Wm. H. Lorimer's Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
LOTTE, CIIAS. E., Treasurer, National Silk Dyeing Co., Paterson, N. J. 
LOTTE, WALTER C, Manager, National Silk Dyeing Co., AUentown, Pa. 

MABBETT, H. E.. Treas., George Mabbett & Sons Worsted Co., Plymouth, 
Mass. 

MACLEAN, EDWARD M., with Bibb Mfg. Co., Columbus, Ga. 

MALCOLM, D. L., Mgr. Thread Department, Barbour Flax Spinning Co., 
Paterson, N. J. 

MALCOLM, JOHN, with Crown Mills, Marcellus, N. Y. 

MANCILL, HOWARD E., with Frick-Reid Supply Co., Nowata, Okla. 

MANN, CHAS. W., with Wm. Ayres & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MARCHANT, H. S., Supt., Charlottesville Woolen Mill, Charlottesville, Va. 

MARKS, MARION J., Designer, with Knight Woolen Mills, Prove, Utah. 

MASTEROFF, LOL'IS P., with Sayles Bleacheries, Saylesville, R. I. 

MATTMANN, CARL C, Jr., with Astoria Silk Works, Long Island City, 
New York, N. Y. 

MAURER, WM. J., of F. W. Maurer & Sons Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

McADEN. JAMES T., with McAden Mills, McAdensville, N. C. 

MCALLISTER, W. W., in charge of Paterson, N. J., branch of U. S. Con- 
ditioning & Testing Co., Paterson, N. J. 

McCAFFERTY, WM. M., Pres., The American Textile Co., Cartersville, Ga. 

McCONAGHY, STEWART, with F. A. Strauss & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

McGLOIN, JAS. E., with Henry Kessel (woolens). New York. 

McIVER, E. G., Supt., Erwin Cotton Mills, W. Durham, N. C. 

McIVER, JOHN K., Jr., Mgr., with Nitrate Agencies Co., Savannah, Ga. 

McKENNA, STEPHEN D., Designer, Germania Woolen Mills, Holyoke, Mass. 

McKENZIE, KENNETH M., Supt., Bleachery, Carlton Hill, N. J. 

McKENZIE, LEON N., Head Dyer, Hope Webbing Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

McLxAIN, WM. A., Instructor, Hand Weaving Department, Philadelphia Textile 
School. 

McMASTER, JAMES, Jr., Designer, Berkshire Mfg. Co., Bridesburg, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

McMillan, EDWARD J., Asst. Gen. Manager, Standard Knitting Mills, 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

MEHLING, MORTIMER F.. Supt., The Beckman Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

MEJIA, ENRIQUE, Supt., Woolen Mill, Marangain, Arequipa, Peru, S. A. 

MEKSZRAS, CASIMIR J.. Assistant Instructor, Philadelphia Textile School 
(Weaving Department.) 

MELENDY, MELVILLE B., President and General Manager, Cherokee Spin- 
ning Co., Knoxville, Tenn. 

MELLOR, ALBERT, Treasurer and Asst. Manager, Standish Worsted Co., 
Plymouth, Mass. 

MELVILLE, JOHN G., with Melville Woolen Co., Chambersburg, Pa. 

MERZ, FRANZ, Jr., with Thos. H. Wilson, Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 

MEYER, LEON G., with Meyer, Bannerman & Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

MILLER, EARL L., Asst. Treas., U. S. Knitting Co.. Pawtucket, R. I. 

MILLER, HAROLD B., Asst. Supt., Oregon City Woolen Mills, Oregon City, 
Oregon. 

MILNE, CALEB, Jr., ) , , r r- i atm c c t.i 1 i , i • td 

,--..-,_ T^.,,-rTx ^ of hrm of C. T. Milne & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MILNE, DAVID, \ 

MITCHELL, ALEXANDER I., Prop., Cyril Johnson Woolen Co., Stafford 

Springs, Conn. 

MOES, C. A., Woolen Manufacturer, Toronto, Canada. 

MOHNS, IL, Asst. Supt., Catoir Silk Co., New York, N. Y. 

MONTGOMERY, WM. J., with John B. Stetson Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

118 



M(_)ORE, ELLSWORTH, Designer, with Jolm Aluurc Sons & Co., Phila., Pa 
MOORE, HAROLD D., Asst. Instructor, Hand Weaving Dept., Philadelphia 

Textile School. 
MORRLSSEV, CVRH. J., with DeerinR, :Milliken & Co., New York N Y 
MORTLAXD, HERBERT C, w.th .1. 11. Lane & Co., New Vork,' N.' Y. 
MLTR, WILLIAM, Designer, Hoosac Worsted Mills, Xo. Adams, Mass. 
MULHOLLAND, HARRY A., Designer, with Thomas Mulliolland, Phila., Pa. 
MLTNZ, JACOB, Supt., with J. B. Martin Co., Norwich, Conn. 
MURPLIY, J. RAYMOND, with Murphy & Bro., Philadelphia, Pa. 
MYERS, JULILTS S., Clothing Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

NAAB, JOHN. Instructor of Silk Weaving and Knitting, Phila. Textile Scho,d. 
NEELD, CIIAS. W.. Jk., with Wm. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
NELLIGAN, W. J., with A. H. Rice Co., Pittstield, Mass. 
NETTER, MORTON A., with Lipper Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
NETTLETON, E. S., iJesigner, with Ilockanum Mills Co.. R,,ckvilk-. Conn. 
NEWELL, GEO P., Agent, Living.ston Worsted Co., Washingt.m, R. I. 
NICHOLS, KOC.ER IL, Manufacturers Agent, Philadelphia, Pa. 
NOLAN, |.'K.\NK J., Jr., Examiner, Appraisers Dept., U. S. Customs Dcpt., 

New York, N. Y. 
NORRIS, JOHN, :\Ianufacturer Silk Linings, Philadelphia. Pa. 
NCTTER, V. I'A'lCRl'.TT, with Goodall Worsted Co., Sanford, Me. 

O'HARA, l-KA.\K W.. with Jacques W.df & Co., Passaic, N J 
OLSSON, KDWWKD, u,tli Wauregan Co., Wauregan, Conn 
OPPENHELMLk. LMWIX, of Eagle Belt and Suspender Co.. Tnc Phila Pa 
ORLEMANN. JUSTUS K., with Thos. II. WiLson Co., Phila.lelphia, Pa.' 

PATCHELL, DAVID C., Supt., Murphy & Bro., Philadelphia, Pa. 
PATTERSON, A. L.. Sec. and Treas., Lillian Knitting Mills, Albemarle, N. C. 
PATTERSON, JOHN W., Manufacturer (Argyle Mills), Philadelphia, Pa. 
PAUL, KARL R., .Manufacturer, Erankenberg in Sachsen, Germany 
PEABODY, MAXWELL, Efrtciency Engineer of Textile Plants, Wortendyke 
N. J. - ' 

PEGRAM, LA\\'RENCE, with Oppenheim, Collins 6c Co., Philadelphia Pa 
PERRY, D. DR.XYTON, Asst. Treas., Manetto Mills, Lando S C 
PERVEAR, CHARLES E., Jr., with Nat'I Tracing Cloth Co.', Savle.ville R I 
PFEIFEER, CHARLES, Boss \\'eaver. Binns Patent Ban,l Co.. Phila Pa 
PFEIEFER, WILLIAM, Instructor Power W^eaving Department, Philadelphia 

Textile School. 
PFEIFEER. FRED, with Jacob Miller, Sons & Co.. Philadelphia Pa 
PHILLIPS, HAROLD IL, Philadelphia Representative, Ludwig I'.ittauer, Raw 

and Artificial Silk Merchants, New York, N. Y. 
PHILLIPS, P1-:RCY T., Designer, Hope Webbing Co., Pawtueket R I 
PICKARD, WAYLAXD 1!., Supt., Indian Head Mills, Cordova Ala 
PIERSON, \V. M.. with Penn Worsted .Mills. Philadelphia Pa 
PINKERTON, S.\MUEL 1... with Carson College, Philadelphia Pa 
POLLARD, HERBERT 0„ Urm of Raymond & Pollard, Norvval'k Conn 
POMEROY, J.XMES V.. Cotton Broker. Graham. N. C. 
POST, LI. IRN'IXG, ViceT'resident, Merit Silk Co,, Paterson, N. J 
PRANKARD, R. S.. with Duplan Silk Co., New York, N. Y ' 
PRENDERGAST. LAURENCE F., with Wm. H. Prendergast, Bridgeton R I 
PROVOST, D.W IS A., with Elm Mills Woolen Co., Tilton, N. H. 

QUIN. R0B1':RT D.. with Duplan Silk Mill, Easton, Pa. 

OUINLAN, EDWARD, Ji;., with Fairhill Worsted Mills. Philadelphia. Pa. 

RAFFEL, WALTER, Superintendent, Thos. II. Wilson Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

119 



RAMBO, H. E., Carpet Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

RAMSPERGER, CHAS. A., with The Modern Silk Finishing Co., Inc., New 

York, N. Y. 
RANDLE, WM. N., Director, A. French Textile School, Atlanta, Ga. 
RAPP, FREDERICK M., with S. Slater & Sons, Web.ster, Mass. 
RAUSER, ERWIN F., with Dunham Mills, Inc., Naugatuck, Conn. 
REBERT. WILLIAM L., with Pine Tree Silk Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 
REED, HERBERT C, Chemist, with Stamford Mfg. Co., Stamford, Conn. 
REGAR, H. SEVERN, with Rambo & Regar, Inc., Norristown, Pa. 
REGAR, N. K., Worsted Cloth Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
REGAR, GORDON R., with Rambo & Regar, Norristown, Pa. 
REMINGTON, H. M., Cotton Yarn Commission Merchant, Philadelphia, Pa. 
RHEEL, HARRY ROY, with Springville Mfg. Co., Rockville, Conn. 
RICKER,- NELSON D., Asst. Mgr., Topeka Woolen Mfg. Co., Topeka, Kan. 
RIVELIS, MORRIS M., with Springdale Finishing Co., Canton, Mass. 
RIVELIS, SOLOMON, Dyer, with Springdale Finishing Co., Canton, Mass. 
ROBB, WM. C, Salesman, with Farbwerke-Hoechst Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
ROBERT, HAROLD D., with Schnable Bros., New York, N. Y. 
ROBERT, JAS. O., Asst. Treasurer, Capron Knitting Co., Utica, N. Y. 
ROSCHEN, WM. E., with Timme & Co., New York, N. Y. 
ROSENHEIM, FREDERIC S., with Paragon Silk Co., Paterson, N. J. 
ROTH, FRANK A., with Wm. H. Horstmann Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
RUFF, SAMUEL P., Jr., with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 
RUNYAN, S. K., Supt., with Thomas Leedom & Co.. Bristol, Pa. 
RUSCH, ADOLPHE, Jr., with Rusch & Co., New York, N. Y. 

SALATHE, FREDERICK J., with Johnson, Cowden & Co., Paterson, N. J. 

SCATCHARD, HENRY F.. Sec, Treas. and Gen. Mgr., Henry F. Scatchard 
Mfg. Co., Norristown. Pa. 

SCATCHARD, WARREN R., with Henry F. Scatchard Mfg. Co., Norris- 
town, Pa. 

SCATCHARD, WILLIAM B., with H. F. Scatchard Mfg. Co., Norristown, Pa. 

SCITADEWALD, H. M., Manager, Schadewald Mills. Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCFIADEWALD, W. F.. Supt., Schadewald Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCIIAUM, OTTO W., President, Schaum & Uhlinger, Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHELL, HERBERT H., of Schell Chemical Co., Inc., New York, N. Y. 

SCHENKE, F. E. M., firm of N. J. Textile Art Corporation, Montclair, N. J. 

SCHLEGEL, CARL F.. with Schlegel Mfg. Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

SCHLOSS. EDWIN H., with Roxford Knitting Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHLOSS, FRED., Designer with Darlington Textile Co., Pawtucket, R. I. 

SCHMAEI.ZLE, PHILIP O., Designer, with Geo. Brown's Sons, Mt. Joy, Pa. 

SCHMIDT, MILTON, with Saxonia Dress Goods Mill, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHMITT, JOSEPH H., with European Color and Chemical Co., New York, 
N. Y. 

SCHRAMM, WM. D., with Stead & Miller Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHUMANN, THEO. IT., firm of John E. Hanf & Co., New York, N. Y. 

SCHWARTZ, Chas. M., firm of Jacob Miller Sons & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHWEHM, JOHN H., with John M. Schwehm Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCOTLAND, J. M., Inspector, O. M. Corps, U. S. Army, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCOTT, HENRY T., with Wuskanut Mills, Farnumsville, Mass. 

SEAL, CLARENCE B., Inspector, Bureau of Engraving and Printing, Treasury 
Dept., Washington, D. C. 

SENIOR, WILFRED, Chemist and dyer, with Sanford Mills, Sanford, Me. 

SHARPLES, WALTER M., Jr.. Cotton Yarn Commission Merchant, Phila., Pa. 

SHERWOOD, A. G., Manufacturer of Draperies, Fringes, etc.. Phila., Pa. 

SHEL'ERMAN, SOL., of Sheuerman Bros., Inc., Des Moines, Iowa. 

120 



SniNN, JOSEPH H., Manager Philadelphia Branch U. S. Conditioning & 
Testing Co. 

SHOENFELD, JEROME P,., Salesman, with Wni. Wood & Co., New York, 
N. Y. 

SIIULER, FRANK B., with Miami Woolen Mills, Hamilton, Ohio. 

SIDEBOTHAM, JOHN B., Sec. and Treas., John B. Sidebotham. Inc., Frank- 
ford, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SI DM AN, GEO. N., Inspector Textile Fabrics, U. S. Marine Corps, Phila., Pa. 

SIEBRECHT, FREDERICK J., Manufacturer's Agent, Hosiery, Phila., Pa. 

SIMS, CLEVELAND, with Murphy Bros., Philadelphia, Pa. 

SINGLE, WALTER J., with Caron Co., Chicago, 111. 

SLIFER, GEORGE A., with Phila. Office, Wellington, Sears & Co., Phila., Pa. 

SLOCUM, ALBERT W'., Supt. of Faulkner Mills, North Billerica, Mass. 

SMITH, CHANNING, Proprietor, Valley Mills, Cherry Valley, Mass. 

SAilTH, CLARENCE W., Supt., Perry Yarn Mills, Webster, Mass. 

SMITH, DAVID A., with Western Shade Cloth Co., Chicago, 111. 

S.MITH, FRED. R., of The Ardmore Woolen Mills Co., Yantic, Conn. 

SMITH, HORACE, Chemist, Su,squehanna Silk Mills, Sunbury, Pa. 

SMITH, MAX W., Chemist, with Cleveland Worsted Mills Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

SMITH, WM. II., with Cannon Mills, New York, N. Y. 

SOLELIAC, EDWARD A., Mgr., Adelaide Silk Mills, Allentown, Pa. 

SOLELIAC, HENRY A., Manager, R. & H. Simon, Easton, Pa. 

SOLOMON, HARRIS A., with Consolidated Filters Co., New York, N. Y. 

SPENCER, J. HARRY, Jr., with T. Holt Haywood, Dept. of Victor, Achelis & 
Co., N. Y. 

SPERBER, ME^■1•:R, of Wall)cr Worsted Mill. Philadelphia, Pa. 

STAFFORD, 1-: S ) 

^,,„.„„_„,-^ ,-, ,^ Proprietors, Star Woolen Mills, Manavunk, Phila., Pa. 

STAFFORD, C. G., \ ' 

STAFFORD, WM. H.. with Stafford & Co., Manavunk, Philadelphia, Pa. 

STAINES, SAMUEL E., with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 

STEAD, CHARLES, Asst. Supt., with iMiIwell Bros. & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

STEAD, LAWRENCE A., Chemist, with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 

STEARNS, CLAYTON P., Designer, with Stearns & Foster Co., Lockland, 

Ohio. 
STEELE, GEORGE S., Suj.t., Robtrdel Mfg. Co., Rockingham, N. C. 
STEELE, WILLIAM. Designer, with Walker & Sterne Mfg. Co.. Phila., Pa. 
STEERE, CLARENCE, Designer and Asst. Supt., with llope Webbing Co., 

Pawtucket, R. I. 
STEIN, LALTRENCE B., with .\rthur Joel & Co., New Y.irk, N. Y. 
STEINER. GEORGE, with Princiton Worsted Mills, Trenton, N. J. 
STEPHENSON, DON. K., Sec. and Treas., Rock Run l^n.lerwear Co., Goshen, 

Indiana. 
STEPHENSON, HARRY R., with Union Bleaching and Finishing Co., Green- 
ville, S. C. 
STEPPACHER, W. MAURICE, Asst. Manager, W. M. Steppacher & Bro., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
STERZELBACH, LESTER, firm of A. Sterzelhach & Sons Co., New York, 

N. Y. 
STEVENS. JOHN X., .\sst. Selling Agent. Ludlow Mfg. Asso., Boston, Mass. 
STEWART, JAMES O., with Sanders Cotton Mill, Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
STEWART, JAMES T., President, Caledonia Wo.jlen Mills, Clifton Heights, 

Pa. 
STE^^■ART, JOHN G., Superintendent, with Andrews Mill Co., Frankford, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
STEWART, L. M., Vice-President, Stewart Silk Co., Easton, Pa. 

121 



STEWART, S. SCOTT, Assistant Superintendent and Designer, Caledonia 

Woolen Mills, Clifton Heights, Pa. 
STEWART, W. DUNLOP, with W. B. Stewart, Toronto, Canada. 
STIFEL, ARTHUR C, with J. L. Stifel & Sons, Wheeling, W. Va. 
STOLZENBERG, FREDERICK W., with Sidney Blumenthal & Co., Shelton, 

Conn. 
STOVER, JOHN \V., with Pelgram & Meyer, Harrisburg, Pa. 
STRASSER, IRA D., Designer, with A. J. Finn & Co., New York, N. Y. 
STRAUSS, ARTHUR K., with Cleveland Worsted Mills, Cleveland, Ohio. 
STRAUSS, FRED., Proprietor, Fred. Strauss Dye Works, Chicago, 111. 
STRAYER, D. W., Teacher Chemistry, York High School, York, Pa. 
STROOCK, BERTRAM A., Asst. Supt., with S. Stroock & Co., Newburgh, 

N. Y. 
SUESSMUTH, E. IT., with B. F. Boyer & Co., Camden, N. J. 
SUTRO, A. E., Hosiery Manufacturer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
SWALM, R. EARLE, Dyer, with Oehrle Bros. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
SWENEY, CHARLES F. (Store), Ladies' Wear, Curwensville, Pa. 
SWIFT, CLIFFORD J., ^'ice-President and General ^Manager, Swift Spinning 

Mills, Columbus, Ga. 
SWITZER, EDWARD T., Superintendent, Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 
SYKES, FRED M., firm of David Sykes & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
SYKES, HUBERT C, with Geo. Mabbett & Sons' Co., Plymouth, Mass. 
SYKES, ROY A., with Waterhouse & Buffum, North Adams, Mass. 
SZE, D. OSCAR, with San-Sing Cotton Spinning and Mfg. Mill, Shanghai, 

China. 

TALCOTT, JOHN G., Woolen Manufacturer, Talcottsville, Conn. 
TALCOTT, LOUIS H., Designer, Hockman Mills Co., Rockville, Conn. 
TAYLOR, HARRY, Superintendent, American Mills Co., New Haven, Conn. 
TAYLOR, SCHUYLER J., Asst. Supt., Russell Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn. 
TAYLOR, J. K.. with Wm. Wood & Co., New York, N. Y. 
TEASDALE, W"Sl. S., of Teasdale's Dyeing and Cleaning \\'orks, Cincinnati, 

Ohio. 
TEBBETTS, JOHN C, Jr., Chemist, with I. Levinstein & Co., Boston, Mass. 
TEILLON, LOUIS A., Asst. Supt., R. cS: H. Simon, Weehawken, N. J. 
TENNEY, EDWARD B., with Monadnock Mills, Claremont, N. H. 
THACKRAH, ALFRED, Jr., with Wm. Whitman & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
THICKINS, JNO. B., Sales Agent, with John & James Dobson, Inc., New 

York, N. Y. 
THOMAS, MATT. G., Vice-President, Appalachian Knitting Mills, Knoxville, 

Tenn. 
THUDIUM, WM. C, with Frank Schoble & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
THUERER, ALLEN H., with Appleton Woolen Mills, Appleton, Wis. 
TIEDEMANN, CARL H., with The Beckman Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
TILT, ALBERT, Treasurer, Phoenix Silk Mfg. Co., New York, N. Y. 
TITHER, JAS. T., with Globe Dye Works Co., Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa. 
TITHERINGTON, THOS. J., Supt., Barnsville Mfg. Co., Fairmont, W. Va. 
TODD, ROBERT L., with Pocasset Worsted Co., Thornton, R. I. 
TODD, ROGER, with Todd Carpet Mfg. Co., Carlisle, Pa. 
TOPPIN, E. B., with W. H. Ashley Silk Co., Kinston, N. C. 
TOURTELLOT, CARL T., Supt. of Weaving Aberfoyle Mfg Co., Chester, Pa. 
TRAINER, I). IRVING, Salesman, with General Chemical Co., Phila., Pa. 
TRUITT, JOS P., Jr., President and Gen. Mgr., Keystone Spinning Mills Co., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
TUTTLE, CHAS. C, with M. P. Tuttle Co., New York, N. Y. 

122 



UNnKRIIILI,, BEN7AMIN B., Agent for K. M. Gilmore & Co., New York, 

N. Y. 

VALENTINE, LINDEN M., with Grant S. Kelley (Commission Merchant), 

New York, N. Y. 
VERLENDEN, ALBERT T., with Verlendcn Bros., Inc., Darby, Pa. 
VERLENDEN, J. S., Secretary, Verlenden Bros., Inc., Darby, Pa. 
\'OC,T, ALBERT E., Sec. Vogt Mfg. and Coach Lace Co., Rochester, N. Y. 
VOLKHARDT, GEORGE T., with Aberfoyle Mfg. Co., Chester, Pa. 

WACIITER. EDMUND J., Manager, Frank C. Wachter & Co., Baltimore, Md. 

WADE, DANIEL J., Proprietor, of Wade Mills, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WAGNER, MAN II., Asst. Supt., S. Slater & Sons, Webster, Mass. 

WAIILS, HENRY C, President, Wahls Ribbon Mfg. Co., Inc., Jersey City 
Heights, N. T. 

WALL, WM. .!., firm of Nicetown Dye Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WALKER, GI'.O. W., iirm of Walker & Stine, Frankfc.rd, Philadelphia, Pa. 

W'.VLl.ACll, HARRY K,, Cutt.in Converter, New York, N. Y. 

WALLISI';R, carl O., Vice-President, LI. F. Walliser & Co., Chicago, 111. 

WALTER, F. W., Mfr., Wool Substitutes, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WARD, L. Da COSTA, Head of Chemistry and Dyeing Department, Phila- 
delphia Textile School. 

WARDLAW, JOLIN G., Asst. Mgr., Aniline Dept., American Dyewood Co., 
New Yoi-k, N. Y. 

W.\S1IBURN, CHAS. E., Mgr., Farbwerke-Hoechst Co., Chicago, 111. 

WASSON, FREDERICK E., with New York Belting and Packing Co., 
Baltimore, Md. 

WATERS, JOHN F., with Germantown Dye Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WATERBURY, R. IL, with Waterbury Felt Co., Skaneateles, N, Y. 

WATKINS, W. F., Supt., with Joseph Greer, Frankford, Phila., Pa. 

WATSON, JOHN R., with Astoria Silk Works, Astoria, Long Island, N. Y. 

WATT, WM., with Wm. Watt & Son, Norristown, Pa. 

WE.W'ER. ALGERNON T., Designer, Somerset Worsted Mills, E. Madison. 
Maine. 

WEBB, THOMAS N., Trcas., Bellevue Mfg. Co., Ilillsboro, N. C. 

WECHSLER, DANIEL, firm of Wechsler, Barber Silk Co., New York, N. Y. 

WECHSLER, LAWRENCE A., with Samuel Eiseman Co., New York, N. Y. 

WEIHENMAYER, W. P., Worsted Spinner, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WEI, L. H. T., Han Kow, China. 

WELLS, ARTHUR, Designer, South Bend W'oolen Co., South Bend, Ind. 

WERNER, HERMAN O., with No. Star Woolen Mill Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

WESTCOTT, LAMAR, with Richmon.l Hosiery Mills. Rossville, Ga. 

WHITE, HARRY M., with Myers .\: J.desch, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WHITIN, PAUL, Treas., Paul Whitin Mfg. Co., Northbridge. Mass. 

WIENER, FRANK R., with B. E.lmund David, Paterson, N. J. 

\VIER, H. M., firm of Ecob & Wit-r. Public Dyers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WIER, NELSON E., with Ecob & Wier (Dyers). Philadelphia. Pa. 

WILMARTH, M. J., with Saunders Cotton Mills. Saundersville, Mass. 

WILSON, JAMES, B. A., Chemist, with Mutual Chemical Co. of America. 
Jersey City, N. J. 

WILSON, THOS. H., Jr.. Gen. Mgr., Thos. II. Wilson, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WIMPFHEIMER. CL.VRENCE A., Vice-President A. Wimpfheimer & Bro., 
New York, N. Y. 

WIMPFHEIMER, ILXROLD D.. firm of A. Wimpfheimer & Bro., New York, 
N. Y. 

WINCHESTER, WM. E., with Deering, Milliken & Co., New York, N. Y. 

123 



WISE, STANI-EV A., Selling Agent (worsted and woolens), Philadelphia, Pa. 
WITZ. ALBERT, with S. M. Witz (knit goods), Philadelphia. Pa. 
WITTENBERG, J. FREDERICK, Jr., with Cedarburg Woolen Mills, Cedar- 
burg, V\'is. 
WOELFEL, JOS. M., Finisher and Dyer, Caledonia Mills, Clifton Heights, Pa. 
WOOD, CFIARLES, Wool Dealer, Philadelphia, Pa. 
WOOD, FRANK, of Frank Wood Mfg. Co., Valley Falls, R. I. 
WOOD, JOHN A., with Samuel Wood, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
WOOD, PENMAN J., Asst. Supt., Wm. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
WOOD, ROBERT W^ A., with W'm. Wood & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
WOOD, S.^MUEL, Manufacturer, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 
WOOD, THOS., Wool Buyer, Wm. H. Grundy & Co., Bristol, Pa. 
WOODWARD, HENRY A., with HoIHston Woolen Mills Co., Holliston, Mass. 
WOODYARD, HENRY T., Jr., Asst. Supt., Dixie Cotton Mills, La Grange, Ga. 

YOUNG, ALAN \'., Manager, Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Canada. 

ZENKE, FREDERICK O., iirm of Mole & Zenke, Inc., New York, N. Y. 





Cassella Color Company 



182 Front Street New York 



MAIN DISTRIBUTING 
PLANT 



124 



ESTABLISHED 1803 INCORPORATED 1<)1« 



Andreykovicz & Dunk 



INCORPORAIED 



ANILINE COLORS 
EXTRACTS, ETC. 

58 and 60 NORTH FRONT STREET, PHILA., PA. 

Philadelphia Representatives 
SANDOZ ANILINE WORKS BASLE, SWITZERLAND 

VICTOR BENZINE SOAP 



Berlin Aniline Works 

Main Office: 213-215 Water St., New York City 

BRANCHES 

Boston, Mass. Phiiadephia, Pa. 

Chicago, III. Charlotte, N. C. 



Importers and Exporters 

COALTAR DYES AND 
DYESTUFFS 

FOR THE TEXTILE TRADE 



Farbwerke-Hoechst Co. 

Formerly H. A. METZ & CO. 

122 Hudson Street - New York, N. Y. 



Aniline Colors Alizarine Colors 

Helindone Colors 

Indigo MLB Pharmaceutical Products 

Photographic Colors 



BOSTON, 130 Oliver St. ATLANTA, 1418 Empire Bldg. 

PHILADELPHIA, 104 Chestnut St. CHICAGO, 317 N. Clark St. 

PROVIDENCE, 23 S. Main St. SAN FRANCISCO, 20-22 Natoma St. 

CHARLOTTE, 210 S. Tyron St. 



Globe Dye Works Co. 

Successors to R. GREENWOOD & BAULT 

DYERS, BLEACHERS 



AND 



Mercenzers and skeb varSs 

ALSO DEALERS IN 

MERCERIZED YARNS 
140 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 

Works: Kinsey and Worth Sts., FRANKFORD, PA. 



JACOB KNUP, President W. J. GUTEKUNST, Vke-Pres. and Treas. 

THE HELLWIG 
SILK DYEING COMPANY 



SILK DYERS 



Office : Ninth and Buttonwood Sts. Philadelphia 

BRANCH: Wissinoming 



TAIN KS 




' AMOS H. HAIL 
, & SONS 

2915-2933 N. 2d St. 
PHILAO[lPHIA, PA, 



UNIFORMS 

FOR 

MILITARY TRAINING CAMPS 

UNITED STATES ARMY 

NATIONAL GUARD 

BOYS BRIGADE 

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA 



SIGMUND EISNER CO., Red Bank, New Jersey 

Official National Outfitter, Boy Scouts of America 
NEW YORK OFFICE: 103 FIFTH AVE. 



FIRTH & FOSTER CO. 
Dyers and Finishers 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

NEW YORK OFFICE - - 212 FIFTH AVENUE 

Phone, Madison Square 4531 

The oldest and best equipped plant for the dyeing and finishing of 

Bolivias, Burellas, Velours, Gabardines, Poplins, 

French Serges, etc. 

Also Jersey Cloths, Chinchillas and Cloakings 
Cotton Warp Mohairs, Bradford Finish, for dress or linings. 



Greatest Success in Silk and Wool Goods 
such as Poplins, Crepes, Henriettas, etc. 



LEADERS IN THE FINISHING OF NOVELTIES 



^6!^ SAVESDARNING 



■^^&* ^ SAVESDARNING ^ <<i ^ 



NV^-^ WEARS-LONGER ^Cj^ 

NICfTOWN DYE WORKS 

"It All Depends Upon the Dye 

Dyers of Hosiery and Yarns 

Office and Works, - Westmoreland and C Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 



"Wpandottc" 



CrMtwtt CM 




Many Are Called But Few Chosen 

Every year witnesses the birth of many new articles of trade. 
Likewise, too, every year records the death of many unable to 
cope with trade requirements. It is a survival of the fittest. 

First orders may be influenced, but con- 
tinuous reorders can be measured only by 
the law of profits. 

"Wyandotte'' Yellow Hoop 

has survived. And not only survived, but it tias 
also continually gained in favor year after year. 

What you think, what we think, cannot change 

the record. If both of us are fair with ourselves and 

with "Wyandotte" Yellow Hoop we must assign to 

it a place among the successful. And if it is a suc- 

I - . cessful product it deserves the attention of every 

j tiH i B. for* CompanPi ^^^ engaged in Textile Industry since there is where 

. BiA iLi« ! jj has proved its usefulness. 



THE J. B. FORD COMPANY, Sole Mnfrs. 

WYANDOTTE, MICH. 

This Soda has been awarded the highest prize wherever exhibited 



FINE TEXTILE FABRICS DYEING AND BLEACHING 



ABERFOYLE 

MANUFACTURING CO 



Mercerized 
V arns 



CHESTER 



PENNA. 



SPECIAL NOTICE TO OUR STUDENTS 

WHILE the products of The Dobbins Soap Mfg. Co. are 
widely known throughout the U. S., and have been for 
the last half century, their excellence is probably not known to 
the full extent by the new generation, and as the Dobbins Co. 
are always glad to let their goods tell their own story, they will 
gladly send working samples of their Soaps, Softeners and 
Olammon, free of all charge, to any textile manufacturing con- 
cern that desires to test them. x\ddress 

DOBBINS SOAP MFG. CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



A. T. BAKER & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

PLUSHES CORDUROYS VELVETS 

and 

FANCY VELOURS 

MANAYUNK, - - PENNA. 



EAVENSON & LEVERING CO. 

Wool Scoured, Carbonized 
Combed and Stored 

CAMDEN NEW JERSEY 

PHILADELPHIA & READING R. R. SIDING 




BELTS THAT SAVE TROUBLE 

RHOADS LEATHER BELTS 

They stretch so little 
They pull so strong 
They run so well 
They last so long 

J. E. RHOADS & SONS 

PHILADELPHIA, 12 N. Third St. 

NEW YORK, 102 Beekman St. 

CHICAGO. 322 W. Randolph S<. 
Factory and Tannery Wilmington, Del. 



DANA WARP MILLS 

Manufacturers of 

Cotton Yarns and Warps 

Carded and Combed, White Bleached and Colored 

WESTBROOK, ME. 



BEN J. BOOTH, President PAUL LANG, Secy and Treas. 

BENJ. BOOTH & CO., Inc. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



CARD CLOTHING 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 



OFFICE AND FACTORY 

1717-29 Bodine Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Harry C Aberle & Co. 

Hosiery 

Clearfield and A Streets, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ROXFORD KNITTING CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Men 's Two-Piece Balhriggans and 
Flat and Ribbed Union Suits 



ROXFORD KNITTING CO. PHILADELPHIA 

XXV 



THE 



Waterloo Woolen Manufacturing Co. 



□ □ □ 



UNIFORM CLOTHS 

FINE BROADCLOTHS 
SERGES 



Patterson & Greenough 

SELLING AGENTS 

45 E. SEVENTEENTH STREET, NEW YORK 



SHELBOURNE MILLS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Worsteds for Men's Wear 

215 Fourth Avenue, New York 



The SchwarzAvaelder Co. 



ESTABLISHED 1850 



EXAMINERS, SPONGERS, WATER 
PROOFERS and RUBBERIZERS 

301-303 Cherry Street - Philadelphia 



L S. WATSON MFG. CO. 

LEICESTER, MASS. 

are the sole agents for the GENUINE GERMAN, FELTEN 
& GUILLEAUME TWIN WIRE STEEL HEDDLES. Our 
specialty is IRON END HEDDLE FRAMES, and we also 
make wooden end heddle frames. We are manufacturers 
of HAND STRIPPER CARDS and DOMESTIC WIRE 
HEDDLES of every description. 

Your correspondence is solicited when in want 

EMMONS LOOM HARNESS CO. 

COTTON HARNESS 
MAIL HARNESS and REEDS 

For Weaving Cotton, Silk and Woolen Goods 

MAIL JACQUARD HEDDLES. TAPE SELVEDGES 
Samples on request 

LAWRENCE, MASS. 

Steel Heddle Manufacturing Co. 

2100-18 W. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

Flat Steel Heddles and Frames, Improved Drop Heddles and 

Wires, Duplex Heddles and Doup Heddles ; 
Broad Silk and Ribbon Reeds, Reed Wire in Soft and Cast Steel 

SPECIALISTS IN METAL PUNCHING 

Established 1875 



WALKER MFG. COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Loom Reeds, Heddles 
Heddle Frames, Etc. 

ASK ABOUT OUR DOUPE AND GAUZE REEDS 

ASK TO SEE OUR NEW SLIDING STUD FRAME 

ALSO OUR DOUBLE BAR FRAMES 

Kensington Ave. and Ontario St. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ARTHUR SCHWARZ, President JOHN W. NARY, Treasurer 

Princeton 
Worsted Mills, Inc. 

Trenton, N. J. 



WM. G. CHAVE ^^^ ^"""^^ Office 

Selling Agent 334 FOURTH AVENUE 



Shackamaxon Mills 

Philadelphia 

J. R. KEIM & CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

FINE WORSTEDS 

FOR MEN'S WEAR 



DELAINE MILLS 



INCORPORATED 1903 

Makers of 



FINE WORSTED FABRICS 

Baker and Mallory Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 

Selling Agents, WATERHOUSE WORSTED CO., 334 Fourth Avenue, N. Y. 
FOUNDED 182r 

PONTOOSUC WOOLEN MfG. CO. 

PITTSFIELD, MASS. 

Men's Wear Woolens and Cloakings 

Selling Agent : 

ROBERT T. FRANCIS, 25 Madison Ave, New York 



BATTEY, TRULL & CO. 

SELLING AGENTS FOR 

Dunn Worsted Mills 
Pawcatuck Woolen Mills 

257 Fourth Avenue New York, N. Y 



Established 1887 as RALPH COLWELL C&, CO. 

GEORGE M. BAKER , , , ,„„, RALPH COL'WELL 

President Incorporated 1903 Secy-Treas. 

COLWELL WORSTED MILLS 

manukacturi:rs of 

Fine Worsteds 

S&'S'lSiLL 204 Hartford Avenue, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

N. Y. Selliiifi Agents: J. B. FRASER & CO.. 21.S Fourth Ave. 

XXIX 




If you wear a flannel shirt 

it's worth while to know who made the flannel — there's a dif- 
ference. See that the shirt you buy has the above hanger in the 
neckband showing that it's made of the celebrated, warranted 

Cherry Valley Flannel 

Least shrinkage and greatest wearing qualities of any flannel 
made. Manufactured by a mill that was making flannel in 
your grandmother's time. Still produced in Standard Shades. 



CHANNING SMITH 

Prop. 



Valley Woolen Mills 



CHERRY VALLEY 
MASS. 



Yorkshire Worsted Mills 

Manufacturers of 

f ANCY WORSTED PABRICS 



LENNI MILLS, 



DELAWARE COUNTY, PA. 



John M. Harris Corporation 



Manufacturers' Agents 



Fancy Worsteds, Serges, 
Cassimeres, Overcoatings 



215 FOURTH AVENUE 



NEV^ YORK 



ANDREW'S MILL COMPANY 

Men's Wear and Dress Goods 
Fabrics 

FRANKFORD : PHILADELPHIA 



NEW YORK OFFICE. 229 FOURTH AVENUE 



NEW YORK BOSTON 

53 Leonard Street 31 Bedford Street 



JOHN G. CARRUTH & CO. 

ENDURANCE MILLS 

Manufacturers of 

FINE TEXTILE FABRICS 

Mills and Main Office : 
INDIANA AVKNUE and ROSEHILL S 1 RlilCT 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



CHICAGO ST. LOUIS 

223 W. Jackson Boulevard 503 N. 12th Street 



T. H. Wilson, Jr., Pres. & Treas. S. E. Wilson, Vice-Pres. J. K. Orlemann, Sec'y 



ESTABLISHED 1875 



THOMAS H. WILSON, Inc. 

cJTVIember American Association of Woolen and Worsted 
Manufacturers 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Fine Worsteds 

Hampden Mills, 1420-1432 N. Howard Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



SALESROOMS SALES MANAGERS 

45 East I7th Street, New York City Nixon, Walker CSi Tracy 



GEORGE CHETZEL CO. 

CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA 

MANUFACTURERS Or 

WORSTEDS and WOOLENS 



FOR 



MEN'S and WOMEN'S WEAR 



SELLING AGENTS 

M. M. STOCKTON & COMPANY 

25 MADISON AV E N U E 

NEW YORK 



Frederick Jones & Co., Inc. 

D ESIGN PAPERS 
FOR ALL TEXTILE FABRICS 
402-404-406 Race St. PHILADELPHIA 



ESTABLISHED 1892 INCORPORATED 1909 

Richard Thorpe Companj^ 

DAMASK 
Manufacturers 



1657 MEADOW ST. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Henry L. Scott & Co. 

Manufacturers of 

TESTING MACHINES 

AND 

APPLIANCES 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



F. W. MAURER & SONS CO. 

Manufacturers 

Fringes, Tapes, Bindings and Narrow Fabrics 

OFFICE AND FACTORY 

Wayne Ave. and Bristol St. PHILADELPHIA 

KROUT & FITE MFG. CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Tapes, Bindings and Narrow Fabrics 

Allegheny Ave. and Emerald St. 
Both Phones PHILADELPHIA 

THEODORE C. SEARCH, President O. W. WHITE, Treasurer 

The Cold Spring Bleaching 
and Finishing Works 



EXCLUSIVELY FOR 



Manufacturers and Converters 

Plant Entirely New- — Located Main Line, Pliiladelphia and Reading 

Railway from Piiiladelphiato New York City, Southern Mills 

will find tliis location most convenient, laeing on tlie 

direct route to Northern Markets 



Most Careful Attention. The Best 
of Facilities. Prompt Delivery 



YARDLEY :: PENNSYLVANIA 



WEIMAR BROTHERS 

Manufacturers of 

TAPES, BINDINGS and 
NARROW FABRICS 

2042-48 AMBER STREET PHILADELPHIA 



SAMUEL REID. Pres. & Treas. IVAN B. SCOVILL, Vice-Pres. 

ROBERT FRYERS, Sec. 



Industrial Tape Mills Co. 

TAPES AND BINDINGS 
Jasper and Huntingdon Streets 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



AM[RICAN T[XTIL[ BANDING CO., Inc. 

Manufacturers of 

Spindle Tape and Bandings 

Marshall St. and Hunting Park Ave. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



LOOMS 

FOR ALL 

NARROW FABRICS 



THE INSINGER COMPANY 

Wayne Junction, PHILADELPHIA 



Established 1890 



JOHN CAPPER & SON 

Designing, Card Stamping and Repeating 

2628-30 MASCHER STREET 

Cards for Brussels and Wilton Carpets Cut r»iin » rxr'i »>¥tw i r« » 

Di . K/i L- Di u I J/- J PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

on Plate Machines - Blank Jacquard Cards ' 



Designing 
Engraving : Printing 



I =1 



THE BECK ENGRAVING COMPANY 

620 Sansom Street Philadelphia 



The Better Grade of 
Printing 



We w^ould be pleased 
to suDmit estimates for 
tne printing of Cata- 
log's, Booklets, Folders 
<d Business Stationery 

Specialists in Printing 
of Foreign Languages 




i ke Niles Press 

Ninth and Sansom Streets 

PHILADELPHIA 



Exceptional Facihties for Color vvork 



Chicago Philadelphia New York 

E. L. Mansure Company 

Upholstery and Drapery 
Trimmings Embroideries 



183-185 North Michigan Ave. ri-tirAm 

Michigan Ave. and Lake St. L^ril%^J\.KjLJ 



THE 

STEADS MILLER COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

UPHOLSTERY GOODS 
AND DRAPERIES 

FABRICS FOR INTERIOR DECORATIONS 

WALL AND FURNITURE COVERINGS 

COUCH COVERS AND PORTIERES 



Main Office and Factory 

4-th and Cambria Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 



New York Salesroom Chicago Salesroom 

242 Fourth Avenue 1602 Hey worth Building 



Artloom Tapestry Curtains, Couch Covers 

Table Covers 

Gobelin Piece Goods 

and Plush Fabrics .^~~ 







PHILADELPHIA TAPESTRY MILLS 

MILLS— Allegheny Ave. and Front St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

New York Office, 141-147 Fifth Ave. 



"MOSS ROSE"^p^A^P^fp^ 



DRAPERIES 



The Moss Rose 
Manufacturing Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Tapestry Curtains, Couch Covers 

and 

Upholstery Goods 



PHILADELPHIA 



ALEX. D. STELLE WALTER H. ROSSMASSLER 

President Treasurer 

SauquoitSilkMfg.Co. 

Mills: 

Bethlehem, Pa. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Scranton, Pa. 

^^^^^^^^^^^"^' "■ ^^^" 

I MANUFACTURERS OF | 

I ORGANZINE j 
I TRAM, TWIST I 



FRINGE and 



p I ivii>UL ana | 

j HOSIERY SILKS j 

J Fas/ D\;e Organzines for Woolen J 

^ Manufacturers a Specially J 

:: — 1 

y SILKS FOR INSULATING 

i PURPOSES y 



New York Representatives 
WILLIAM RYLE & CO., 225 FOURTH AVENUE 



PHILA. OFFICE: 4015 Clarissa St. ( 18th and Hunting Park Ave., Nicetown) 
CHICAGO OFFICE: 206 S. Market St. BOSTON OFFICE: 78ChauncySt. 



The only complete daily news service 
about WOOL AND ITSTRODUCTS— from 

sheep's back to yours — sheep raising, 
tops, noils, waste, yarns, fabrics, clothing 
and other finished products — all this infor- 
mation is sent daily, covering the markets 
of the world by cable and mail, to readers 
of the 

Daily News Record 

In addition, a distinctively specialized daily 
service of business news, first-hand, about 

Textiles in general, Credits and 
Commercial Litigation, Tariffs and 
Customs Matters, Labor Conditions 

and Legislation, together with a most 
interesting daily section of sane comment on 

Commercial Finance and Investment 



Independence, impartiality, accuracy, are the cor- 
ner-stones of the policy maintained for many 
years which has established the DAILY NEWS 
RECORD in the confidence of thousands of busi- 
ness men of important interests in every section 
of the country. 

Sample copies will be mailed promptly, free of 
charge, on request to 

DAILY NEWS RECORD 

8 East 13th Street, New York 




OOP i?tain 
' ^ THAT WILL WEAR 



If you want your stairs, floors, 
wainscoting and interior woodwork 
to shine and to keep their brilliancy, 
use Felton, Sibley & Co.'s 

"LAV-A-VAR" 

Varnish Floor Stain 

A varnish and stain combined. Will 
not turn white. Very elastic, tough 
drying, and made in several beautiful 
and popular shades. It is also to be 
had as a clear varnish, which will add 
luster to the surface to which it is 
applied, without altering its color. 

PELTON, SIBLEY & CO., Inc. 

Manufddurers of Colors, Pdinls and Varnishes since 1863 
1 36-1 40 N. 4th St., Philadelphia 



RICHARD TORPIN 



RICHARD 'lORI'IN, Ju. 



Richard Torpin & Co. 

Dealers in all kinds of 

HARDWOODS 

Building, Pattern, Finishing Liuiiher and Veneers 

MAHOGANY 

Hardv\ood Flooring a Specialty in 3/8 in., 13/16 in. and IVs in. 

SIXTH AND CLEARFIELD STS. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
VACUUM OILS 7^/»e Oils that Lubricate Most 

MANUFACTURED BY 

VACUUM OIL COMPANY 

For Sale in all the Principal Cities of the World 

ROCHESTER, N. Y., U. S. A. 

Philadelphia Office: 601-605 Brown Building, 4th and Chestnut Sts. 

TESTIMONIAL — Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art 

VACUUM OIL CO., Brown Building, Pliiladelpliia. 

(Jentlemen : — Replying to yours of the 8th Instant, I am u'lad ol an opportunity to testify to the 
excellency of your products. For several years past our Engineering Department has used your oils 
exclusively, and our engineer assures me that they have always been found entirely satisfactory. 
You may refer to us at any time and I shall be glad to have you use this letter in any way you see 
fit to do. Yours very truly (signed), LESLIE W. MILLER, Principal. 



XLI 



The World's 
Textile Authority 

Textile World Journal 

is the accepted authority by mill 
men. Published every Saturday, it 
contains the most complete textile 
service to be found — technical arti- 
cles, new machinery and processes, 
mill news, markets, quotations, etc., 
etc. Subscription $3.00 per year. 
Sample copy on request. 



ALSO 

Official American Textile Directory 

American Directory of the Knitting Trade 

Textile Books, (complete catalog free) 

Textile Advance News 



The Bragdon, Lord & Nagic Co. 

Textile Publishers 

461 Eighth Avenue (Opposite Pcnna. R. R. Station) 

NEW YORK 

BOSTON PHILADELPHIA CHICAGO GREENVILLE, S. C. 



Dleaching, Dyeing, Drymg, 
. -L^ Fmishing and ■ Merceriziog 
Machinery For AH Textile 
Fabrics, 

"FoxweH" Pneumatic Guider 
for Tentering, Dtying and 

Padding Machines, etc, 

H. W. Butterwortli & Sons Co. 

Established 182a 

^^'"'"'^^''iZLWSih, BLDG. FHILA0EIPHIA 



rAIRMOUlNT WORSTEO MILLS 

2Sth anti Spring Oardes^ Streete 

TACONY WORSTEO MILLS 

Tacony, PhiSadelpliiai 

Worsted Yarris 

ENGLISH SYSTEM 
FRENCfi SYSTEM 



THE ERBEN-Hy^RDIMG CO. 

512 Commerciai Tryst Buildifig 

PHILADELPHIA 



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